How to find and t...
Follow
Find
11.7K views | +0 today
 
Scooped by Kim Zinke (aka Gimli Goose)
onto How to find and tell your story
Scoop.it!

Good Companies Are Storytellers. Great Companies Are Storydoers | Harvard Business Review

Good Companies Are Storytellers. Great Companies Are Storydoers | Harvard Business Review | How to find and tell your story | Scoop.it

"In my new book, True Story: How to Combine Story and Action to Transform Your Business [Ty Montague], I call these new companies storydoing companies because they advance their narrative through action, not communication. Storydoing companies — Red Bull, TOMS shoes, Warby Parker, and Tory Burch, for example — emphasize the creation of compelling and useful experiences — new products, new services, and new tools that advance their narrative by lighting up the medium of people. What I mean by this is that when people encounter a storydoing company they often want to tell all their friends about it. Storydoing companies create fierce loyalty and evangelism in their customers. Their stories are told primarily via word of mouth, and are amplified by social media tools.

 

So how do you know a storydoing company when you see one? These are the primary characteristics:

- They have a story

- The story is about a larger ambition to make the world or people's lives better

- The story is understood and cared about by senior leadership outside of marketing

- That story is being used to drive tangible action throughout the company: product development, HR policies, compensation, etc.

- These actions add back up to a cohesive whole

- Customers and partners are motivated to engage with the story and are actively using it to advance their own stories"

 

Read the full article to see research results on the difference between storytelling and storydoing companies.

Kim Zinke (aka Gimli Goose)'s insight:

To view the image above (the tool to help you identify if you are a storydoing company) and for more information on storydoing visit http://storydoing.com.

more...
Juliet Chen's curator insight, July 18, 2013 7:42 AM

Actions speak louder than words - even if you tell a brilliant story.

Chris Aarons's curator insight, July 28, 2013 9:53 PM

The is where social and content come together to become greater than the sum of their parts.

Sonja Blignaut's curator insight, August 6, 2013 5:14 AM

It really is all in the doing ...

How to find and tell your story
Discovering the art of storytelling by showcasing methods, tips, & tools that help you find and tell your story, your way. Find me on Twitter @gimligoosetales
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Kim Zinke (aka Gimli Goose)
Scoop.it!

Storytelling 101: How One Story Built a Global Brand | Resonance Content

Storytelling 101: How One Story Built a Global Brand | Resonance Content | How to find and tell your story | Scoop.it

"If you still think that storytelling is just a “nice to have,” a luxury for blue-chip corporations who have resources to spare, you need to meet Rob Morris a long-time human rights advocate."


Read the full article to find out how one story turned a nonprofit into a worldwide phenomenon by using these story tips:

  • Statistics can make an impression, but stories raise emotion … and emotion leads to action.
  • Keep your story simple; resist the urge to provide every little detail.
  • Make it easy for your brand advocates to share your story.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Kim Zinke (aka Gimli Goose)
Scoop.it!

How to spot business storytelling training that delivers | Anecdote

How to spot business storytelling training that delivers | Anecdote | How to find and tell your story | Scoop.it

"If you’re looking for business storytelling training that delivers for your leaders, how do you decide which training to choose? What makes a good program? While this advice I’m about to share is not free from self-interest, we offer a business storytelling program, I’m going to do my best to describe what I think a good program should have."


Read the full article to find out more about what to look for in a storytelling training program:

  • Learn from storytellers
  • Learn business storytelling from business people
  • Focus on forming a storytelling habit
  • Engage in deliberate practice
  • Include coaching
  • Engage all the learning styles
  • High quality learning materials
  • Demonstrable outcomes
more...
Art Jones's curator insight, November 13, 4:33 PM

Joseph Campbell & Gustav Freytag were both masters of understanding and using story to engage and captivate. Those two gentlemen so well documented the process of story formulation that our ability to find that info and use it to tell a great story isnt that hard to do. 


However there are two points within this article that I believe are key to using story effectively and they are:


(1) Make story practice a deliberate part of your process.

(2) Understand the analytics of the stories you share, build into your organization the ability to measure when story has helped move the business needle.


To say it a different way:


(1) Perfect practice makes for perfect performance

(2) if you can't measure it you can't improve it. 

Scooped by Kim Zinke (aka Gimli Goose)
Scoop.it!

The Power of Marketing with Stories: Learning The Art of Story "Selling" | Jolynn Oblak

The Power of Marketing with Stories: Learning The Art of Story "Selling" | Jolynn Oblak | How to find and tell your story | Scoop.it

"In this marketing with stories series, you’re going to learn to distinguish what type of stories your audience wants to read and how to use visuals to make your stories more appealing and understandable. Finally, you’re going to learn how to make your stories so compelling that you’ll get more shares, more sign ups, and more responses than ever before."


Read the full article to learn more about these tips:

  • Build your story
  • 7 Steps to Writing a Credible Story That People Will Share
  • Common Mistakes Made in Writing Your Story
  • Putting a Twist on Traditional Stories
  • How to Tell Stories Your Audience Wants to Read
  • How to Use Visuals in Your Marketing Stories
  • Ways to Re-purpose Content & Get More Out of Each Story
  • The Most Important Factors in Marketing with Stories
  • Storytelling Resources (books)
Kim Zinke (aka Gimli Goose)'s insight:

Each of the tips is a stand-alone article, so a very meaty series.  The stories you write will be about your audience and will address their concerns, their needs, their pain points, and how your product or service will fix those issues.

more...
Marco Favero's curator insight, November 4, 10:38 AM

aggiungi la tua intuizione ...

Scooped by Kim Zinke (aka Gimli Goose)
Scoop.it!

12 Ways to Improve Your Digital Storytelling | Vocus

12 Ways to Improve Your Digital Storytelling | Vocus | How to find and tell your story | Scoop.it

"I wanted to understand the mechanics of storytelling and how people are able to leverage this tool to communicate ideas more effectively than I am predisposed to communicate."


Read the full article to find out more about these 12 best practices that you can use to improve your digital storytelling:

  1. Your story must have conflict
  2. Your story must have form
  3. Your story must align with audience values
  4. Your story must be sensual
  5. Your story must be (heavily) edited
  6. Your story must be plausible
  7. Your storytelling must have anecdotes
  8. Your story must challenge your audience
  9. Your story must have economy
  10. Your story has a lexicon
  11. Your story must leverage technology
  12. You must know this: your story is capricious
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Kim Zinke (aka Gimli Goose)
Scoop.it!

7 Tips for Better Modern Day Storytelling | Write a Writing

7 Tips for Better Modern Day Storytelling | Write a Writing | How to find and tell your story | Scoop.it

"Even if you are aiming at a position as a public speaker, you will be needing the art of storytelling to help you out. To express a story, be it real or a fiction, yours or someone else’s, one can adapt several ways. Storytelling is basically a band that is shared between the listeners and the person who’s telling the story, and one of the best, yet trickiest part of storytelling is that every storytelling experience is a new one so there’s plenty to keep a note about.


In spite of the dynamic nature of storytelling, there are some tips that you can keep in mind that will help you in better storytelling regardless of how different the story is every time you narrate it."


Read the full article to find out more about these seven tips:

  1. Choose The Story You Prefer
  2. Don’t Rush The Story
  3. Use The Microphone
  4. Don’t Be Afraid To Trim The Story
  5. Be Confident
  6. Maintain Eye Contact
  7. Let The Listeners Get to The Moral
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Kim Zinke (aka Gimli Goose)
Scoop.it!

Growth Through Expert Storytelling | Inc

Growth Through Expert Storytelling | Inc | How to find and tell your story | Scoop.it

"Have you crafted your story so well that others are likely to share it over cocktails at a dinner party? If you're like most entrepreneurs, you probably haven't. Most founders take the time to think about their company's mission and purpose, and that's hard enough. But having a mission and a purpose is not the same thing as expert storytelling.


Write a story you could tell to anyone, anywhere. Make it so simple that anyone from a child in kindergarten to the Chairman of the Board can understand."


Read the full article to find out more about these tips on how to break storytelling down into a 5-step process:

  1. Who are you talking about?
  2. Define the problem or opportunity in simple terms
  3. What is it that [your company] can do to help solve that problem?
  4. What does solving this problem do? Or what does our client think solving this problem will do for them?
  5. What's the customer's customer story?
Kim Zinke (aka Gimli Goose)'s insight:

I love that the focus of this process is about telling a simple and easy to remember/repeat story.  The article includes examples of 5 organizations with a great simple story.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Kim Zinke (aka Gimli Goose)
Scoop.it!

Want to Be More Memorable? Create Your Own Personal Connection Story | Huffington Post

Want to Be More Memorable? Create Your Own Personal Connection Story | Huffington Post | How to find and tell your story | Scoop.it

"Stories are a great tool for making yourself memorable when you meet someone new. The problem with meeting someone new is the process is so routine -- we've all done it so frequently -- that it is very easy to fall in a rut.


Almost every time you meet someone new, it is very easy to get in a habit of explaining who you are and what you do in the same way, over and over again, without thinking."


Read the full article to find out this 4-step process for creating your own personal connection story which will enable you to be much more memorable when you meet new people:

  1. Create Story Markers
  2. Create a Progression of Actions, or Story Arc
  3. Identify the People in your Story
  4. Explain the Point of the Story
Kim Zinke (aka Gimli Goose)'s insight:

A good connection story is short - preferably less than 90 seconds long - and illustrates who you are as a person. It also explains what you do and perhaps even why you do it in a way that is distinctive and memorable.  If you think you don't have a great connection story, which you do, the article ends with ideas of how to help you find it.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Kim Zinke (aka Gimli Goose)
Scoop.it!

Cartman’s storytelling secret that every CMO should steal | Park Howell

Cartman’s storytelling secret that every CMO should steal | Park Howell | How to find and tell your story | Scoop.it

"Randy Olson uncovered the And, But, and Therefore method from the most unlikely place. South Park. He was watching a documentary, “6 Days to Air,” about the manic schedule Trey Parker follows to create each episode of the crass but brilliant cartoon, when the secret was unveiled. When a script isn’t working for Parker, he goes back and replaces “ands” with “buts,” which creates conflict and tension in the story: the secret sauce to entertaining an audience. The tension then requires resolution, or the “therefore”: the conclusion of every story. It’s a simple and perfect three-act storytelling structure. Foolproof. Even for Cartman."


Read the full article to find out more and see a video about the And, But and Therefore method.

Kim Zinke (aka Gimli Goose)'s insight:

Watch the video to see how to put this method into action.  It really is simple and effective.  I like the idea from the last paragraph of the article that recommends doing this as a quick exercise before starting any story.

more...
Scooped by Kim Zinke (aka Gimli Goose)
Scoop.it!

The Art of Story Telling: 5 Tips to Telling a Great Story | ChicagoNow

The Art of Story Telling: 5 Tips to Telling a Great Story | ChicagoNow | How to find and tell your story | Scoop.it

"I'm sure you've been at an interview or a dinner party or a fundraiser and someone asks..."tell me about yourself". Most of us define ourselves by the list of things we have done, the places we've been, the schools we've attended. But that's not who we are. We are a collection of stories, not fables, but defining moments in our journey."


Read the full article to find out more on how to find your personal story using these 5 tips:

  1. Build the character
  2. Define the problem
  3. Outline the struggle
  4. What are the lessons
  5. Shine the light
Kim Zinke (aka Gimli Goose)'s insight:

If you put all these tips into one telling, it could become quite the lengthy tale.  Be aware and respectful of your audience.  How much time do they have to listen?  Can you make the story succinct?  Practice it often so you won't miss a beat the next time someone asks you for our story.

more...
Art Jones's curator insight, October 12, 10:00 AM

I love the elegance of this story formula

Scooped by Kim Zinke (aka Gimli Goose)
Scoop.it!

The Story Cycle: A simple 10-step storytelling process to create abundance in your business | ParkHowell

The Story Cycle: A simple 10-step storytelling process to create abundance in your business | ParkHowell | How to find and tell your story | Scoop.it

"Businesses of all sizes are having success with the Story Cycle. We distilled this 10-step process from the timeless narrative structure of the ancients based on American mythologist Joseph Campbell’s “Hero’s Journey.”


But the story is NOT about you or your brand. It is about your customer. Your brand is the mentor in the story, the Obi Wan Kenobi to your customer’s Luke Skywalker, the true hero of the journey. The more you and your brand understand and empathize with your customers’ stories, and how you can mentor them in their quest for a better life, the more abundant growth you will experience in all aspects of your business, and in YOUR life."


Read the full article to find out more about how to work with these 10 steps to create your story:

  1. Backstory
  2. Hero
  3. Stakes
  4. Disruption
  5. Antagonists
  6. Mentor
  7. Journey
  8. Victory
  9. Moral
  10. Ritual
Kim Zinke (aka Gimli Goose)'s insight:

As you explore the 10 steps, picture how the process is already playing out in your business, in the lives of your employees, with your customers, and in your own journey.  Then begin to collect your stories from those observations.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Kim Zinke (aka Gimli Goose)
Scoop.it!

3 Simple Ways to Start Your Story | Get Storied

3 Simple Ways to Start Your Story | Get Storied | How to find and tell your story | Scoop.it

"Let’s be honest – one of the hardest things to decide is where to start your story. If you don’t know where to begin, you don’t really know where to take things either. It’s easy to feel like you’re chasing your tail.


Storytelling can be complex and the information about storytelling, well, overwhelming. The good news, is that you can start either way — from the future (with a vision story) or the past (with an origin story). In this article I want to show you simple ways that you can dive right into telling your story."


Read the full article to find out more about these 3 phrases you can use to start your story:

  1. Imagine if...
  2. Here's what excites me...
  3. I remember when...
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Kim Zinke (aka Gimli Goose) from Digital Storytelling
Scoop.it!

5 Mistakes in Storytelling: Part 1 | Rexi Media

View the SlideShare to find out more about these 5 typical mistakes people make when sharing stories in business settings, and how to rectify them, when some presenters:

  1. Announce:  "Let me start with a story"
  2. Think they are sharing stories, when in reality, they are sharing facts
  3. Get the hero wrong
  4. Don't relate stories to people's experiences
  5. Mention a story only once


Don't stop there.  View part 2, 4 More Mistakes in Storytelling, where some presenters:

  1. Choose the wrong kinds of stories
  2. Use stories unnecessarily
  3. Include too many abstract words
  4. Speak in generics

Via José Carlos
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Kim Zinke (aka Gimli Goose)
Scoop.it!

What does your brand stand for? | Visual.ly

What does your brand stand for? | Visual.ly | How to find and tell your story | Scoop.it

"Your brand is the lead character of its own story.  And like any story character, it has values and beliefs.  Knowing how to characterize your brand is another way of defining what your brand stands for."


View a larger version of this infographic to find out more about these 12 character types which most brands fall into one or a blend of:

  • Purist
  • Pioneer
  • Source
  • Conqueror
  • Rebel
  • Wizard
  • Straight Shooter
  • Seducer
  • Entertainer
  • Protector
  • Imagineer
  • Emperor
Kim Zinke (aka Gimli Goose)'s insight:

Have a look at these different business branding characterizations and see if one of them fits you or your brand. I like how each provides a list of people and brands that fit the characterization to provide even more clarity.  The detail provides some story prompts and can help you identify and layout what kind of story you want to tell.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Kim Zinke (aka Gimli Goose)
Scoop.it!

Digital Storytelling | iHistory with Mr. JZ

Digital Storytelling | iHistory with Mr. JZ | How to find and tell your story | Scoop.it

"Here is an example of what you can do with Puppet Pals in a history classroom. This is a digital story I made to show the students what can be done with the app."


Read the full article to access brief tutorials and examples of digital stories made with the apps:

  • Puppet Pals
  • Tellagami
Kim Zinke (aka Gimli Goose)'s insight:

What a great way to jazz up a history class!  I'll be the students find this a lot more interesting than simply reading from a text.  Educators should also take a look at his suggested apps & reviews (including one on Puppet Pals).


Don't dismiss this article or stop reading because you think these apps are only for educators or children.  I can see many types of stories being told using them.  For example, how fun would it be to upload images of family events or your ancestors and then add yourself as the main character who walks and narrates you through their story.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Kim Zinke (aka Gimli Goose)
Scoop.it!

The Amazingly Simple Anatomy of a Meaningful Marketing Story [Infographic] | Copyblogger

The Amazingly Simple Anatomy of a Meaningful Marketing Story [Infographic] | Copyblogger | How to find and tell your story | Scoop.it

"Apple. Dos Equis. Old Spice. Procter & Gamble. Ram Trucks. Jack Link’s Beef Jerky. GEICO. GoDaddy.  At some point, all these companies told compelling stories that grabbed our attention — and held it. Not just for thirty seconds, but longer."


Read the full article to see the infographic and find out more about these storytelling elements you need:

  1. hero
  2. goal
  3. conflict
  4. mentor
  5. moral
Kim Zinke (aka Gimli Goose)'s insight:

Be sure to check out the links to related articles at the bottom of the post.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Kim Zinke (aka Gimli Goose)
Scoop.it!

7 Storytelling Tips for Scrapbookers | Creative Live

7 Storytelling Tips for Scrapbookers | Creative Live | How to find and tell your story | Scoop.it

"At its core, scrapbooking is a form of storytelling. Underneath the pretty paper and stickers, scrapbookers use their photos combined with words to document their lives in a meaningful way. For many crafters, however, the words are sometimes hard to get down on the page. Many of us (yes, I’m including myself in this category!) dread the thought of penning long paragraphs of prose. So how can reluctant journalers still create pages that tell stories in meaningful ways?"


Read the full article to find out more about these seven ideas that can help you get the words flowing:

  1. Use prompts
  2. Try a quote
  3. Make a list
  4. Create a timeline
  5. Use humor
  6. Record a conversation
  7. Hand over the journalling pen
Kim Zinke (aka Gimli Goose)'s insight:

Great tips for anyone searching for their story.  Storytelling tips are the same regardless of the medium.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Kim Zinke (aka Gimli Goose)
Scoop.it!

Business Storytelling | Cynthia Hartwig

"In this presentation, you’ll see how stories can be used in all kinds of business settings to communicate and connect with employees, customers, colleagues, partners, suppliers, and the media.


You’ll learn the mechanics of telling a story with a beginning that hooks you, to a middle that builds tension, to a satisfying end.


You’ll learn how to weave rich information (even numbers) with personal insights and emotional power and then experience the thrill of having an audience remember what you’ve said. Many writing exercises are included to help you tap into the mind’s unique hard-wiring that can create a story out of almost any experience."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Kim Zinke (aka Gimli Goose)
Scoop.it!

5 Ways for Nonprofits to Tell an Ethical Story | The Nonprofit Quarterly

5 Ways for Nonprofits to Tell an Ethical Story | The Nonprofit Quarterly | How to find and tell your story | Scoop.it

"In an effort to raise money and awareness for causes, nonprofit organizations often feel compelled to tell stories of desperate victims. 


Reducing someone to a problem when he offered to share his story—an extraordinary act of charitable giving all its own—is a victimizing act, and it imposes a viewpoint of his situation he may not share. On a broader scale, it can reinforce false stereotypes most nonprofits try to combat about who lives in poverty, who has a mental health condition, and who faces obstacles bigger than they alone can overcome (which is all of us).


I have certainly made these storytelling mistakes. In an effort to convey the urgent need to fix substandard housing, I have told stories that focused on the severity of the housing conditions themselves, neglecting the fact that these stories are firstly about the person experiencing the poor housing, and secondarily about the societal structures contributing to the problem. In my experience, people who work at nonprofits are conscious of the tension between promoting their work and protecting their clients. But the tension is often wrongly associated with the act of storytelling itself—the notion that sharing someone’s story or name is itself victimizing. Storytelling is inherently value neutral, and it can be victimizing or empowering depending on what the narrative says and how it is used."


Read the full article to find out more about these five ways we can all be more empowering storytellers:

  1. Avoid “case example syndrome”
  2. Ask someone how he wants his story shared
  3. Represent your organization as a partner in a person or community’s success, not a savior
  4. Ensure others can see themselves in the story
  5. Challenge myths about the issue you address
Kim Zinke (aka Gimli Goose)'s insight:

Anyone telling someone else's story, or even there own, can learn from these tips.  What are you trying to achieve when you tell the story?  Is it a long term or short term gain?  Will a victim story get the result you want or will an empowering story be better?

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Kim Zinke (aka Gimli Goose)
Scoop.it!

Storytelling Workshop: Techinques, Models, Tools & Resources | Darin Eich

Storytelling Workshop: Techinques, Models, Tools & Resources | Darin Eich | How to find and tell your story | Scoop.it

"This is a list of story models, techniques, tools, & resources from our storytelling workshop. There are different models that can help you to piece your story together."


Read the full article to find out more about these models:

  • Lead with Story CAR Model
  • Made to Stick SUCCES Model
  • Joseph Campbell’s Hero’s Journey Model
  • Ira Glass on Storytelling
  • Pixar’s 22 Rules to Phenomenal Storytelling
  • Story Workshop Development Activities
Kim Zinke (aka Gimli Goose)'s insight:

A nice collection of models and techniques to tell short and long stories.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Kim Zinke (aka Gimli Goose)
Scoop.it!

October 2014 Monthly Tip: Get Out of Your Storytelling Box | Good Works Co.

October 2014 Monthly Tip: Get Out of Your Storytelling Box | Good Works Co. | How to find and tell your story | Scoop.it

"By far the most common question I’m asked when I’m speaking about storytelling is, “How do we tell our stories if we have to maintain our client’s privacy?”"


Read the full article to find out more about these two ways you can address issues of privacy and confidentiality:

  1. Change enough details of the story that the subject becomes unidentifiable.  What’s important is to include these five critical elements:  a protagonist, problem, antagonist, awareness, and transformation.
  2. Tell your organization’s story from a different angle.  Try one of these instead:  donor, staff person, volunteer, inanimate object, animal, or body part.
Kim Zinke (aka Gimli Goose)'s insight:

Be sure to check out the video examples to see how these types of stories have been done.

more...
Rescooped by Kim Zinke (aka Gimli Goose) from Digital Storytelling Tools, Apps and Ideas
Scoop.it!

How to Improve Your Photography with Storytelling Images | Digital Photography School

How to Improve Your Photography with Storytelling Images | Digital Photography School | How to find and tell your story | Scoop.it

"How many times have you had this interaction?

     “This photo is beautiful!”

     “Thanks!”

End of conversation.


There’s nothing wrong with this, of course. Beautiful is a great, great compliment. However, if you’ve ever wanted to have a longer conversation with a viewer about one of your photographs, then creating images with stories behind them, or around your own personal stories, can be a very important approach to try."


Read the full article to find out more about how to make use of the following types of photographs to create your story:

  • ambiguous
  • personal
  • documentary

Via Cindy Rudy
Kim Zinke (aka Gimli Goose)'s insight:

Good examples of how to further develop your story and engage your audience by using well thought out images.


A favourite exercise of mine is to share an image and ask others what story they see in it.  No two interpretations are ever the same.

more...
FVallet's curator insight, October 15, 3:14 AM

Utiliser des visuels, des photos en com interne est indispensable à l'heure de l'egocasting. Pour autant toutes les photos ne sont pas automatiquement "raconteuses d'histoires".  Cet article ne  concerne pas le domaine du corporate mais ouvre un sujet de réflexion interessant.

 

Scooped by Kim Zinke (aka Gimli Goose)
Scoop.it!

The One Storytelling Tactic You Need to Succeed | American Express

The One Storytelling Tactic You Need to Succeed | American Express | How to find and tell your story | Scoop.it

"What if there were a proven (and simple) way to craft a story you need to tell that would keep your audience listening until you were through? Well, the good news is, there is—it’s called bookending."


Read the full article to learn how to bookend and, by doing so, the art of keeping your audience on edge with every step of your story, written or spoken:

  • Discover the one Big Universal Question (BUQ) that your story will answer
  • Deliver an answer to the BUQ
  • Repeat your BUQ
Kim Zinke (aka Gimli Goose)'s insight:

By bookending your story—starting with a question, ending with the same question and offering solutions in between that answer said question—your audience has a through line to follow.  That through line will keep your audience on edge waiting to hear your solutions.


Watch the TEDx video linked to at the bottom of the article to see this technique in practice.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Kim Zinke (aka Gimli Goose)
Scoop.it!

Who cares? And how to make them | Flint People

Who cares? And how to make them | Flint People | How to find and tell your story | Scoop.it

So… how do you make people CARE about your mission?  Suzanne Skees does just this. She works with nonprofits to tell stories that make people care about their mission. Her stories are focused on real people. Not just an organization’s cause and work, but its people."


Read the full article to find out more about Suzanne’s 7 steps on how to tell effective stories about REAL people & how to make people “get” what it is you do.:

  1. Set a goal & create a list of stories
  2. Tell the WHOLE story – the good, the bad & the ugly
  3. If you’re visiting a place, study where you’re going
  4. There’s no such thing as a general audience
  5. Bring ‘em along, without them having to buy a plane ticket
  6. Establish Rapport (and a funny story!)
  7. The Secret Sauce
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Kim Zinke (aka Gimli Goose)
Scoop.it!

What Objects Tell the Story of Your Life? | New York Times

What Objects Tell the Story of Your Life? | New York Times | How to find and tell your story | Scoop.it

"Carefully curating a limited set of objects has lately become a popular way for museums and historians to tell vast histories (e.g., the history of the world, or of New York City).


We can use the same approach to tell our personal histories as well. A sentimental T-shirt, a kindergarten drawing or a dog-eared book? What objects tell the story of your life?"


Read the related article Object Lessons in History then answer:

  • What objects tell the story of your life? Can you identify five or 10 objects that you would include in an exhibit or book about your life?

  • Why did you select each of those objects?

  • Do you think telling history through objects is a “a clever way to hook people on history”? Do objects tell a story that words or images aren’t able to convey quite as effectively?

Kim Zinke (aka Gimli Goose)'s insight:

This is an exercise for students 13+.  But I think it's great for any age. Use it as a storytelling prompt.  Or try it as a team exercise by replacing "your life" with "our organization"  in the above prompts. Did everyone pick the same list of objects or were they wildly diverse? You could tell stories about each of the objects or you tell the story about why each person picked the objects they did.  Use them internally or externally.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Kim Zinke (aka Gimli Goose)
Scoop.it!

How to spot a story - a simple story framework: Infographic | Anecdote

How to spot a story - a simple story framework: Infographic | Anecdote | How to find and tell your story | Scoop.it

"Business people lack a simple story framework to help them spot stories so they can tell the difference between a story and just a tag line, or an assertion, a viewpoint or just an out of context, unemotional, barely understandable dot point.


So here’s an infographic you can pin to your wall or save to your smart phone that gives you some simple guideposts to help you spot stories."


A business story has

  • a time or place marker
  • something is happening
  • people's names and/or dialogue
  • something unanticipated happens
  • a business point
Kim Zinke (aka Gimli Goose)'s insight:

A simple and easy to remember formula.

more...
No comment yet.