How to find and tell your story
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How to find and tell your story
Discovering the art of storytelling by showcasing methods, tips, & tools that help you find and tell your story, your way.  Find me on Twitter @gimligoosetales
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Back to the Future: How to Reinvent Your Brand Story | Forbes

Back to the Future: How to Reinvent Your Brand Story | Forbes | How to find and tell your story | Scoop.it

Storytelling is a hot business trend for a reason. In the face of growing cynicism and distrust, stores are how people decide if they belong in your tribe.  Today, your brand story is how you distinguish yourself from the storm of information overload and attention deficit.

 

Every brand has a founding myth, an epic narrative that explains how it came to be in this world. It’s important because it explains why you do what you do. If you’re clear about the end product you’re trying to create, you can use the past to help tell the story of your future.  Here are 5 key questions that will help you get going:

- What is the source of your materials or ingredients?

- Who’s in your brand’s cast of characters?

- What is your brand’s heritage or pedigree?

- What quest have you been on?

- Can you give people a glimpse the shadow?

 

And regardless of how you do it, here’s the end goal: tell a story that people can identify with as their own. If you can do that, then the need to persuade, convince or sell them on anything disappears.

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Sales Advice: Fix Your Storytelling | Best Outsourcing Partners

Sales Advice: Fix Your Storytelling | Best Outsourcing Partners | How to find and tell your story | Scoop.it

There are three key skills that define a great salesperson, the ability to:  ask great questions, listen actively, and tell great stories.

 

Get your customers and prospects to tell you stories through open-ended questions. Target the two emotional levers: issues of pain and gain.  Those two different stories are going to paint the bigger picture for you. They also help customers reinforce in their own minds where they need to invest. If you connect them with the right story, the answer will be your product or service.

 

Here’s what you should be doing to craft a great sales story:

- Begin with the end in mind

- Have great characters

- Give your characters goals and a vision

- Give your characters obstacles

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Storytelling: A Trip Down Memory Lane | B2E

Storytelling: A Trip Down Memory Lane | B2E | How to find and tell your story | Scoop.it

When you think about all the stories you heard growing up, what comes to mind?

 

Childhood stories provided guidance for us when we were young. There was a moral to each story – a life lesson that we learned along the way – to help guide our actions and direct how we should behave. While the storyline may have changed, stories can still provide guidance to us as adults.

 

Stories that engage employees and drive business or transformational change are well-written, meaningful and motivating. They inspire an action, provoke thought and translate across multiple channels and geographies.  When developing a strong story, keep these 7 simple principles in mind:

- identify a clear theme

- decide what's at stake

- establish a story arc - beginning, middle and end

- make critical choices

- show, don't tell

- use video to make stories more meaningful and engaging

- end strong

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Tell Your Story – Ideas for using Social Media | NAS Talent Talk

Tell Your Story – Ideas for using Social Media | NAS Talent Talk | How to find and tell your story | Scoop.it

What do your recruitment communications channels say about your organization’s identity?

 

One of the easiest ways to ensure consistent identity is to begin telling your company’s story and sharing what your workforce culture is really like through social media.  Here are a variety of ways to share your story through texts, tweets, blogs, videos, podcasts and pictures.

- your leader's stories

- your employees’ career-path stories

- your customer's stories

- your employees giving back to the community

- video contests

- pictures

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Kurt Vonnegut’s 8 Tips on How to Write a Great Story | Brain Pickings

Kurt Vonnegut’s 8 Tips on How to Write a Great Story | Brain Pickings | How to find and tell your story | Scoop.it

"Write to please just one person.  If you open a window and make love to the world, so to speak, your story will get pneumonia."

 

Writing advice from Kurt Vonnegut.

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The Storytelling Mandala: Purpose-Inspired Transmedia Storytelling | Gauravonomics

The Storytelling Mandala: Purpose-Inspired Transmedia Storytelling | Gauravonomics | How to find and tell your story | Scoop.it

Marketers have always used stories to share information, change opinions and influence decisions. Now, as people create, consume and share brand stories in new ways, marketers need to go beyond the 30-sec product ad or the 300-word press release, and tell purpose-inspired transmedia stories that inspire, organize and energize people.

 

The Storytelling Mandala is designed to help brands tell stories that inspire, organize and energize people to participate and act around a shared purpose. The inner circle consists of a new three-part universal story that articulates the purpose of the brand, the change it wants to catalyze and the quest it has undertaken. The outer circle focuses on the art of transmedia storytelling, including the role of content, the sources of content, the role of channels and the role of paid, owned and earned media.

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The Starter Guide to Non-profit Video Storytelling | Start Storytelling

The Starter Guide to Non-profit Video Storytelling | Start Storytelling | How to find and tell your story | Scoop.it

Free eBook

 

This is a guide to help you create videos the right way. We'll show you how to:

- Think strategically about video
-Figure out what kind of video you need
- Find the best plot and story to tell

- Structure a story
- Use video for campaigns and fundraising
- Understanding the basics of the production process

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TSDigs: The Collected Digital Storytelling Resources | TechSoup

The TechSoup Digital Storytelling Challenge asked social benefit organizations for their best photos and videos and in return shared a month’s worth of educational events. February 2012 was marked by weekly tweet chats and webinars, an episode of NPLive, blog posts, and articles on the topic of digital storytelling.  Recaps of all the webinars and tweet chats as well as articles are available here.

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An Exceedingly Simple Guide to Keeping a Journal | zenhabits

I have bits of journals in several notebooks and in several computer files, but while they’re interesting, they’re more a testament to my failure to keep a journal going for very long.  But this year has been different.

 

What has changed? I instituted a few “tricks” to keep the journaling simple, easy, and sustainable.  Here's my 3 journal rules.

- only write a few bullet points

- keep my notebook where I won't miss it

- don't miss more than 2 days of journaling

- read more for bonus tips...

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The Secrets of Storytelling | Homeschool

The Secrets of Storytelling | Homeschool | How to find and tell your story | Scoop.it

Teach your students how to tell stories in 5 steps.  Work your student through this sequence at whatever pace feels comfortable to both of you.

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How to Make Your Customers the Hero of Your Story | Duct Tape Marketing

How to Make Your Customers the Hero of Your Story | Duct Tape Marketing | How to find and tell your story | Scoop.it

I use the idea of hero a fair amount when I talk about what we do. I don’t use it in an egotistic way, more aspirational really than anything. I think aspiring to be a hero to someone is a good thing.

 

While I think it’s important that you and your business strive to be the hero in somebody’s story, I think it’s equally important that you understand how to position your customer or community as the hero of your story. Below are some of my thoughts on how you do this:

- learn their backstory

- give them an antagonist

- call them to duty

- help them persevere

- free them

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The Art and Importance of Storytelling | Bling Bling, Hello?

The Art and Importance of Storytelling | Bling Bling, Hello? | How to find and tell your story | Scoop.it

Story telling is an art form and often a talent though, and doesn’t come naturally to everyone. I’m sure each one of you reading this article will know at least one really great story teller in your social circle or family. Most people are able to relay facts and information but magically turning this into a story, requires a completely different set of skills.

 

Whilst we’re not all able and captivating story tellers, I’ve put together some guidelines and pointers that I’ve observed whilst listening to really great story tellers.

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Free Guide: Using Images for Visual Storytelling | CauseVox

Free Guide: Using Images for Visual Storytelling | CauseVox | How to find and tell your story | Scoop.it

One of the most effective ways to tell stories is through images. Images evoke emotion — the root of what drives your nonprofit or cause. We found this free guidebook developed by the Center for Social Impact Communication at Georgetown on how you can use images to create an impact. It walks you through the types of images you should be using and how you can systematically capture them.

 

Oooo, ooooo, ooooo -- I love free guides! And here's one on how you can use images to create visual stories, or to trigger a story within the reader's imagination.

 

Happy Friday and enjoy grabbing your free guide! I hope it helps you add fabulous visuals into your stories, or create compelling visual storytelling.


Via Karen Dietz
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Karen Dietz's comment, April 1, 2012 12:13 PM
Thanks Gimli!
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The 5 zones of attention in storytelling | Limor Shiponi

The 5 zones of attention in storytelling | Limor Shiponi | How to find and tell your story | Scoop.it

Storytelling involves a complicated set of attention zones. None of them are more or less important than others and they’re all crucial. Translating these levels of attention to the business arena you’ll realize you’re looking at an important balancing act too many businesses seem to ignore.

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FREE! 365 Journal Topics

FREE! 365 Journal Topics | How to find and tell your story | Scoop.it

There's an easier way to get this great downlaod, but Scoop.it doesn't work with PDFs. Try the link below: http://www.passporttopurpose.com/downloads/365Journal.pdf


Via Kathy Hansen
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Two more bits on storytelling | Ad Aged

Two more bits on storytelling | Ad Aged | How to find and tell your story | Scoop.it

Storytelling rules from filmmakers Billy Wilder and Preston Sturges.

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Storytelling: Turning the Page for Organizational Change | B2E Comm

Storytelling: Turning the Page for Organizational Change | B2E Comm | How to find and tell your story | Scoop.it

A great story is dynamic. It engages the audience, illuminates a need or opportunity and inspires an action or response.It’s no wonder then that more and more companies are using storytelling to help drive behavior, mindset and culture change within their own organizations. When done well, storytelling can show employees at all levels of an organization exactly how you need them to think, act and behave.

 

Getting Started

When it comes to driving organizational change, it is important to remember that storytelling is a process. Stories need to be repeated. They need to be reinforced. You cannot expect a change overnight.  Here are a few tips to help you incorporate a storytelling program within your organization:

- know your organization

- stay focused

- identify, capture, and manage story leads

- take a multi-channel approach

- make it credible - and two-way

- get leadership onboard

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10 Best Practices for Using Storytelling in Training | Langevin

10 Best Practices for Using Storytelling in Training | Langevin | How to find and tell your story | Scoop.it

My sister is a professional storyteller. Mary can get into character and affect age, voice, and mannerisms to invite the audience into the world she is creating. She also uses storytelling as a tool to train on leadership and teambuilding – with great results.

 

The use of stories in the learning environment can be one of the most powerful instructional techniques in your arsenal. Yet, in order to have the greatest impact, you need to know your purpose in telling a story and keep some purpose-related guidelines in mind.

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5 Warning Signs that you are telling, not showing in your writing | Melinda McGuire Writes

5 Warning Signs that you are telling, not showing in your writing | Melinda McGuire Writes | How to find and tell your story | Scoop.it

5 ways you may be telling your readers, instead of showing

1. Are you writing in passive voice?

2. Check your descriptions

3. Incorporate sensory details - connected to #2

4. Use dialogue

5. Be specific

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Lightning Bug

Lightning Bug | How to find and tell your story | Scoop.it

Lightning Bug is THE writing companion for young authors. Helping you to write a story from beginning to THE END.


Via Ana Cristina Pratas, Aki Puustinen
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Little Scraps of Paper

Little Scraps of Paper | How to find and tell your story | Scoop.it

Little Scraps of Paper is a series of short documentary films about how creative people develop ideas and thoughts and what they keep them in.


Via Gregg Morris
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Writing and Healing: Five Stellar Strategies for Writing Through Tough Times | Women's Memoirs

Writing and Healing: Five Stellar Strategies for Writing Through Tough Times | Women's Memoirs | How to find and tell your story | Scoop.it
Regular guest blogger, children’s book author and coach. Pamela is currently writing her memoir

It can be hard enough writing when everything in your life is going smoothly, but what about when you hit a rough patch? In truth, completing a memoir (or any work of art) is a triumph. If things took their natural course, nothing would ever be completed – the odds are against it. The writer has to assert her will over illness, inertia, accidents, backed-up drains, financial worries, and telemarketers.

By observing myself and interviewing other writers, I’ve come up with five strategies for helping you write through tough times. I hope you’ll find them helpful and that you’ll enhance our list by sharing some tips of your own!

Via Kathy Hansen
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The Long Retcon: Leave the Storytelling to the Writers | Gaming Irresponsibly

The Long Retcon: Leave the Storytelling to the Writers | Gaming Irresponsibly | How to find and tell your story | Scoop.it

[I'm not sure I totally agree with the authors take on this. The storyteller gets to tell their story their way but they should be telling it to suit their audience.  At the same time everyone has the right to take what they want/need out of a story and make it their own - even if it means changing the ending on the retelling. KZ]

 

Earlier this month, many fans of the beloved Mass Effect series began throwing their arms in the air demanding that BioWare change the outcome of Mass Effect 3. I was intrigued by this response. I kept asking myself, “Should video game developers or storytellers in general, change the ending of their story to adhere to the fan base?” The more I thought about this, the more I realized my answer would always be, “No.”

 

This is not because I love every ending to every story, nor is it because I am on the side of any storyteller. The story will always be what it is, as told by the creator. No matter the ending, fans should never allow their own personal preferences compromise the integrity of the story. By attempting to have someone change the story, you have effectively diminished the story, and the message, that the creators had hoped to convey. Good or bad, love it or hate it, take it for what it is, the end of the story.

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11 Laws of Great Storytelling | The Story Department

11 Laws of Great Storytelling | The Story Department | How to find and tell your story | Scoop.it

Jeffrey Hirschberg found out there are 11 Laws of Great Storytelling – trends that exist in many of the most memorable stories of all time. “While it is impossible to have a foolproof formula, I have learned certain principles dramatically increase the probability of your story achieving a modicum of greatness.”

 

Throughout my years of screenwriting I have read and analyzed thousands of scripts from writers of all levels. Here is what I discovered during this time:

1. Assume everyone has A.D.D.

2. Spend most of your time on the first ten pages of your script

3. Write roles to attract movie stars

4. Write economically

5. Make sure every character has a unique voice

6. Understand your audience

7. Know your three-act structure

8. Be aware of theme, and keep it consistent throughout the script

9. Watch and re-watch successful movies similar to your story

10. Know what your hero wants (the goal), what happens if he doesn’t get what he wants (the stakes), and who/what is preventing him from getting what he wants (the villain)

11. Leave them wanting more

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