Finland Education vs. American Education
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A Principal's Reflections: Children Stressed to the Breaking Point Due to Standardized Testing

A Principal's Reflections: Children Stressed to the Breaking Point Due to Standardized Testing | Finland Education vs. American Education | Scoop.it

Recently New York City made public teacher evaluations based on student standardized test scores. This proceeded the state of New York's decision to change how educators are evaluated, in part by connecting the standardized test scores of students into final ratings. The following letter was shared with me by a friend whose daughter is in the New York City Public School System. She plans on sending this to officials in the NYC Department of Education to inform them of the potential that more standardized testing will have as a result of recent reform efforts.


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Amy Lingafelter's curator insight, February 5, 2014 3:20 PM

I can use this to be awesome.

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Year 3 of Implementing the Common Core State Standards: An Overview of States’ Progress and Challenges

Year 3 of Implementing the Common Core State Standards: An Overview of States’ Progress and Challenges | Finland Education vs. American Education | Scoop.it
Year 3 of Implementing the Common Core State Standards: An Overview of States’ Progress and Challenges, a report by by Diane Stark Rentner at the Center on Education Policy in Washington, DC, USA...

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Mel Riddile's curator insight, August 7, 2013 9:49 AM

Key Quote:


"Common Core in math and ELA will require fundamental changes in instruction."

Lynnette Van Dyke's curator insight, August 7, 2013 12:36 PM

Deeper Learning and the GENERATION of ideas and products also rrequires a commitment and sticktuitiveness.  These require different levels of fortitude for students.

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A dozen basic guidelines for educators - The Washington Post

A dozen basic guidelines for educators - The Washington Post | Finland Education vs. American Education | Scoop.it

"Do we really need education policies and practices to cover everything that goes on in the classroom? Author Alfie Kohn says “no” and, below, offers basic guidelines that can really help teachers."

 


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Why Tablets Are So Much Better Than Textbooks - Business Insider

Why Tablets Are So Much Better Than Textbooks - Business Insider | Finland Education vs. American Education | Scoop.it
Why Tablets Are So Much Better Than Textbooks Business Insider CEO Joel Klein — the former Chancellor of the New York City Department of Education — told Business Insider that Amplify "really seeks to change the way we teach and the way we teach...

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Early Childhood Standards of Common Core are Developmentally Inappropriate | Truth in American Education

Early Childhood Standards of Common Core are Developmentally Inappropriate | Truth in American Education | Finland Education vs. American Education | Scoop.it
Child Psychologist Dr. Megan Koschnick Criticizes Common Core Standards for K-3 as Age and Developmentally Inappropriate. (A centralization of education that is "toying with a generation of students" & lacks common sense.

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Public Broadcasting Takes Role in Improving Graduation Rates

Public Broadcasting Takes Role in Improving Graduation Rates | Finland Education vs. American Education | Scoop.it

More than 100 public television stations showed a seven-hour telethon on Saturday that asked viewers to work with community organizations to lower the nation’s high school dropout rate.

 

By ELIZABETH JENSEN

More than 100 public television stations reaching two-thirds of the nation’s viewers turned over their air on Saturday to an unusual seven-hour telethon broadcast live from WNET-TV’s Lincoln Center studio in New York.        Enlarge This Image Brian Harkin for The New York Times

Brian Williams of NBC with Jaden Francois, 7, after they appeared in Saturday's telethon.      

                     

A parade of media stars, including NBC’s Brian Williams, CNBC’s Maria Bartiromo, CBS’s Rebecca Jarvis and public media’s Maria Hinojosa and Ray Suarez, exhorted viewers to “call the number on your screen,” but they were not seeking membership pledges. Instead, they asked viewers to sign up to be “American Graduate Day Champions,” and connect with community organizations working on the nation’s high school dropout crisis.    

   

The telethon was part of the fast-growing American Graduate initiative, seeded in the last year with about $5 million in grants to public television stations by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting.       

“Education is probably one of the hottest issues facing the country,” said Neal Shapiro, president and chief executive of WNET, which assembled the telethon in just four months. “I think people didn’t realize how huge the problem is, or how much success there could be and how local groups are actually making a difference.” 

      

While graduation rates have inched up in recent years, nearly 25 percent of students over all drop out.      

 

CPB, whose partners include the America’s Promise Alliance, the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation and the Everyone Graduates Center at Johns Hopkins University, has channeled an additional $10 million into program grants. The grants are for televised teacher town hall meetings, programs from Tavis Smiley and the Independent Television Service, and a coming four-hour PBS documentary, “DC Met: Life Inside School Reform,” from the National Black Programming Consortium, among other programs.  

     

Shows this week include a “Frontline” hour, a five-part “PBS NewsHour” report by Mr. Suarez and a public radio documentary. (Coincidentally, NBC News is broadcasting its “Education Nation” reports this week.) But stations have embraced American Graduate beyond the shows; many have become deeply involved with the broad swath of local community organizations tackling issues including abuse and abandonment, and teacher quality.       

 

In St. Louis, the Nine Network of Public Media is coordinating 51 local partners, which have divided into groups addressing such topics as early intervention, and parent engagement strategies, said Jack Galmiche, Nine Network’s president and chief executive. He characterized Nine Network’s role as helping disparate community organizations align their work more effectively.    

   

“Being in this community for 50 years, being a trusted institution, when we ask these groups to come together they show up and they show up with the best intentions,” Mr. Galmiche said. 

      

Other stations are developing curriculums for schools and production training programs for at-risk youth.  

     

While public television stations have long been involved in early childhood education through their preschool shows, the American Graduate work is far afield from the stations simply being an outlet for “Sesame Street,” or the prime-time hit “Downton Abbey.”       

“This is a next-generation relationship with our community,” said Rich Homberg, president and general manager of Detroit Public Television.       

Mr. Galmiche called it a return to public broadcasting’s original mission. “Being a provider of education and educational resources and civil discourse were the principles we were founded on in 1954,” he said. “Our value to this community is, simply, how do we improve community life?”   

    

John Kania, a managing director of nonprofit consultant FSG, which has worked with the stations, said shrinking revenues helped spur the new thinking. 

      

“There are serious conversations going on within public media right now about how do they improve their relevance both for society and as a media asset going forward,” at a time when state and federal support is dwindling, and consumers have lots of media options, Mr. Kania said. He commended the strategy, but said it was also risky, “because they’re working on a lot of issues where people have failed for many years to make progress.”    

   

Any impact on dropout rates will take years, raising questions of long term commitment. “Stations always chase the grant money to do something and then once the grant money stops flowing they stop doing it,” said Robert J. Daino, president and chief executive of Syracuse’s WCNY, which received American Graduate grants. He praised the program “as long as stations remain committed.”  

     

CPB is committed to supporting the initiative for five years, said Patricia S. Harrison, the corporation’s president and chief executive. “In order for this to be taken seriously, this cannot be a drive-by,” she said, adding that the goal is to find other support. Nine Network, for one, has raised $500,000 so far to support the dropout work.  

     

Ms. Harrison said she is hopeful the work will also convince detractors on Capitol Hill who want to cut public broadcasting’s funds. “It should, because it speaks to an issue that belongs to all Americans. It’s not partisan,” she said.      

 

“It speaks to the fact that the country is in trouble and that we cannot tolerate or even sustain a million Americans dropping out without changing how we think of ourselves as Americans,” she added. “If that doesn’t resonate with Capitol Hill, I really don’t know why.”  

     

Organizers said Sunday it was too early to say how many new volunteers the telethon generated. But United Way executives who appeared said they were pleased.    

   

United Way and more than a dozen public television stations are meeting this week to discuss a more formal relationship around the issue, said Stacey D. Stewart, an executive vice president at United Way Worldwide, in an interview at the WNET studio. “We have to activate action on the ground with volunteer programs and advocacy,” and public television stations can help get the message out on the local level, she said.       

 

 

A version of this article appeared in print on September 24, 2012, on page B3 of the New York edition with the headline: Public Television Takes Role in Curbing Dropout Rates.


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Can the iPad Rescue a Struggling American Education System? | Gadget Lab | Wired.com

Can the iPad Rescue a Struggling American Education System? | Gadget Lab | Wired.com | Finland Education vs. American Education | Scoop.it
Tablets are reinventing how students access and interact with educational material, and how teachers assess and monitor students’ performance at a time when many schools are understaffed and many classrooms overcrowded.

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The Great Stagnation of American Education | NYTimes.com

The Great Stagnation of American Education | NYTimes.com | Finland Education vs. American Education | Scoop.it

For most of American history, parents could expect that their children would, on average, be much better educated than they were. But that is no longer true. This development has serious consequences for the economy.

 

The epochal achievements of American economic growth have gone hand in hand with rising educational attainment, as the economists Claudia Goldin and Lawrence F. Katz have shown. From 1891 to 2007, real economic output per person grew at an average rate of 2 percent per year — enough to double every 35 years. The average American was twice as well off in 2007 as in 1972, four times as well off as in 1937, and eight times as well off as in 1902. It’s no coincidence that for eight decades, from 1890 to 1970, educational attainment grew swiftly. But since 1990, that improvement has slowed to a crawl.

 

Companies pay better-educated people higher wages because they are more productive. The premium that employers pay to a college graduate compared with that to a high school graduate has soared since 1970, because of higher demand for technical and communication skills at the top of the scale and a collapse in demand for unskilled and semiskilled workers at the bottom.

 

As the current recovery continues at a snail’s pace, concerns about America’s future growth potential are warranted. Growth in annual average economic output per capita has slowed from the century-long average of 2 percent, to 1.3 percent over the past 25 years, to a mere 0.7 percent over the past decade. As of this summer, per-person output was still lower than it was in late 2007. The gains in income since the 2007-9 Great Recession have flowed overwhelmingly to those at the top, as has been widely noted. Real median family income was lower last year than in 1998.

 

There are numerous causes of the less-than-satisfying economic growth in America: the retirement of the baby boomers, the withdrawal of working-age men from the labor force, the relentless rise in the inequality of the income distribution and, as I have written about elsewhere, a slowdown in technological innovation.

 

Education deserves particular focus because its effects are so long-lasting. Every high school dropout becomes a worker who likely won’t earn much more than minimum wage, at best, for the rest of his or her life. And the problems in our educational system pervade all levels.

 

Click headline to read more--

 


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
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The Global Search for Education: Got Tech? - Finland

The Global Search for Education: Got Tech? - Finland | Finland Education vs. American Education | Scoop.it

By now my followers know that I am a big fan of Finnish educator Pasi Sahlberg and his book, the 2013 University of Louisville Grawemeyer Award winning Finnish Lessons: What Can the World Learn from Educational Change in Finland? The Harvard Graduate School of Education recently named Sahlberg a visiting professor of practice beginning January 2014.Today I am pleased to welcome Pasi Sahlberg along with Finnish teacher and counselor, Timo Ilomaki, to The Global Search for Education - Got Tech? series to share their perspectives.


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Teacher Education in Finland: What are Finnish Teachers Made Of?

Teacher Education in Finland: What are Finnish Teachers Made Of? | Finland Education vs. American Education | Scoop.it
Editor's Note: Satu Uusiautti, Ph.D., contributed to this post. She is an adjunct professor at the University of Helsinki, and works as a specialist at University of Lapland, and as a post-doctoral r

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How Finnish Schools are Trouncing the US Education System with ...

How Finnish Schools are Trouncing the US Education System with ... | Finland Education vs. American Education | Scoop.it
How Finnish Schools are Trouncing the US Education System with More Recess & Fewer Tests. {Infographic}. elephant journal. Via elephant journal on Nov 24, 2013. “There's No Homework In Finland.”.
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NYC Schools Gap App Challenge

NYC Schools Gap App Challenge | Finland Education vs. American Education | Scoop.it
The NYC Department of Education is challenging software developers to submit apps and games that enhance math teaching and learning, and engagement for our middle schools.

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Obama's day: Technology in education - USA TODAY

Obama's day: Technology in education - USA TODAY | Finland Education vs. American Education | Scoop.it
Obama's day: Technology in education
USA TODAY
President Obama turns his focus Thursday to the role of technology in education.

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Sophia and Shoana's curator insight, November 21, 2013 1:46 PM

This falls under the intellectual arts categorie because it shows examples of how education and technology can be a good thing

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What's New in Tasks, Units & Student Work - New York City Department of Education

What's New in Tasks, Units & Student Work - New York City Department of Education | Finland Education vs. American Education | Scoop.it

Performance Tasks: Tasks, Units & Student Work - New York City Department of Education http://t.co/zeS3SJJ8fY


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Why Finland's education system works better than ours | Adventures ...

Why Finland's education system works better than ours | Adventures ... | Finland Education vs. American Education | Scoop.it
http://www.businessinsider.com/finlands-education-system-best-in-world-2012-11?op=1.
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What’s Next for Early Childhood Education in America?

What’s Next for Early Childhood Education in America? | Finland Education vs. American Education | Scoop.it
President Obama has jumpstarted the preschool trend, but will all the talk lead to a better education for our littlest learners?

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Common Core State Standards Content | Truth in American Education

@jasonglassIA @isaiahmcgee #CCSS folks seem to be in an echo chamber plenty of poor reviews out there, here's1 list - http://t.co/7kgScX1w...

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Shocking Report Explodes 5 Myths About American Education

Shocking Report Explodes 5 Myths About American Education | Finland Education vs. American Education | Scoop.it
We're number one? Hardly. The entire idea of American exceptionalism should be called into question.

Five myths about the American education system are 'demolished' in a report by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development "which compares the educational systems of over 30 developed nations, provides data that, when it comes to education, proves we're so frombeing number one, that the entire idea of American exceptionalism should be called into question."

Below are two of the myths. Click through to the article to see the other three as well as additional information on each of them.

Myth #1: Our educational system provides more upward mobility than any other in the world.

Myth #4: We provide excellent early childhood education.

Check out this article to find out where we statistically compared to other nations.


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Searching for Finland's Education Entrepreneurs

Searching for Finland's Education Entrepreneurs | Finland Education vs. American Education | Scoop.it
Last week, Annie Murphy Paul’s review of Amanda Ripley’s book, The Smartest Kids in the World, began with Ripley’s quote: “If you want the American dream, go to Finland.”It just so happened that I was there last week...

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Ruth Obadia's curator insight, August 28, 2013 2:35 PM

At this school, where his children attend, students from different grades are encouraged to share physical spaces and socialize. Much has been said about the lack of homework in favor of letting kids be kids and play. “In our education system, it’s all about trust and love.”

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Teacher Training in Finland: Reflections from a Recent Graduate

Teacher Training in Finland: Reflections from a Recent Graduate | Finland Education vs. American Education | Scoop.it
Finland believes in high-quality teacher education. Students apply to enter teacher colleges at the end of high school. The small nation’s eight teacher preparation institutions are highly selective. Only one of ten applicants is accepted, based on multiple measures, including an essay, an entry test, an interview, and evidence of a high motivation to teach. In addition to studying liberal arts subjects and the subjects they will teach, future teachers study pedagogy, theory, and conduct research about education. They learn how to teach students with disabilities. They take the study of education seriously. They practice teaching. Preparing to become a teacher takes five years. -Diane Ravitch 

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Elizabeth Louw's curator insight, March 26, 2015 3:55 PM

Taking the study of education seriously and  holding teachers in high esteem in society  just seem to make sense. It isn't the reality in many countries. 

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Let teachers teach, say Finns

Let teachers teach, say Finns | Finland Education vs. American Education | Scoop.it

In the second film in a series, BBC Wales education correspondent Arwyn Jones asks those in power in Finland how they maintain education standards as the country has topped international rankings in the past.

When the last set of Pisa results came out three years ago, Wales had slipped down the tables and is hoping for a better showing in the latest figures next week.


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Finland classroom success secrets, BBC special report - BBC News

Finland classroom success secrets, BBC special report - BBC News | Finland Education vs. American Education | Scoop.it
BBC News
Finland classroom success secrets, BBC special report
BBC News
When the last set of results came out three years ago, Wales had slipped down the tables.
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