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How to find and tell your story
Discovering the art of storytelling by showcasing methods, tips, & tools that help you find and tell your story, your way. Find me on Twitter @gimligoosetales
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Rescooped by Kim Zinke (aka Gimli Goose) from Just Story It Biz Storytelling
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The Identifiable Victim Effect and How It Affects Your Storytelling | Small Business Trends

The Identifiable Victim Effect and How It Affects Your Storytelling | Small Business Trends | How to find and tell your story | Scoop.it

"Psychologists have a term for our tendency to offer greater aid to an identifiable individual, compared to say, a large group of people. It’s called the Identifiable Victim Effect.  It is why charitable organizations use individuals instead of statistics in their campaigns."

 

Read the full article to find out why.


Via Karen Dietz
Kim Zinke (aka Gimli Goose)'s insight:

If a concept is too big, we can become overwhelmed.  It's easier to see how we could help one person, but it can be hard to see how we could help dozens, thousands, or millions.

 

Fellow curator Karen Deitz's comments (see below) summed up this article beautifully.

"One of the biggest mistakes I see that corporations, non-profits, and individuals make when sharing their business stories is they talk about 'a person' or 'a group' without giving them names and characteristics. In other words, whoever they are talking about are not identifiable.

 

If we don't have a name to hang on to, we can't connect. We want to connect with people. Without a name, 'a person' or 'a group' is just a concept."

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Karen Dietz's comment, June 25, 2013 4:36 PM
Yes Andrew and thank you for sharing! Part of moving from third-person language into 'I' language is the translation from business speak into conversational sharing. Your point is well made. Have a great week.
Carol Sanford's curator insight, June 27, 2013 4:01 PM

This is related to the brain's need to connect the absract and concrete. Innovation, learning and thinking anything new,  are all made possible by having an idea and making sense of it in our real lives. Storytelling is the same. The ideas in it need to be connected to concreteness, therefor a name, for it to 'sink in'.

Karen Dietz's comment, June 29, 2013 3:03 PM
So true Carol! I very much appreciate the comment and insight.
Rescooped by Kim Zinke (aka Gimli Goose) from Just Story It Biz Storytelling
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How To Tell A Story - 10 Simple Strategies | Change This

This is a Change This PDF that you can view here:

http://changethis.com/manifesto/98.01.StoryWars/pdf/98.01.StoryWars.pdf ;

 

I'm curating this because I like it and I don't like it -- and it is worth taking a look at the assumptions going on in this piece so we can get really smart.

 

This piece was put together by Jonathan Sachs, author of Winning The Story Wars. Sachs comes from the world of marketing and branding and this is reflected in his point of view.

 

Let's get what I don't like out of the way so I can chat about what I do like. Here is what puts my teeth on edge:


1. Sachs states that "we live in a world that has lost its connection to traditional myths and we are now trying to find new ones..." Welllllllll, if your slice of reality is the Hollywood, advertising, and branding world it is easy to get sucked into this notion. But we know from Jung, other psychologists, Folklorists, Anthroplogists, and neuroscience how this is not true. There is great irony in this "myth" that Sachs is perpetuating.


2. We are engaged in a war. Hmmmmm. Well, for millenium people have wanted to gain the attention of other people -- so nothing new there. Is this a war?  Could be. But if we are wanting to employ the power of storytelling to find solutions and create change as Sachs advocates, then war does not speak to the greater good but instead speaks to winners and losers where ongoing resentment is inherently built in. That sounds like the perpetuation of war -- same old same old. 

 

3. Sach's relationship to storytelling is still at the transactional level -- I'll tell you a story and you'll do what I want. While what he really wants it seems is storytelling at the transformational level. That requires a different mind-set and different story skills -- deep listening, engagement, story sharing, etc. And he completely ignores the relational level of storytelling.


4. Reliance on the Hero's Journey as the only story archetype to follow. Well, that's a narrow slice of reality and one geared towards youth. Yet other story archetypes are desperately needed: King/Queen, Trickster, Magician for example in order to affect change.

 

5. As a result, his 10 simple strategies stay at the transactional level with a few geared towards transformation (figure out what you stand for, declare your moral, reveal the moral). Now any great professional storyteller will tell you these that I've mentioned are essential for any compelling storytelling session. So they land in both worlds of transactional and transformational storytelling.


OK -- on to what I do like!


If you want to be heard, you'd better learn to tell better stories. The solutions to our significant problems these days depends on our ability to tell great stories and inspire people to think differently. Storytelling does not take long to learn, but it does take a lifetime to master, Know what a story is and is not Our abilitiy to disseminate stories is greater now than in the past -- because of technology. That is just a reminder to expend your use of different channels in sharing your stories that are now available to us.

 

Enough! Go read this piece yourself and decide what you think about it. It's a quick read.

 

This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it ;


Via Karen Dietz
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Meri Walker's comment, September 20, 2012 1:15 PM
Well, Karen! You made my day offering this terrific new Scoop. I'm enriched by the way you think, Karen. Especially about story... I guess we get really "bent" in a certain way by anthropological training and it's still pretty rare to find others who are looking through the kinds of filters you and I have installed in Mind. De-light-ful learning with and from you!
Jane Dunnewold's comment, April 8, 2013 4:42 PM
I'm behind the curve on this one, being new to scoop it - but as a teacher/artist I have to agree with your observation that delving into other archetypes would present rich opportunities to "language" storytelling in lots of environments. I use archetypes to get at the fears and struggles artists face in my workshops - and they aren't all about the hero's path! The Damsel in Distress is one that comes to mind...
Karen Dietz's comment, April 8, 2013 4:56 PM
I agree Jane. Archetypes can be so helpful in many ways. One of the ones I love for artists is the Trickster archetype, and the Magician. LOL on the 'damsel in distress'! Time to go put my 'big girl' panties on and deal with the next challenge :)
Rescooped by Kim Zinke (aka Gimli Goose) from Just Story It Biz Storytelling
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The Five Biggest Mistakes CEOs Make in Speaking | Decker

The Five Biggest Mistakes CEOs Make in Speaking | Decker | How to find and tell your story | Scoop.it
Most CEOs are not inspiring. After years of working with leaders in business, it's hard to come to any other conclusion.

 

The 5 mistakes listed here are right on -- I experience them all the time when working with my coaching clients.

 

Number 4 is -- CEOs don't tell stories. That's for sure.

Number 5 is -- CEO's reading speeches instead of talking authentically with their audiences.

Number 3 is -- they are too stiff (that comes from not telling stories or not knowing how to tell stories)

Number 2 is -- they don't write their own material. No one can write your personal stories for you, BTW.

Number 1 is -- CEOs are not conveying a vision. Hey, we want to be inspired!

 

Well, for sure many business people of all types suffer from the same mistakes. So what to do? Find the stories you are passionate about telling, learn to tell them well and authentically, leave the notes at home, and please -- don't practice in front of a mirror! That's the kiss of death.

 

There are many more insights here in this article about how these mistakes show up for people, so go grab them.

 

Review written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it ;


Via Karen Dietz
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Rescooped by Kim Zinke (aka Gimli Goose) from Just Story It Biz Storytelling
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Create Stunning Custom [Story] Word Clouds: Tagxedo

Create Stunning Custom [Story] Word Clouds: Tagxedo | How to find and tell your story | Scoop.it

What I love to do is take a story text and create a word cloud. It's fun and a different way to create a story graphic when you need to. Now comes along a great free tool to do this even better! Read the review below from Robin Good:

 

From fellow curator Robin Good: Tagxedo is a great, free web-based tool that allows you to create stunning covers, images for articles or posters, based exclusively on words.

 

You can either input the words yourself, or provide a website URL, a Twitter account, a news or web search and Tagxedo will create a "word cloud" by tapping into that word "universe".

 

There dozens of different controls to customize your word-art creations including the ability to change layout, fonts, colors, shapes and even density of your artwork.

 

The final work can be shared easily on social media or saved in your preferred graphic file format (jpg or png) and at your desired resolution.

You can see some examples here: http://www.tagxedo.com/gallery.html ;

 

or try it out immediately here: http://www.tagxedo.com/app.html ;

 

More info: http://www.tagxedo.com/  ;


Via Robin Good, Karen Dietz
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Dr. Laura Sheneman's curator insight, May 20, 2013 9:14 AM

I love Wordle.  So, I really love this idea of incorporating shapes.

Begoña Iturgaitz's curator insight, May 20, 2013 9:52 AM

Aladatuta ikusten dugu Tagxedo aplikazioa. Askoz ere itxurosoago, baina orain arte bezain erabilerraza.

Mario Castillo's curator insight, December 1, 2013 11:10 PM

Another word cloud- similar to Wordle.

Rescooped by Kim Zinke (aka Gimli Goose) from Just Story It Biz Storytelling
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How To Ask --And Listen --Like You Mean It | Fast Company

How To Ask --And Listen --Like You Mean It | Fast Company | How to find and tell your story | Scoop.it

Questions are the expressive, probing language for growing others; listening is the receptive, facilitating language for growing others. These two complementary approaches form a continuous growth conversation loop.

 

Leaders who are helping others to grow and innovate are always trying to craft the best questions to make a difference. Here's how to ask the questions that will propel your team and your organization forward.

 

Listening -- I mean listening really well -- is sometimes hard to do. Here's a great article by Kevin Cashman, author of The Pause Principle, reminding us that the more deeply and authentically we can listen to another, the deeper our questions go, and the deeper our understanding becomes.

 

Listening deeply is the first storytelling skill to build -- so you know which story to share or ask for. And then so you can dig more deeply into the story to understand what it really means.

 

For leaders, this is essential. For anyone wanting to master business storytelling, it is critical. Many marketing and branding folks have still not caught on to listening as being a vital component when using stories.

 

Sooooo -- here's a reminder that also contains some great insights, a list of what not to do, and a nice section on the power of authentic questions.

 

Now I'll go on a hunt and see if I can find an article for you just on the Art of the Question. For as they say in Appreciative Inquiry, the question is the intervention -- so knowing how to craft and ask the question is key.

 

In the meantime, enjoy this article.

 

This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it ;


Via Karen Dietz
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Rescooped by Kim Zinke (aka Gimli Goose) from Just Story It Biz Storytelling
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The Most Powerful Thing About You | Leadership Freak

The Most Powerful Thing About You | Leadership Freak | How to find and tell your story | Scoop.it

The most powerful thing about you is your story. But don't talk about yourself all the time; you'll be a bore.

Well, that all depends on whether it is all about you bring the "center of attention" or the "center or exposure". "Exposure" mesans being vulnerable and also being willing to be changed by the story. That is what this article is really all about. And it is also the essence of the talk I am on my way to give at the Pacificaa Graduate Iinstitute's conference on transformational leaderships this weekend.

The questions posed here will help you keep on track and avoid situations where you end ups telling your story from your ego instead of the place of service. It is a great checklist to keep in your back pocket.

Happy story telling!

Thank you Richard Andrews for recommending this article :)

This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it


Via Karen Dietz
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Ken Morrison's comment, June 7, 2012 6:11 PM
I love the Leadership Freak blog. Thanks for sharing.
Karen Dietz's comment, June 7, 2012 11:44 PM
Glad you like it Ken! Thanks for re-scooping the article. Have a great weekend :)
Rescooped by Kim Zinke (aka Gimli Goose) from Just Story It Biz Storytelling
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The 6 C's of Story Branding: A Breakthrough Approach To Identify & Develop A Compelling Brand Story | Bulldog Reporter

The 6 C's of Story Branding: A Breakthrough Approach To Identify & Develop A Compelling Brand Story | Bulldog Reporter | How to find and tell your story | Scoop.it

Stories don't tell us how to think or what to value. Rather, they provide a welcomed freedom to self-select the truths we read into them. This is why they can be immensely powerful.

 

Too often we think of 'story branding' as 'story pushing.' But I love what the author Jim Signorelli says, "In many ways, stories provide a great example for brands to follow. Brands, like stories, also contain truths. But whose truth is it, the brand's or ours? It is one thing for brands to push their meanings on us, and quite another to help us to our own conclusions." In the author's view, if approached properly, story branding avoids this whole 'pushing' dynamic.

 

So do you want to creat a brand story for your business? Then create a Story Brief first. This article talks about how to do just that. I really like this concept, and the beginning steps the author suggests. 


Via Karen Dietz
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Karen Dietz's comment, March 16, 2012 12:06 PM
Thank you for the re-scoop!
Rescooped by Kim Zinke (aka Gimli Goose) from Just Story It Biz Storytelling
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Once upon a Time at the Office: Learning to Recognize, Interpret and Tell Stories in Organizations | Northwestern

Once upon a Time at the Office: Learning to Recognize, Interpret and Tell Stories in Organizations | Northwestern | How to find and tell your story | Scoop.it

This study investigates the use of narrative in organizations by (1) examining current organizational storytelling practices in a variety of industries and (2) identifying key features that characterize stories with powerful impact. Sixty survey respondents reported narrative is used by leaders to transfer knowledge, shape culture, and motivate or curtail employee behavior, as well as by employees to manage stress. Interviews with eight experts on narrative revealed, perhaps surprisingly, that skimping on details is what makes stories powerful.

 

Consider this post more a long-read but rich with great material. I love the bar charts about the findings, and the articulation of exactly what makes stories 'stick.'

 

The insights are all replicatable for your business.

 

Yes, this article is in academic-speak. But don't let that stop you. It's solid research that we can all use to help us get smarter about biz storytelling, and/or to storify to share with clients.

 

Good job!


Via Karen Dietz
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Karen Dietz's comment, March 11, 2012 9:19 PM
Glad you like this one too!