Finnerty Poland
417 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Rachel Finnerty
Scoop.it!

Fragments

Fragments | Finnerty Poland | Scoop.it
Winner of the National Jewish Book AwardAn extraordinary memoir of a small boy who spent his childhood in the Nazi death camps. Binjamin ...
Rachel Finnerty's insight:

 The book Fragments is the story of a Jewish boy, named Binjamin, living his childhood years without his family in a death camp called Majdanek. Early on, however, he witnesses his father being killed by “people in uniforms”. From there, he is taken by a woman who he does not know, to a station where they load up onto a very packed train. He does not know whom he’s with or where he’s going. The woman does tell him they’re going to Lemberg to get help from someone. But they never ended up reaching Lemberg, and never found the person that was supposed to help them. One day, a woman named Frau Grosz was helping Binjamin. She had taken him out of an orphanage in Krakow and brought him with her to this unknown place. Frau pulls Binjamin aside and asks him if he wants to go to her home in Switzerland. He declined the offer saying he belonged there. Then, without his knowledge, he says yes to her. Suddenly, he ends up on a train, filled with French children with a string tied around his neck without Frau Grosz. He is then sent to yet another orphanage. A boy named Motti, the eldest at the orphanage, took care of Binjamin. After a little while there, people in gray uniforms come, and a woman takes Binjamin saying she is taking him to his brothers, to Majdanek. The rest of the book is Binjamin’s experience at what he further learned was really Majdanek. Majdanek was a death camp for Jewish people and was ruled by Germans. Binjamin’s experience was not positive. He was sleeping with rats and bugs in the tightly packed barracks by himself with no family. While being hungry and thirsty 100% of the time, he is also very confused as to why he is there. He doesn’t get the war or even that he is Jewish. At Majdanek, he meets many different people, but learns that he can only trust a select few. But at last, he and hundreds of others escape the death camp. He is then sent to a foster family and attends school. Even though he is living with the excruciating memories of Majnanek, he is still determined to become educated and successful.

 


more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rachel Finnerty
Scoop.it!

The Holocaust

The Holocaust | Finnerty Poland | Scoop.it
Rachel Finnerty's insight:

This picture shows the immensity of the crimes committed by the Nazis led by Hitler's reign. The piles of bodies shown in this picture is only a fraction of the deaths caused by Adolf Hitler. The bodies shown were either shot, starved to death, or possibly put in the gas chamber. Their deaths were usually slow and excruciating, and they died for no reason at all, except for that they were Jewish.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rachel Finnerty
Scoop.it!

The Association of "Children of the Holocaust" in Poland

The Association of "Children of the Holocaust" in Poland | Finnerty Poland | Scoop.it
Rachel Finnerty's insight:

The Association of “Children of the Holocaust” in Poland is composed of Holocaust survivors who were 13 years old or younger at the outbreak of World War II, born during the war, were incarcerated in ghettos, concentration camps or death camps, or had to conceal their identity. There are 600 members to this association that reside in Poland today. Its headquarters are located in Warsaw. There’s mainly woman in this club because during the war it was hard to save circumcised boys. The oldest member is 86, while the youngest is 68. Their main purpose of creating this association was to increase and spread knowledge of Nazi crimes perpetrated during World War II, especially on children and youth of Jewish origin. Also, they want to preserve the memory of Holocaust victims and of persons who risked their lives in rescuing the prisoners. The Association of Children of the Holocaust’s main activity is to pursue efforts to improve the material well-being of "Children of the Holocaust." Their president is Joanna Sobolewska-Pyz.

 

 


more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rachel Finnerty
Scoop.it!

Schindler's List

Schindler's List | Finnerty Poland | Scoop.it
In the shadow of Auschwitz, a flamboyant German industrialist grew into a living legend to the Jews of Cracow. He was a womaniser and hea...
Rachel Finnerty's insight:

I would like to read this book because I'm very interested in the culture that surrounds World War ll. The horrors and tragedies that the Jewish people went through because of Hitler is horrible, yet really interests me. But, this book is from a different point of view. Instead of being at a Jewish person's point of view, like Fragments, it's from a Aryan's point of view. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rachel Finnerty
Scoop.it!

Heroes with solid feet. How a Jewish girl survived in wartime Berlin

Heroes with solid feet. How a Jewish girl survived in wartime Berlin | Finnerty Poland | Scoop.it
Rachel Finnerty's insight:

This article is centered on a man journeying back to Berlin to accept the Golden Bear from the Berlin Film Festival. He decided to actually go there out of curiosity. After being asked how it affected him to be in Berlin, she responds “My generation did not do a good job – so many wars, so much killing and of course, here in Germany, the Holocaust, perhaps the worst crime of all, the attempt to annihilate a people as a final solution” (Douglas). She goes on to say the question as to exactly why she was in Berlin truly bothered her because she didn’t know a proper reason for it. He tells of a time he was out with some Jewish friends and met someone named Inge Borck, who lived in Berlin throughout the war. Her parents and grandparents were actually killed in concentration camps. When asked why she stayed there, she explained that she owed that to the little heroes and those people were those who made her life less dangerous and helped her throughout the hard times till the Russians came in. The woman then says “I thought about it, but I feel I owe it to the little heroes who helped me. Not everyone here was wicked” (Douglas). Her story impacted him and made him come to the realization that you aren’t obligated to save a life – you only need to try to help other people.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rachel Finnerty
Scoop.it!

Alfred Hitchcock Documentary Nazi Death Camp Liberation Part I - YouTube

Alfred Hitchcock narrates this gripping video of the liberation of a Nazi Death Camp. The citizens of the neighboring areas as well as the German Military ha...
Rachel Finnerty's insight:

This documentary starts by introducing just what death camps really are. In Alfred Hitchcock’s point of view, they are completely surrounded by barbed wire and have a watchtower at the front gates. The smell is horrible, food is scarce, and there is no source of happiness. There were piles of bodies everywhere, left to rot and perish. It mentions how just down the road there were beautiful fields flourishing with flowers and cattle, and here it was much different. Death camps were barracks upon barracks filled with death and destruction. It says the dead that lay on the ground were not numbered in hundreds but in thousands. The roles were then changed at one point of time, and the SS soldiers had to help bury the thousands that they murdered. Water supply would be nonexistent for days on days. People in the death camps would just stare at the dead body piles in horror, disgust, and sadness day after day. Civil officials were brought to the death camps to witness what was going on, and they were very surprised, yet silent and said it was none of their business. Although, towards the end of the Holocaust there was more than 200 children under 12 years old found still alive in this specific camp. There was still hope for their future, despite what they’ve gone through.

 

 


more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rachel Finnerty
Scoop.it!

Poland

Poland | Finnerty Poland | Scoop.it
Rachel Finnerty's insight:

Poland is a very beautiful country with many influential landmarks such as the death camps used in World War ll. I would encourage you to visit them to learn about the history of them, but also enjoy Poland's natural beauty. Poland was a place full of corruption years ago, but now is a peaceful and phenomenal historical area.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rachel Finnerty
Scoop.it!

AMCHA Initiative - Committed to addressing antisemitism at institutions of higher education across the United States

AMCHA Initiative - Committed to addressing antisemitism at institutions of higher education across the United States | Finnerty Poland | Scoop.it
ITCA is Committed to addressing antisemitism at institutions of higher education across the United States
Rachel Finnerty's insight:

 AMCHA is centered on the goal of investigating, documenting, educating, and combatting anti-Semitic behavior on college and university campuses in America and the institutional structures that legalize it and allow it to flourish. AMCHA’s main goal is to help protect Jewish students living in America from the harsh criticism and judgment of today’s society. What this organization strives to do is investigate the problem of anti-Semitism on campuses with their database through reports. Also, they want to organize campaigns that address campus anti-Semitism. Next, they want to educate the Jewish community and the general public about the problems that occur on campuses because of anti-Semitism. Lastly, AMCHA promotes grassroots activism to act both locally and nationally to tackle anti-Semitism across America.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rachel Finnerty
Scoop.it!

Berlin moves to try 30 who helped guard Auschwitz; In renewed push, agency issues recommendation to country's prosecutors

Berlin moves to try 30 who helped guard Auschwitz; In renewed push, agency issues recommendation to country's prosecutors | Finnerty Poland | Scoop.it
Rachel Finnerty's insight:

This article, "Berlin Moves to Try 30 Who Helped Guard Auschwitz; In Renewed Push, Agency Issues Recommendation to Country's Prosecutors" discusses the situation of German justice officials recommending to prosecutors that they pressed charges against 30 surviving guards from Auschwitz death camp. The article states "This shows that even 68 years after the end of World War II, there can be no end to the prosecution" (Eddy). A Munich court found John Demjanjuk guilty of murdering 28,060 people at the Sobibor death camp. Although Mr. Demjanjuk died before a higher court could rule on the case, it opened the door for the seeking of concentration camp guards. They claim the next step in this journey to widen the search for former guards from numerous death camps. They plan to wrap up their investigation in guards from Majdanek death camp in Poland within the next 6 months.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rachel Finnerty
Scoop.it!

The Holocaust

The Holocaust | Finnerty Poland | Scoop.it
Rachel Finnerty's insight:

This article summarizes the time period centralized around the time period of World War ll, which was 1939-1945. The Holocaust is defined as the systematic killing of almost six million Jewish men, women, and children by the German government under approval of German dictator Adolf Hitler. Apparently, Germans referred to Jews as subhumans, and blamed them for problems such as plague in Germany in the 1930s. Then it starts to discuss the mention of anti-Semitism. They claim anti-Semitism started as early back as the year 29, when Jesus, a Jew was killed by a Roman Emperor. The Nazis came to power in Germany in 1933 with their leader Adolf Hitler. Hitler published a book in 1925 calledMein Kampf which portrayed the Jewish race as evil and that they were seeking domination of the world. Adolf Hitler praised the Aryan race, blonde hair and blue eyes, and strived to cleanse Germany of the Jewish race. The article states that Poland contained most of Europe’s Jews, about 5 million. Approximately 5,000 Jews were killed in Poland in the first two months of German rule. “Ghettos” were created within Poland, which were run-down sections that were very poor. The largest one was the Warsaw Ghetto, containing 380,000 people, 30% of Warsaw’s population. They were just like prisons, with barbed wire fences around them. Diseases spread quickly such as typhoid and malnutrition. The chosen decision on how to eliminate the Jewish population was genocide. In Poland, once again, prisoners would be sorted into camps under insufficient food, shelter, medical care, and clothing. Polish workers often worked themselves to death. Even in the conclusion of the Holocaust, while trying to conceal everything, the Germans were still killing large amounts of Jews.

 

 

 

 


more...
No comment yet.