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How to find and tell your story
Discovering the art of storytelling by showcasing methods, tips, & tools that help you find and tell your story, your way. Find me on Twitter @gimligoosetales
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Rescooped by Kim Zinke (aka Gimli Goose) from Just Story It Biz Storytelling
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The Identifiable Victim Effect and How It Affects Your Storytelling | Small Business Trends

The Identifiable Victim Effect and How It Affects Your Storytelling | Small Business Trends | How to find and tell your story | Scoop.it

"Psychologists have a term for our tendency to offer greater aid to an identifiable individual, compared to say, a large group of people. It’s called the Identifiable Victim Effect.  It is why charitable organizations use individuals instead of statistics in their campaigns."

 

Read the full article to find out why.


Via Karen Dietz
Kim Zinke (aka Gimli Goose)'s insight:

If a concept is too big, we can become overwhelmed.  It's easier to see how we could help one person, but it can be hard to see how we could help dozens, thousands, or millions.

 

Fellow curator Karen Deitz's comments (see below) summed up this article beautifully.

"One of the biggest mistakes I see that corporations, non-profits, and individuals make when sharing their business stories is they talk about 'a person' or 'a group' without giving them names and characteristics. In other words, whoever they are talking about are not identifiable.

 

If we don't have a name to hang on to, we can't connect. We want to connect with people. Without a name, 'a person' or 'a group' is just a concept."

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Karen Dietz's comment, June 25, 2013 1:36 PM
Yes Andrew and thank you for sharing! Part of moving from third-person language into 'I' language is the translation from business speak into conversational sharing. Your point is well made. Have a great week.
Carol Sanford's curator insight, June 27, 2013 1:01 PM

This is related to the brain's need to connect the absract and concrete. Innovation, learning and thinking anything new,  are all made possible by having an idea and making sense of it in our real lives. Storytelling is the same. The ideas in it need to be connected to concreteness, therefor a name, for it to 'sink in'.

Karen Dietz's comment, June 29, 2013 12:03 PM
So true Carol! I very much appreciate the comment and insight.
Rescooped by Kim Zinke (aka Gimli Goose) from Just Story It Biz Storytelling
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Data Coaching - Audio/Slides: The Marriage of Data & Story How To | Center for Effective Organizations

Data Coaching - Audio/Slides:  The Marriage of Data & Story How To | Center for Effective Organizations | How to find and tell your story | Scoop.it

Theresa Welbourne, CEO Research Professor, and Denise Avink of Northrop Grumman, spoke on October 27 on Data Coaching: A Cure for HR Data Analysis Paralysis?. They discussed ways to make HR data more relevant to the business and why data coaching is a must-have skill for HR, OD, and communications professionals as well as consultants and executive coaches. Theresa Welbourne shared the key aspects of data coaching and how it is being used by organizations who are adopting Fast HR practices to stay ahead of the competition.

 

Got data? Need to articulate its story? Then this article is for you!

 

Turning data into effective storytelling in order to create awareness, understanding, and action is a very tough job. But I am happy to say that processes and tools are emerging. Like the ones shared here!

 

This is a slide presentation along with an audio file of a webinar that focuses entirely on how to take big data and not only find its story, but share it as a story to generate meaning and action. It is a step-by-step process.

 

Hooray! I love the process and models shared here, along with how Northrum Grumman uses this process effectively.

 

Step one is gathering together the data. Step two is moving into dialog about it. Now here is where there might be a significant weakness. I did not listen to the 55+ minute audio file where the presenters might have explained this. But from what I can gather from the slides, dialog is mostly identified as focus groups.

 

Hmmmm -- seems more effort needs to be expended here in using Appreciative Inquiry to craft effective questions, evoke stories, and naturally spur action. So the model may need upgrading.

 

But if you have a bunch of data that you need to use to generate understanding and meaningful action, then this PPT can really help you.

 

And here is a link to a companion piece from Dr. Theresa M. Welbourne held a webinar entitled "Data Coaching is What's New."
She discussed data coaching as a must-have skill for HR, OD, and communications professionals as well as consultants and executive coaches. She shared the key aspects of data coaching and how it is being used by organizations who are adopting Fast HR practices to stay ahead of the competition.

http://ceo.usc.edu/news/webinar_data_coaching_a_cure_f.html ;

 

There is a wealth of material in both presentations that you won't want to miss and that will help you immensely.

 

Many thanks to colleague Lori Silverman for sending me the link and asking if I'd seen them yet.

 

Here is the link to the original article:

http://ceo.usc.edu/news/webinar_data_coaching.html ;

 

This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it ;


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Rescooped by Kim Zinke (aka Gimli Goose) from Just Story It Biz Storytelling
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Free Guide: Using Images for Visual Storytelling | CauseVox

Free Guide: Using Images for Visual Storytelling | CauseVox | How to find and tell your story | Scoop.it

One of the most effective ways to tell stories is through images. Images evoke emotion — the root of what drives your nonprofit or cause. We found this free guidebook developed by the Center for Social Impact Communication at Georgetown on how you can use images to create an impact. It walks you through the types of images you should be using and how you can systematically capture them.

 

Oooo, ooooo, ooooo -- I love free guides! And here's one on how you can use images to create visual stories, or to trigger a story within the reader's imagination.

 

Happy Friday and enjoy grabbing your free guide! I hope it helps you add fabulous visuals into your stories, or create compelling visual storytelling.


Via Karen Dietz
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Karen Dietz's comment, April 1, 2012 9:13 AM
Thanks Gimli!
Rescooped by Kim Zinke (aka Gimli Goose) from Just Story It Biz Storytelling
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The Art of Storytelling (Infographic) | Adaptive Iterations

The Art of Storytelling (Infographic) | Adaptive Iterations | How to find and tell your story | Scoop.it
via flickr.com Love this set of doodles from Sunni Brown on the art of storytelling by Robert McKee. All businesses should take the art of storytelling seriously, it really can set you apart from the competition.

 

There are great points about story here for every business person. I particularly like, "Don't imitate anyone," and "It's not language, it's far beyond that."

 

Keep this one for your infographics file :)


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Rescooped by Kim Zinke (aka Gimli Goose) from Just Story It Biz Storytelling
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How To Tell A Story - 10 Simple Strategies | Change This

This is a Change This PDF that you can view here:

http://changethis.com/manifesto/98.01.StoryWars/pdf/98.01.StoryWars.pdf ;

 

I'm curating this because I like it and I don't like it -- and it is worth taking a look at the assumptions going on in this piece so we can get really smart.

 

This piece was put together by Jonathan Sachs, author of Winning The Story Wars. Sachs comes from the world of marketing and branding and this is reflected in his point of view.

 

Let's get what I don't like out of the way so I can chat about what I do like. Here is what puts my teeth on edge:


1. Sachs states that "we live in a world that has lost its connection to traditional myths and we are now trying to find new ones..." Welllllllll, if your slice of reality is the Hollywood, advertising, and branding world it is easy to get sucked into this notion. But we know from Jung, other psychologists, Folklorists, Anthroplogists, and neuroscience how this is not true. There is great irony in this "myth" that Sachs is perpetuating.


2. We are engaged in a war. Hmmmmm. Well, for millenium people have wanted to gain the attention of other people -- so nothing new there. Is this a war?  Could be. But if we are wanting to employ the power of storytelling to find solutions and create change as Sachs advocates, then war does not speak to the greater good but instead speaks to winners and losers where ongoing resentment is inherently built in. That sounds like the perpetuation of war -- same old same old. 

 

3. Sach's relationship to storytelling is still at the transactional level -- I'll tell you a story and you'll do what I want. While what he really wants it seems is storytelling at the transformational level. That requires a different mind-set and different story skills -- deep listening, engagement, story sharing, etc. And he completely ignores the relational level of storytelling.


4. Reliance on the Hero's Journey as the only story archetype to follow. Well, that's a narrow slice of reality and one geared towards youth. Yet other story archetypes are desperately needed: King/Queen, Trickster, Magician for example in order to affect change.

 

5. As a result, his 10 simple strategies stay at the transactional level with a few geared towards transformation (figure out what you stand for, declare your moral, reveal the moral). Now any great professional storyteller will tell you these that I've mentioned are essential for any compelling storytelling session. So they land in both worlds of transactional and transformational storytelling.


OK -- on to what I do like!


If you want to be heard, you'd better learn to tell better stories. The solutions to our significant problems these days depends on our ability to tell great stories and inspire people to think differently. Storytelling does not take long to learn, but it does take a lifetime to master, Know what a story is and is not Our abilitiy to disseminate stories is greater now than in the past -- because of technology. That is just a reminder to expend your use of different channels in sharing your stories that are now available to us.

 

Enough! Go read this piece yourself and decide what you think about it. It's a quick read.

 

This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it ;


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Meri Walker's comment, September 20, 2012 10:15 AM
Well, Karen! You made my day offering this terrific new Scoop. I'm enriched by the way you think, Karen. Especially about story... I guess we get really "bent" in a certain way by anthropological training and it's still pretty rare to find others who are looking through the kinds of filters you and I have installed in Mind. De-light-ful learning with and from you!
Jane Dunnewold's comment, April 8, 2013 1:42 PM
I'm behind the curve on this one, being new to scoop it - but as a teacher/artist I have to agree with your observation that delving into other archetypes would present rich opportunities to "language" storytelling in lots of environments. I use archetypes to get at the fears and struggles artists face in my workshops - and they aren't all about the hero's path! The Damsel in Distress is one that comes to mind...
Karen Dietz's comment, April 8, 2013 1:56 PM
I agree Jane. Archetypes can be so helpful in many ways. One of the ones I love for artists is the Trickster archetype, and the Magician. LOL on the 'damsel in distress'! Time to go put my 'big girl' panties on and deal with the next challenge :)
Rescooped by Kim Zinke (aka Gimli Goose) from Just Story It Biz Storytelling
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Search Stories | Google Video Creator

Search Stories | Google Video Creator | How to find and tell your story | Scoop.it

Welcome to the Search Stories Video Creator. Just type in your searches and select the kind of results that best communicate your story. Then, share your story with the world.

 

Ha ha ha -- I just spent several hours creating 7 very short videos about business storytelling -- and had a ton of fun using Google's Search Stories Video Creator!!

 

These are micro-stories, each with a beginning, middle, and an end.  All but 3 contain a context, premise, problem, and solution. And I'll re-do those 3 tomorrow so they are stories rather than promos.

 

See, you CAN share a mini-business story using some of these new technologies!

 

This tool is so easy to use it takes no time at all. And I now have a YouTube channel :)) 

 

What a total hoot. I couldn't stop giggling every time I made one. Go check them out and tell me what you think. Then go make some of your own!

 

http://www.youtube.com/channel/UCIh_gUpWhDmhdp0XuMFPQ_Q?feature=mhee 

 

Many many thanks to fellow curator Robin Good for adding this site to his collection where I found it at http://presentationtools.masternewmedia.org/ ;

 

Google's promo http://googleblog.blogspot.ca/2010/04/make-your-own-search-story-video-in.html#!/2010/04/make-your-own-search-story-video-in.html


Via Karen Dietz
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Karen Dietz's comment, April 13, 2012 2:47 PM
Thank you Silvia!
Kim Zinke (aka Gimli Goose)'s comment, April 15, 2012 2:50 PM
Karen - this was a lot of fun! And I enjoyed watching the videos you created. It gave me some great ideas on how to create my own. - Thanks! Kim
Karen Dietz's comment, April 15, 2012 5:43 PM
Wonderful Kim! I have some more planned. So glad it gave you ideas for using it. Keep having fun :)
Rescooped by Kim Zinke (aka Gimli Goose) from Just Story It Biz Storytelling
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The 6 C's of Story Branding: A Breakthrough Approach To Identify & Develop A Compelling Brand Story | Bulldog Reporter

The 6 C's of Story Branding: A Breakthrough Approach To Identify & Develop A Compelling Brand Story | Bulldog Reporter | How to find and tell your story | Scoop.it

Stories don't tell us how to think or what to value. Rather, they provide a welcomed freedom to self-select the truths we read into them. This is why they can be immensely powerful.

 

Too often we think of 'story branding' as 'story pushing.' But I love what the author Jim Signorelli says, "In many ways, stories provide a great example for brands to follow. Brands, like stories, also contain truths. But whose truth is it, the brand's or ours? It is one thing for brands to push their meanings on us, and quite another to help us to our own conclusions." In the author's view, if approached properly, story branding avoids this whole 'pushing' dynamic.

 

So do you want to creat a brand story for your business? Then create a Story Brief first. This article talks about how to do just that. I really like this concept, and the beginning steps the author suggests. 


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Karen Dietz's comment, March 16, 2012 9:06 AM
Thank you for the re-scoop!