Finland
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Finland
About Finnish society & culture. From snow to sauna, from natives to Nokia.
Curated by Ulla M. Saikku
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Let teachers teach, say Finns

Let teachers teach, say Finns | Finland | Scoop.it

In the second film in a series, BBC Wales education correspondent Arwyn Jones asks those in power in Finland how they maintain education standards as the country has topped international rankings in the past.

When the last set of Pisa results came out three years ago, Wales had slipped down the tables and is hoping for a better showing in the latest figures next week.

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Finland from a Teacher's Perspective

Finland from a Teacher's Perspective | Finland | Scoop.it

I was asked by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) to write an article comparing the US and Finnish education systems; I was pleased to do so. It took me hours upon hours because I wanted to do justice to the comparison. As you already know, I love Finland, its people, and I love what Finns do for their children. I hope I've captured some of this beauty.

Enjoy!

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The selection of teachers in Finland is as strict as that for doctors leaving schools in a very healthy state - Bala - Local news - News - Daily Post North Wales

In the second in our series examining what Wales’ education system could learn from Finland, Graham Henry looks at the role Finnish teachers play upon entering the classroom...

Finnish teaching students are subject to as rigorous a process as doctors go through in the UK before they are put in a classroom.

Last year, from 1,258 applications to enter school teacher training at the University of Helsinki, around 362 were selected for final exams and interviews, with only 123 accepted – an extremely picky applicant success rate of 9.8%.
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West Monroe Fulbright recipient to study education in Finland | The News Star | thenewsstar.com

A former Ouachita Parish teacher has received a Distinguished Fulbright Awards in Teaching grant to conduct research into teacher training and classroom instruction in Finland.

Jennifer Kelly, a National Board Certified reading specialist of West Monroe, is one of 19 U.S. citizens who will travel abroad with the teaching program.
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The Finnish National Board of Education - Education

The Finnish National Board of Education - Education | Finland | Scoop.it
The key words in Finnish education policy are quality, efficiency, equity and internationalisation. Education is a factor for competitiveness. The current priorities in educational development are to raise the level of education and upgrade competencies among the population and the work force, to improve the efficiency of the education system, to prevent exclusion among children and young people, and to enlarge adult learning opportunities. Special attention is also paid to quality enhancement and impact in education, training and research and to internationalisation.

Background to Finland’s success in education builds on the following:
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What circumspection! What delicacy of conscience!: Dispatches from Finland: Episode 1

What circumspection! What delicacy of conscience!: Dispatches from Finland: Episode 1 | Finland | Scoop.it
I teach in Finland, but in an international school, not in the Finnish system. As a long-time resident and frequent visitor to Finnish schools, I have a few insights into the Finnish education, um phenomenon? miracle? Whatever.

Here's today's installment:
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Learning From The Best: Pearson International Education Conference – Helsinki | Profesorbaker's Blog

Learning From The Best: Pearson International Education Conference – Helsinki | Profesorbaker's Blog | Finland | Scoop.it
This September, the Council of Chief State School Officers (CCSSO) and the Pearson Foundation welcomed more than 40 international education leaders to the second annual Pearson Foundation/CCSSO International Conference on Education. The gathering focused specifically on teacher quality and international best practices for identifying, training, and supporting great teachers was convened in Helsinki, Finland, in the hope that this worldwide delegation could learn from Finland’s own success in preparing its K-12 and university educators to meet the demands of an increasingly inter-connected and technologically advanced workforce.
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#Finnedchat - All about Finnish Education: Finland's education success - Report from BBC

#Finnedchat - All about Finnish Education: Finland's education success - Report from BBC | Finland | Scoop.it
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Yglesias » Teacher Quality In Finland

They don’t do extensive test-based assessment of teacher performance, but the human capital inputs into the profession are very high quality. It’s not just that their teachers are extensively trained, but admission to the training programs is highly selective—only about 15 percent of applicants are admitted. More broadly, as an important McKinsey report released last year showed, just 23 percent of American teachers are drawn from the “top third” of college graduates. By contrast, in Finland (and Singapore and South Korea) 100 percent of teachers are from the “top third.”
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Educational Forum raises awareness of school reforms - Fairfield - Minuteman News Center

Finland, a country with a population of 5 million people, is considered to have one of the best school systems in the world. Teaching is considered one of the top professions in the country and competition for those coveted slots in Finnish universities is keen. Students start school at the age of 7 and are taught according to their individual developmental needs. There is very little homework, and students endure very little standardized testing yet maintain top scores internationally on the tests they do take. They are taught to take personal responsibility for their own education and their place in Finnish society as adults.
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Racing to Nowhere: What America's Education System Can Learn From Finland - Patch.com

Racing to Nowhere: What America's Education System Can Learn From Finland - Patch.com | Finland | Scoop.it
“The Race to Nowhere," the documentary film by Vicki Abeles about the pressures children face in our current education system. Below is one parent's take on the film. - What does Finland do differently from the United States? A lot. Finland has a high graduation rate, equality in access to education for all students, high scores on benchmark testing, and moderate spending per pupil. Teaching is considered a prestige profession. Only those who are at the top of their class can go on to be accepted to pursue a degree in education. It’s the most competitive field in the country surpassing law, medicine and finance. Not surprisingly then the Finnish people hold educators in the highest regard. They truly are the best and brightest.
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Teacher Training in Finland: Reflections from a Recent Graduate

Teacher Training in Finland: Reflections from a Recent Graduate | Finland | Scoop.it
Finland believes in high-quality teacher education. Students apply to enter teacher colleges at the end of high school. The small nation’s eight teacher preparation institutions are highly selective. Only one of ten applicants is accepted, based on multiple measures, including an essay, an entry test, an interview, and evidence of a high motivation to teach. In addition to studying liberal arts subjects and the subjects they will teach, future teachers study pedagogy, theory, and conduct research about education. They learn how to teach students with disabilities. They take the study of education seriously. They practice teaching. Preparing to become a teacher takes five years. -Diane Ravitch 
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Elizabeth Louw's curator insight, March 26, 2015 3:55 PM

Taking the study of education seriously and  holding teachers in high esteem in society  just seem to make sense. It isn't the reality in many countries. 

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The Best Resources To Learn About Finland’s Education System | Larry Ferlazzo's Websites of the Day...

The Best Resources To Learn About Finland’s Education System | Larry Ferlazzo's Websites of the Day... | Finland | Scoop.it
Finland's education system is touted by many as one of the best, if not the best, in the world, and its students consistently score at or neat the top of international tests ...
Read more: http://larryferlazzo.edublogs.org/2010/12/27/the-best-resources-to-learn-about-finlands-education-system/
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Finland: First in Class

Finland: First in Class | Finland | Scoop.it
This week Learning World is looking at Finland, which is recognised worldwide for its top ranking education model.

Foreign delegations frequently visit the country to try and discover the secret of its success. We spent a day at a school in the capital Helsinki to find out more about the philosophy behind the Finnish system.

Finland has the shortest formal teaching hours in Europe and the best educational results. Finnish children stay with the same class and the same teacher for at least six years – which makes school like an extension of home.

In Finland, competition to become a teacher is so fierce that all teachers have a Masters’ degree...
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Overtesting Drives Away the Best Teachers - Room for Debate - NYTimes.com

High-performing nations -- like Finland, Japan and Singapore -- have more cultural differences than commonalities. When you consider those commonalities you have to wonder: Is the United States still located on planet Earth? In the nations that rank highest on the Programme for International Student Assessment, teachers are: respected professionals; trusted by school administrators; given the autonomy to make curricular decisions; planning and assessing in blocks of time built into their weekly school schedule; and encouraged, supported and expected to collaborate to improve instruction.

Who’s getting paid to design these assessments and the materials districts, educators and parents will scramble to purchase to help children prepare for them?
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Are Finnish schools the best in the world? - The Independent

Are Finnish schools the best in the world? - The Independent | Finland | Scoop.it
Finland is the country that has topped the international league table of the developed world's education systems for almost all of the past decade. And England's Education Secretary, Michael Gove, has been taking a close look at its policies to see if there is anything he can glean from them to improve standards over here. Finland's top-level ranking is based on its performance in the PISA (Programme for International Student Assessment) tests of 15-year-olds around the globe in reading, maths and science. It is published by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development.
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'Send pupils to Finnishing school' - Scotsman.com News

'Send pupils to Finnishing school' - Scotsman.com News | Finland | Scoop.it
'Send pupils to Finnishing school' - A LEADING education expert has said that Scotland stands at a crossroads of whether to adopt a Nordic education system without testing or an English one of increased exams and league tables.
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Finland, Harvard and fun math | Inquirer News

Finland, Harvard and fun math | Inquirer News | Finland | Scoop.it
LAST WEEK, we looked at Tiger Mothers, a term popularized by US professor and author Amy Chua to describe the ultra-demanding way she raised her kids...

Do parents need to be tiger mothers and fathers to ensure that their kids do well? Not necessarily. Take Finland. Finnish parents are more laid-back than their Asian counterparts, but their children score high in international examinations.
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Steady Work: How Finland Is Building a Strong Teaching and Learning System

Steady Work: How Finland Is Building a Strong Teaching and Learning System | Finland | Scoop.it
Finland offers an example of how a nation built a comprehensive “teaching and learning system” that has raised achievement and closed achievement gaps.

The aim [of Finnish education policy] is a coherent policy geared to educational equity and a high level of education among the population as a whole. The principle of lifelong learning entails that everyone has sufficient learning skills and opportunities to develop their knowledge and skills in different learning environments throughout their lifespan.

— Government of Finland, Ministry of Education
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In Teachers We Trust: An Interview with Finnish Education Expert Reijo Laukkanen | LFA: Join The Conversation - Public School Insights

In Teachers We Trust: An Interview with Finnish Education Expert Reijo Laukkanen | LFA: Join The Conversation - Public School Insights | Finland | Scoop.it
Well, Finland for example doesn't evaluate their teachers, at least according to http://bit.ly/ijcGP0 #edchat...
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The Finnish Model: Why Teaching By Numbers Is Doing Harm | EducationState: the education news blog.

The Finnish Model: Why Teaching By Numbers Is Doing Harm | EducationState: the education news blog. | Finland | Scoop.it
Take heart. Finland, one of the world’s top educational performers according to the last PISA study and a recent McKinsey report, was once in a similar slump and can offer lessons for the United States and others seeking a cure for poor public schools.
As recently as 25 years ago, Finnish students were below the international average in mathematics and science. There also were large learning differences between schools, with urban or affluent students typically outperforming their rural or low-income peers. Today, as the most recent PISA study proves, Finland is one of the few nations that have accomplished both a high quality of learning and equity in learning at the same time. The best school systems are the most equitable — students do well regardless of their socio-economic background. Finally, Finland should interest US educators because Finns have employed very distinct ideas and policies in reforming education, many the exact opposite of what’s being tried in the United States.
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