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How to find and tell your story
Discovering the art of storytelling by showcasing methods, tips, & tools that help you find and tell your story, your way. Find me on Twitter @gimligoosetales
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What’s Your Story? 5 Great Social Story-telling Sites | Social Web Daily | MyLife’s Social BlogSocial Web Daily

What’s Your Story? 5 Great Social Story-telling Sites | Social Web Daily | MyLife’s Social BlogSocial Web Daily | How to find and tell your story | Scoop.it

Storytelling has been around since the dawn of time, but it has really taken ahold of our culture with the advent of the Internet. Of course, we can credit a fair bit of the story-telling phenomenon to social media. Here are some of our favorite social-media-fueled ‘story-telling’ tools:

- storify

- mylife.com

- path

- daytum

- proust

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58 Sites for Digital Storytelling Tools and Information | A Media Specialist's Guide to the Internet

58 Sites for Digital Storytelling Tools and Information | A Media Specialist's Guide to the Internet | How to find and tell your story | Scoop.it

Judy Greller's award-winning blog with resources galore in numerous areas. This page contains a wonderful collection of links to sites related to Digital Storytelling. -JL


Via Ms. Hall, lharvey, Louise Robinson-Lay, Jim Lerman
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What Story Will You Tell This Summer? | Nonprofit Marketing Guide

What Story Will You Tell This Summer? | Nonprofit Marketing Guide | How to find and tell your story | Scoop.it

[use this exercise outlined in the article as a guide to creating any story you want to spread out over an extended time period]

 

This exercise begins by sketching out a story you want to tell to supporters over  the summer.

 

This is what we call a communications arc. You pick an overarching story you want to tell over the course of several weeks or months, then you break that larger story down into smaller stories that you put on to your editorial calendar and into your specific communications channels (like your website, Facebook, email newsletter, etc.).

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Picture this: Expert opinions on telling your story with images | Katya's Non-Profit Marketing Blog

Picture this: Expert opinions on telling your story with images | Katya's Non-Profit Marketing Blog | How to find and tell your story | Scoop.it

Telling your story with riveting images. Here’s everything you always wanted to know about the topic from an exceptional range of experts. I’ve arranged the posts into three parts—inspiration, tips and resources.

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Six Core Storytelling Competencies: Good… Better… Best | Storyfix

Six Core Storytelling Competencies: Good… Better… Best | Storyfix | How to find and tell your story | Scoop.it

Ask anyone who writes fiction how many issues an author needs to think about, how much stuff there is to know and execute, and you may get an answer that amounts to dozens, even hundreds of things. That's pretty accurate actually.

 

All of those dozens of things, or hundreds of things, can be categorized into six discrete buckets of elements, nuances and requisite functions, each of which is essential to a successful story. I call them the Six Core Competencies of successful storytelling, and they really do cover the whole fiction enchilada.

 

Think of something you need to know, and it’ll fall into one of those six buckets.

That said, each of them is a matter of degree. For each thing within any of the six buckets, you can cover the base, or you can hit it out of the park.  What follows is offered as a sort of checklist, organized as a good, better and best description under each of the Six Core Competencies. That’s 18 opportunities to improve your story.

- concept

- character

- theme

- structure

- scene execution

- writing voice

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7 ways to become a masterful storyteller | Ragan

7 ways to become a masterful storyteller | Ragan | How to find and tell your story | Scoop.it

Justina Chen, an author of books for young adults and formerly executive communications manager at Microsoft, detailed ways communicators can become better storytellers themselves, and can turn their managers and executives into better storytellers, too. Here are seven of the biggest transformation tips:

- build myths

- consider your intentions

- find the superstars

- find the soul keeper of your company

- be a magpie

- be fearless

- embrace chaos

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Great Storytelling is a Performance | Beautiful Books

Great Storytelling is a Performance | Beautiful Books | How to find and tell your story | Scoop.it

Here's one big secret that the experts like to keep to themselves. Teachers, speech-language pathologists, and many others know that great storytelling for learning is no accident. It’s not difficult or time consuming, BUT it takes just the right attitude. All the great educators know that great storytelling is a performance.

 

Here are three easy steps that you can follow to help you get ready for your performance:

- read the script and make it your own

- be at your best

- perform, baby

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Business Storytelling Series: Telling the Story in Your Organization | Cornerstone

Business Storytelling Series: Telling the Story in Your Organization | Cornerstone | How to find and tell your story | Scoop.it

Increasing business storytelling in your own outlook and in all levels of your organization will create a richer, more engaged environment and will help you sell more product. It’s a sure-fire method for creating culture…the culture you want.

 

How can you increase the storytelling culture within your organization? Here are 11 tips to help you and others in telling the story.

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A Week's Worth of Journaling Prompts: Writing Legacy Letters | Writing Through Life

A Week's Worth of Journaling Prompts: Writing Legacy Letters | Writing Through Life | How to find and tell your story | Scoop.it

The power of Legacy Letters is to explore aspects of ourselves and our life experiences we wish to preserve for the future—whether it’s as a gift for friends and family members or a gift for ourselves to facilitate future memoir writing.

 

Everything we write—letters, poems, journals, fiction, and nonfiction—if kept, becomes a legacy for the future.  These 7 journaling prompts will help you write your own Legacy Letter(s). Freewrite for ten to twenty minutes exploring the questions and issues raised by each of the prompts.

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Memoir Writing Tips for Creating Story Structure and the Narrative Arc | Memories and Memoirs

Memoir Writing Tips for Creating Story Structure and the Narrative Arc | Memories and Memoirs | How to find and tell your story | Scoop.it

Memoir writers struggle with plot and structure for a very good reason: they think they know the plot.  They assume that writing “what happened” is enough to create a memoir, and think that putting journal entries into the computer can be their memoir. A memoir is a story.

 

Included in the article are: some tips for thinking about story and plot, focusing your theme in the arc, and three acts of dramatic structure.

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Redrafting your life writing - key elements | ebooks4writers

Redrafting your life writing - key elements | ebooks4writers | How to find and tell your story | Scoop.it

After writing and gathering your life experiences, how will you tackle the redrafting to create an engaging story?

 

Once you have done a lot of writing and drawn out a wealth of material, the next stage is to think about how to form it into a story. While it’s in its raw form, what you have is a repository of memories particular to you. If you want to create something that others will enjoy reading, these are the elements you need:

1. Structure, pacing and tension

2. Details and descriptions

3. Bring your characters alive

4. Dialogue

5. Theme - why are telling this story?

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Storytelling Resources | Digital Storytelling Project

This lengthy list covers categories like:

- general storytelling

- storytelling organizations/discussion lists

- warm-up exercises

- creative dramatics

- tale type, motif indexes, and folklore research

- ethics resources

- working with audiences

- storytelling in schools & curricula

 

and much, much more

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Using Google Docs to Create Digital Kits for Student Projects | The Tempered Radical

Using Google Docs to Create Digital Kits for Student Projects | The Tempered Radical | How to find and tell your story | Scoop.it

One of the most valuable #edtech lessons that I ever learned came from Hall Davidson, who suggests that teachers interested in incorporating digital storytelling projects into their classrooms create digital kits that students can use as starting points for their efforts.

 

Digital kits are nothing more than collections of content -- still images, video clips, audio clips, passages of text -- connected to the topic being studied that teachers assemble for their kids before a project even begins.  Then, students use the content in digital kits to assemble their final products.  What I love the best about using digital kits to structure student projects is that they speed up the process of creating influential visuals.  Instead of spending days searching for content, students using preassembled digital kits are freed to think about the topic of study immediately.

 

Here's how to create your own digital kits using a little collaboration and Google Docs.

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Digital Storytelling | Educational Technology in ELT

Digital Storytelling | Educational Technology in ELT | How to find and tell your story | Scoop.it

I have just come back from IATEFL Glasgow 2012, where I presented on Digital Storytelling for the Technology and Teens Symposium.  The presentation focused on ways of implementing digital storytelling with teens. I described what I believe are its benefits and then showed three examples of projects I did with my students in Buenos Aires.  I've listed 10 digital storytelling tools you can use and my slidedeck.

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Writing Inspiration: How to Find Your Muse and Develop a Story | Knoji

Writing Inspiration: How to Find Your Muse and Develop a Story | Knoji | How to find and tell your story | Scoop.it

People often ask where writers find inspiration, and what motivates them to develop a storyline. If you're a writer who wants to find their muse, the answer may be to stop staring at a blank page and make your environment and mind open to creativity. Here's some ideas on how to bring out your inner storyteller.

- movement

- people watching

- keep busy

- environment

- be prepared

- look at the obvious

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What’s Your Story, Morning Glory? Building the Story Behind Your Personal Brand | Aspyre Solutions

What’s Your Story, Morning Glory? Building the Story Behind Your Personal Brand | Aspyre Solutions | How to find and tell your story | Scoop.it

Simple Steps to Create and Refine Your Own Brand Story.

 

So how do you go about putting together your story? You might know what your story is all about, but the important piece here that really makes it an effective tool is in how you communicate it in a way that will be relevant and interesting to your target audience. If you want to create a really great personal brand, try crafting your story with the following 6 elements in mind.

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Article Writing: How To Start Your Story-Based Articles With Greater Impact | Psychotactics

Article Writing: How To Start Your Story-Based Articles With Greater Impact | Psychotactics | How to find and tell your story | Scoop.it

Article Writing and Story Telling: You can pick any story, or any subset of a story to get the drama going. And you often find this drama somewhere in the middle of your story. The most important factor is one of enthusiasm.

 

To get that drama, you don’t have to pick anything particularly exciting. You just have to make it exciting for me.  In a story, you have at least three-four exciting points and any one of them can rise to the surface. Yes, any point is exciting. What really matters, is how you bring a factor of excitement to the story. As you explain the details, the simple fact becomes interesting.

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Applying Fiction Storytelling Tips to Content Marketing | Kuno Creative

Applying Fiction Storytelling Tips to Content Marketing | Kuno Creative | How to find and tell your story | Scoop.it

Content Marketing strives to intrigue readers, encourage sharing and prompting conversions. To do so, storytelling is eminent.  Following are a few tips for implementing storytelling into your nonfiction works of content marketing, including (but not limited to) blogs, case studies, and eBooks.

- make the reader care

- make a promise to the reader

- make your audience work for it

- make the audience share what they have found

- make sure to remember - these are guidelines, not rules

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Crappy First Drafts of Great Books | Psychology Today

Crappy First Drafts of Great Books | Psychology Today | How to find and tell your story | Scoop.it

Good books begin as bad drafts.  The next time you are struggling with your own writing—if only in an important email or Facebook post—recall this selection of pages from the drafts of great novels. Take solace in the fact that almost all the stories you love began as bad first drafts. And ask yourself, "If writing is a struggle for immortals like Proust and Dickens, why should it be different for me?"

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You Are Your Words | iLearn Technology

You Are Your Words | iLearn Technology | How to find and tell your story | Scoop.it

[You are your words is a neat way to tell a story through image. Although the article is aimed at students, this format and the ideas presented in the post could be used by any individual or groups.]

 

The American Heritage Dictionary has a new webtool that lets students create a self-portrait using their words.  Students can link to places where they have already written (Facebook or Twitter) or write something unique specifically for their portrait.  The unique image can be shared, saved and printed.

 

Also included in this post are ideas on how to integrate You Are Your Words into the classroom or any other group setting.

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Extending the narrative | Seth Godin

Extending the narrative | Seth Godin | How to find and tell your story | Scoop.it

Did you wake up fresh today, a new start, a blank slate with resources and opportunities... or is today yet another day of living out the narrative you've been engaged in for years?

 

It's painful to even consider giving up the narrative we use to navigate our life. We vividly remember the last time we made an investment that didn't match our self-story, or the last time we went to the 'wrong' restaurant or acted the 'wrong' way in a sales call.  So we play it safe and go back to our story.

The truth though, is that doing what you've been doing is going to get you what you've been getting. If the narrative is getting in the way, if the archetypes you've been modeling and the worldview you've been nursing no longer match the culture, the economy or your goals, something's got to give.

 

When patterns in engagments with the people around you become well-worn and ineffective, are they persistent because they have to be, or because the story demands it?

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Importance of Storytelling in Social Media | Mind Jumpers

Importance of Storytelling in Social Media | Mind Jumpers | How to find and tell your story | Scoop.it

An aspect of social media that is often overlooked, is its role in the evolution of storytelling. Social media have made us all to storytellers.

 

Here are 5 ways you can practice the art of storytelling in your content creation to see more success with your social media networks.

1. Tap user-generated content

2. Make content personal

3. Respond to news content

4. Use real life examples

5. Talk like a human

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Turning life’s lessons into inspirational stories of identity | John Sadowsky

Turning life’s lessons into inspirational stories of identity | John Sadowsky | How to find and tell your story | Scoop.it

People of true influence usually do not have a past that is more interesting, noteworthy, or “usable” than that of their peers. They are simply better at recognizing the lessons of their lives and at expressing those lessons to others.

 

Learning to process one’s life lessons is a central element of the phenomenon I call “leading by autobiography”. Because they continuously process their life lessons, leaders develop clear views about who they are and what they believe, and they are conscious of the influences that have molded them into the people they have become.

 

While examples from well-known world and business leaders are enlightening, learning to lead by autobiography is not only for the famous. Anyone, at any level of an organization and at any point in a career, can begin with the concepts and questions enumerated above, and evolve from there.

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