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Transmedia Storytelling Cookbook: from Digital to a Multiplatform Approach | Zemanta

Transmedia Storytelling Cookbook: from Digital to a Multiplatform Approach | Zemanta | How to find and tell your story | Scoop.it

Marketers are finally moving into a new era – transmedia storytelling. The previous era, characterized by a huge platform obsession approach, is over.

 

What is Transmedia?

Transmedia is a storytelling technique, which happens across multiple media platforms, but in a platform appropriate way.

Content is spread across several media simultaneously.

 

3 Main Phases of Development

1. Transmedia concept development: Emotional investment

2. Distribution Models: Social mechanics

3. Growth: Participation and Care

 

Transmedia Storytelling in Practice

1. Building Storyworlds, the art, craft & biz of storytelling in the 21st Century
2. Classical train: Enjoy the music

3. The Spiral

4. Antigones Dagbok, mobile drama

 

Read the full article to find fuller explanations and examples that present these different transmedia approaches and models.

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How to find and tell your story
Discovering the art of storytelling by showcasing methods, tips, & tools that help you find and tell your story, your way. Find me on Twitter @gimligoosetales
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Enchant Customers With the Story Behind Your Brand | Entrepreneur

Enchant Customers With the Story Behind Your Brand | Entrepreneur | How to find and tell your story | Scoop.it

"“Eat it and get out!” That’s the mantra for Ed Debevic’s, Chicago’s only retro themed diner. At Ed Debevic’s, guests step into a 50’s–style diner to experience the ambiance of a misty yore, complete with bobby sox, saddle shoes, and juke box. The surprise “twist” on this nostalgic experience is that the front-of-the-house employees are professional entertainers, trained to create a rollicking, in-your-face service experience.


Ed knows how to run an effective restaurant. Ed also knows how to run a “storied” restaurant. The tactic he has selected is the one used by many of the service greats, including Cirque du Soleil, DisneyWorld, Universal Studios Hollywood, Universal Orlando, Hard Rock Café, and many of the top hotels in Las Vegas. They all start with a front story or theme, use a back-story for depth, and include a storyboard to map out the customer experience. To this they add set, costume, and, if need be, script to convey the story."


Read the full story to find out more about using storying as a part of your service experience and the four main components on which you need to focus:

  1. Find or develop a strong front theme and back story.
  2. Develop and use a storyboard of the customer experience.
  3. Dress your “set” in sync with your story.
  4. Dress employees to fit the story.
Kim Zinke (aka Gimli Goose)'s insight:

People connect more easily with brands that make their story a central part of the customer experience.  So make it an entertaining story that they won't soon forget.

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20 Reasons Why You Should Write Your Family History: Association of Personal Historians Experts Weigh In | APH Blog

20 Reasons Why You Should Write Your Family History: Association of Personal Historians Experts Weigh In | APH Blog | How to find and tell your story | Scoop.it

"When a librarian by the name of Carmen Nigro published a post on the New York Public Library blog entitled 20 Reasons Why You Should Write Your Family History, personal historians and APH members around the world rejoiced. Ms. Nigro had tapped into the multitude of absolutely terrific reasons individuals, families and organisations should consider working with a personal historian to preserve their stories.


Tomorrow, we launch the first in a weekly, 20-part series inspired by the New York Public Library blog post. The following 20 members of the Association of Personal Historians will expand upon each of the 20 important motivations listed in Nigro’s article."


At the time of this post, the series was at #8.  Bookmark the site so you don't miss any future articles.  To find out what each of the 20 topics will be about, read the blog 20 Reasons Why You Should Write Your Family History that kick-started this series. But expect to find out about the how important your stories are to future generations, depict your ancestors how you see fit, therapeutic value, and much more.

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15 Insanely Actionable Storytelling Tips For Your Next Business Presentation | Nuts & Bolts

15 Insanely Actionable Storytelling Tips For Your Next Business Presentation | Nuts & Bolts | How to find and tell your story | Scoop.it

"Great corporate storytellers do two things very well: First (obviously), they tell stories. Second, through their stories, they get people to take action.


You might be thinking, “That’s great if you’re Steve Jobs, but how do I even begin turning my dry, everyday material into a story…let alone a gripping one?”


Well today I’m going to help you out with 15 insanely actionable storytelling tips and tricks to get you into the storytelling mindset, regardless of what type of material you’re working with."


Read the full article to find out more about these tips:

  1. Find Your Characters And Make Them The Focal Point Of Your Presentation
  2. Set The Stage By Describing Where You Are Now And Where You Want To Be In The Future
  3. Describe What Needs To Be Overcome And Highlight Why This Will Be Difficult
  4. Emotionally Invest Your Audience In The Struggle (Define Failure Or The Status Quo)
  5. Emotionally Invest Your Audience In The Outcome (Define What Success Looks like)
  6. Challenge Your Audience’s Assumptions By Adding A Twist
  7. Onboard Your Audience With An Interesting Metaphor THEY Can Relate To
  8. Show Your Audience Exactly What You Are Talking About
  9. Highlight The Important By Cutting Out The Unimportant
  10. Use Sound Effects To Anchor Important Details In Your Presentation
  11. Use Silence To Create Emphasis And Draw Your Audience Into Your Story
  12. Create A Warm Fuzzy Feeling By Sharing A Personal Or Vulnerable Experience
  13. Pace Out Your Story To Allow Your Audience To Breathe
  14. Turn Your Important Data Points Into Memory Glue
  15. End Your Story With A Bang And Then Shut Up
Kim Zinke (aka Gimli Goose)'s insight:

I like how each tip is laid out with steps, examples, and how it will improve your story. 


You can also download the article as a pdf (link is in article)

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Karen Dietz's curator insight, April 28, 6:19 PM

I like this piece! At first I was thinking, "Oh no, here's another headline designed to jerk my chain!" I think it's the word "insanely" that made me skeptical. But I check it out anyway, and am glad I did.


Why? Because it has some very refreshing things to say about structuring a storied presentation that will bring on the Wow! factor. And there are some great points about delivery, also.


There's a lot to gain from this post that contains material I usually don't see when authors write about storytelling and presentation.


Follow these tips here and I think you will win big next time you speak to a group.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

Jose Gonzalez's curator insight, April 29, 1:53 PM

Awesome!!

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Storytelling - Help Your Audience "See" Your Characters | Fripp

Storytelling - Help Your Audience "See" Your Characters | Fripp | How to find and tell your story | Scoop.it

"Michael Hauge is a brilliant Hollywood story consultant, author, screenwriting coach, and speaker.  His experience as a top Hollywood script consultant is evident in his masterful ability to bring out the emotional potential of any story.  Following his expert advice, both business speakers and professional speakers can learn how to tell their stories more effectively."


Read the full article to find out more about these tips from Hauge that will help improve the quality of the character descriptions in your stories:

  • Your job as a storyteller is to create IMAGES. This is true not just for screenwriters, but for anyone presenting a story to a reader or an audience.
  • The most common weakness of character descriptions I read or hear is that they generalize.
  • Your goal must be to reveal two or three clear, succinct and vivid details that create a picture in the minds of your reader or audience, and that convey something of the essence of that character.
Kim Zinke (aka Gimli Goose)'s insight:

Reveal just two or three carefully chosen details when introducing a character. That character will come alive for your readers and audiences, and they’ll be emotionally hooked into your story.  The article shows what three things to focus on and why.

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Storytelling with Data Visualization | Kurtosys

Storytelling with Data Visualization | Kurtosys | How to find and tell your story | Scoop.it

"I had the pleasure of attending a Guardian Masterclass in London — one specifically about Data Visualization for journalists, designers and marketers. Presented by both an editorial director and an art director, it covered both the story and the graphic design aspects, and the core theme of the course addressed a simple question – does your data tell a story and can you visualize it?"


Read the full article to find out more about infographics and:

  • history
  • matching stories to data
  • tips on visualizing data
  • putting data into context
  • what if there is no story in my data?

Via José Carlos
Kim Zinke (aka Gimli Goose)'s insight:

So it turns out infographics really aren't a that new, especially to the world of storytelling.  Some wonderful examples of historical and new uses.


The categorization and examples of infographics into these 5 areas was very helpful:

  1. illustrative
  2. proportional
  3. timeline
  4. map
  5. list
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John Caswell's curator insight, April 25, 5:20 AM

yep!

Marinhos's curator insight, April 26, 1:52 PM

Infográfico, recurso poderoso para a escola.

Anna Vetter's curator insight, May 1, 8:21 AM

L'infographie pour raconter des histoires.

Un article fort clairement documenté sur l'émergence des données visuelles. En prime, quelques conseils utiles pour la conception :

- organiser le plan de l'infographie sur le papier

- identifier l'idée force (comme sujet principal de l'infographie)

- vérifier l'exactitude des informations et la légitimité des sources

- faire aussi beau que possible !

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Importance of storytelling for your organization | HMA PR

Importance of storytelling for your organization | HMA PR | How to find and tell your story | Scoop.it
There are several key factors that help to make a story worth telling.


Read the full article to find out more about these key factors that help to make a story worth telling:

  • Authenticity
  • Access to something special
  • Secrets
  • Find a way to be unconventional
  • Aha
  • All good stories have a powerful ending
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It was a dark and stormy night... – 11 Examples of Storytelling in Marketing | ReferralCandy

It was a dark and stormy night... – 11 Examples of Storytelling in Marketing | ReferralCandy | How to find and tell your story | Scoop.it

"In Made to Stick, Gary Klein, a psychologist who studies high-pressure decision-making, suggests that stories are often retold because they contain wisdom.  In a medical context, stories provide a simulation of what to do in a certain situation.


But according to Made to Stick, stories contain something else: inspiration.


A story has the power to provide contextual simulation (knowledge about how to act) as well as inspiration (motivation to act).  Both aspects are “geared to generate action“.  The authors highlighted three story plots that inspire us to act:  challenge, connection, creative."


Read the full article to find out more about these 11 examples of storytelling in marketing that use the three plots:

  1. Warby Parker
  2. Dollar Shave Club
  3. Greats
  4. Toms
  5. Pura Vida Bracelets
  6. tentree
  7. Airbnb
  8. Asana
  9. Sugru
  10. Hampton Creek
  11. Moleskine
Kim Zinke (aka Gimli Goose)'s insight:

At the core of every great brand is a story.  Ask yourself: what is the motivation behind your brand? What problems did you set out to solve?  The story you tell shouldn’t be any story; it should be a story about your passion and motivation.  Focus on telling that story, and people will listen.

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The Other Side of Storytelling: Listening | Chronicle of Philanthropy

The Other Side of Storytelling: Listening | Chronicle of Philanthropy | How to find and tell your story | Scoop.it

StoryCorps founder and 2015 TED Prize winner of $1 million, Dave Isay, believes a genuine conversation can make a difference – and his group has created an app to facilitate those talks.


"When’s the last time someone listened to you? Really listened carefully? A time when the person listening wasn’t trying to get something out of you? How did it feel?


Maybe you felt understood. Appreciated. Noticed. Chances are, it felt pretty good.


It’s a special experience, especially for people who have been made to feel that they don’t matter. And it’s at the heart of StoryCorps, the nonprofit that provides people of all backgrounds and beliefs with the opportunity to record, share, and preserve the stories of our lives.


That mission got a boost last month when the organization launched the first version of its mobile app. The tool enables users to record an interview, take a picture to accompany it, and then tag and share the story. And like the rest of StoryCorps’s more than 50,000 recordings, stories uploaded using the mobile app during its first year will be archived at the American Folklife Center at the Library of Congress. They will also appear on the new storycorps.me website.


The app was announced when StoryCorps founder Dave Isay was awarded the 2015 TED Prize by the global ideas nonprofit, granting him $1 million and the support of the TED audience to carry out a wish. He asked for help so that “anyone, anywhere, can easily record a meaningful interview with another human being, which then will be archived for history.”


Read the full article to find out more about:

  • where to download the free mobile app
  • why the app is more than just the technicalities
  • link to watch Dave Isay’s TED Prize talk and how to follow the progress of his wish on the TED blog
Kim Zinke (aka Gimli Goose)'s insight:

The app looks clean and easy to use.  There's lots of information, and links to the app, on the https://storycorps.me/ site.


There are also lots more resources, like interview questions, and stories to listen to on StoryCorps main site.

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From Homer To J.K. Rowling: The World's Greatest Storytellers, Visualized | Fast Co.Design

From Homer To J.K. Rowling: The World's Greatest Storytellers, Visualized | Fast Co.Design | How to find and tell your story | Scoop.it

"Before it became an overused bit of business jargon, storytelling was the job of authors, poets, playwrights, and not brands. History’s greatest storytellers are visualized in this timeline infographic by culture site Raconteur.


If brands really want to captivate consumers, maybe they should consider including more ghosts, witches, and monsters in their marketing stories."


To view the full infographic, see this Raconteur article.

Kim Zinke (aka Gimli Goose)'s insight:

The diversity of this list is wonderful.  There's multiple ways to tell your story.  Be inspired by this list.  Develop your own style and tell a story that is captivating.

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The ROI of Storytelling | The Social Ms

The ROI of Storytelling | The Social Ms | How to find and tell your story | Scoop.it
Can we measure the ROI of Storytelling? Some doubt that you can measure the ROI of storytelling. Here is an example where you can.
Kim Zinke (aka Gimli Goose)'s insight:

What a great example!  Sales ads for used cars are typically boring but this seller decided to tell a story instead.  And what results!

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Tell It, Don’t Sell It: The power of storytelling | Generosity Magazine

Tell It, Don’t Sell It: The power of storytelling | Generosity Magazine | How to find and tell your story | Scoop.it

"Australians are known for our generous nature, which has given rise to a robust and diverse giving sector. We’re also characterised by our love of a good yarn – we like telling and hearing stories. It’s no surprise then, that storytelling is an incredibly effective means of communicating key messages for organisations and individuals, particularly in the charitable space.


The power of storytelling cannot be understated, and mustn’t be confused with mere ‘reporting’.


While facts, figures and reporting on impact are important, it’s the stories – and the right people to tell them – that are the most important components of any communications toolkit."


Read the full article to find out more about these five tips for collecting and sharing stories:

  1. Search far and wide for the right storyteller for you
  2. Keep it real
  3. Dare to be different
  4. Use a variety of mediums
  5. Look after your storytellers
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To Build Great Teams, Tell Great Stories | Wakingstar

To Build Great Teams, Tell Great Stories | Wakingstar | How to find and tell your story | Scoop.it

"The best way to build trust? Go from ‘someone they don’t know’ to ‘someone they know.’ Create connection through your stories, the ones that deliver your key messages. Develop your stories, the journeys that reveal your team’s challenges, values, and assets. Show some vulnerability (a key variable in developing trust) in your stories, and reveal the changes your team members have brought to life. Become known. Your candidates have to see the vision for a new life that you’re representing – and why they should become a part of it. Have a rich set of stories to deliver an authentic sense of culture, connection, and opportunity."


Read the full article to find out more about these three types of stories for talent leaders:

  1. values
  2. hurdles
  3. personal insight
Kim Zinke (aka Gimli Goose)'s insight:

With a collection of these three types of stories that you can pull out at will, your connection with candidates will be stronger, trust will be established more quickly, and you’ll be a greater asset to the team that you serve.

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9 Books To Help You Improve Your Presentations | Ethos3

9 Books To Help You Improve Your Presentations | Ethos3 | How to find and tell your story | Scoop.it

"To become a better presenter and leader, step away from the computer, get out of the office, and read one of these 9 books.


If you are like me, and you are feeling inspired to challenge and transform yourself, consider reading one of the books below while sitting in one of your favorite spots outside. These 9 books were selected because they offer insights that can help you refine and elevate your presentation skills."


Read the full article to read the summaries of these books and find out how they'll help you with your presentations and storytelling skills:

  1. Infographics: The Power of Visual Storytelling
  2. Stories that Move Mountains: Storytelling and Visual Design for Persuasive Presentations
  3. The Art of Explanation: Making your Ideas, Products, and Services Easier to Understand
  4. Start with Why: How Great Leaders Inspire Everyone to Take Action
  5. Lead with a Story: A Guide to Crafting Business Narratives That Captivate, Convince, and Inspire
  6. To Sell Is Human: The Surprising Truth About Moving Others
  7. Contagious: Why Things Catch On
  8. Essentialism: The Disciplined Pursuit of Less
  9. Design For How People Learn

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What I've learned in cultural tourism: Seven storytelling tips | Dale Jarvis

What I've learned in cultural tourism: Seven storytelling tips | Dale Jarvis | How to find and tell your story | Scoop.it

"I’ve been running the St. John’s Haunted Hike ghost tour and working as a professional storyteller since 1997, and along the way, I have trained many other storytellers, guides, museum workers and interpreters, volunteers, and docents about telling stories in museums, historic sites, and parks. I was recently asked for a list of things I have learning in a cultural tourism context."


Read the full article to find out more about Dale's seven storytelling tips:

  1. People want to hear good stories, well told
  2. Tourists want to feel like they are in on something local, or something secret
  3. Tell real stories about real people
  4. Tell a story you love, and your audience will love it too
  5. Don’t be afraid of difficult stories
  6. Stories are a living thing
  7. Be mindful of whose stories you are telling, and whose stories are not being told
Kim Zinke (aka Gimli Goose)'s insight:

These rules can also be applied to organizations and personal stories.

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SNMinc WebGems's comment, April 30, 1:56 AM
Good rules to follow for creating attractive content. Capturing audience attention is really important and story telling really helps. Thanks for sharing.
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Beyond the Hero’s Journey: Four innovative models for digital story design | steveseager

Beyond the Hero’s Journey: Four innovative models for digital story design | steveseager | How to find and tell your story | Scoop.it

"Roland Barthes, master linguist and semiotician once said: “There are countless forms of narrative in the world.” And yet the majority of western storytellers have been ploughing just one narrative model for well over 60 years: Joseph Campbell’s Hero’s Journey from the Hero with a Thousand Faces.


While it has its value, Campbell’s model is not a useful model for digital story design on a structural level. Down below, I offer four alternative narrative structures that we could use to design intelligent stories more fitting to our digital context."


Read the full article to find out more about these narrative forms, their differences, and how to apply these forms:

  1. Scandinavian
  2. Indian
  3. Central African
  4. Autochthonous
Kim Zinke (aka Gimli Goose)'s insight:

This article gives some insight about why a story may not be popular across cultures.

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6 Ways to Make Your Story Interesting | Inc.

6 Ways to Make Your Story Interesting | Inc. | How to find and tell your story | Scoop.it

"While any story is better than an bullet list, some stories are more interesting than others. They command an audience's attention, communicate a message both clearly and memorably and thus help the audience to make a decision."


Read the full article for more on these tips for improving your presentations with stories:

  1. Ask permission before telling a story
  2. Anchor the story to a particular time
  3. Anchor the story to a particular place
  4. Feature a hero your audience identifies with
  5. Use concrete words rather than abstractions
  6. End the story with an emotional win
Kim Zinke (aka Gimli Goose)'s insight:

To pull all tips together, the author put the same business message into three different formats: 1) the typical bullet list outline, 2) a basic story told with abstractions, and 3) a story that's concrete and vivid. Notice the difference?

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SENAME Interactive's comment, April 23, 1:33 AM
Yes, I noticed the difference. Did you check basic story and the crafted story section? The crafted one grabs interests, right.
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Guest post: 5 Things (Almost) Everyone Gets Wrong About Storytelling | everyaction

Guest post: 5 Things (Almost) Everyone Gets Wrong About Storytelling | everyaction | How to find and tell your story | Scoop.it

We can use stories and narrative structures as the basis for all communications, and get better results. By telling stories to our audience, we are showing them what they can be a part of; how they can get involved in the action. That is the power of storytelling – we show others how they can play a vital role in that story.

But these days stories are a dime a dozen. There are more organizations out there than ever before competing for attention. While stories can help your organization stand out from the crowd, not all stories are equal."


Read the full article to find out more about these 5 common mistakes that organizations make when telling their stories:

  1. They Don’t Identify Their Audience
  2. Not Creating a Core Message
  3. Skimming Over the Conflict
  4. Telling the Same Story Every Time
  5. A Call to Action
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SENAME Interactive's comment, April 21, 12:48 AM
#5 is really important. This is the one that instruct the reader what they should do after reading the post.
Kim Zinke (aka Gimli Goose)'s comment, April 21, 1:00 AM
Yes an important element for these kinds of stories.
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Six better ways to get customer stories than yet another a “tell us your story” campaign | Holtz communication + technology

Six better ways to get customer stories than yet another a “tell us your story” campaign | Holtz communication + technology | How to find and tell your story | Scoop.it

"While there are great ways to find those customer stories, the easiest (or laziest) seems to be launching a campaign that invites customers to share theirs, like the Arizona Families for Home Education did (at left). So routine has the “tell us your story” campaign become that there’s now a Tumblr blog dedicated to the concept. Tell Us Your Story collects campaigns shared by readers who can submit images, in addition to those ad copywriter Brian Eden finds on his own. Eden is behind the Tumblr blog, which he created after seeing “Tell us your story at drpeppertuition.com” on a Dr. Pepper can he was drinking.


Customer stories are, indeed, important, given they’re more credible than advertising or messaging from your CEO or paid spokespeople. But there are better ways—not necessarily easier, but better—for obtaining customer stories. Just watch some of the testimonial videos from The Mayo Clinic. What you see is heart-felt, authentic, and sincere, not the result of a call to action. How does The Mayo Clinic get these stories? In many cases, they’re shared with the communications team by staff with direct knowledge of the patients’ experience."


Read the full article to find out more about these other sources of customer stories that don’t require you to pimp for them:

  1. Read the messages people send to customer service
  2. Use your monitoring service
  3. Ask your employees
  4. Reach out to your brand ambassadors
  5. Survey your customers
  6. Get your biggest fans in the same room
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Why We Should All Learn the Art of Storytelling Through Family Photos | Save Family Photos

Why We Should All Learn the Art of Storytelling Through Family Photos | Save Family Photos | How to find and tell your story | Scoop.it

"There was once a time that I didn’t think much about my family stories. It’s not that I didn’t care, but I just didn’t make time for it. I think what changed my course was having children. They start asking me questions like, “did you do that when you were a kid?” Or maybe it went more like, “back in the olden days did you…?”


Once I had children, I realized that it was important to share my stories of childhood and family with them. One of the best story prompts is a picture, and it only takes one to start the journey."


Read the full article to find out more about using pictures as story prompts as well as an example of telling a story with a photo.

Kim Zinke (aka Gimli Goose)'s insight:

I love the idea of adding items to a photograph as they did in this article.  It can really enhance the story or fill in gaps.

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How Can Storytelling Help You Create Amazing Web Content? | Inbound

How Can Storytelling Help You Create Amazing Web Content? | Inbound | How to find and tell your story | Scoop.it

"You may be wondering: how could fiction inspire your next ad copy, blog post or website content? In other words, how can you make the most of fabricated concepts that are not even remotely connected to our reality to reach a certain audience, stimulate sales, build trust and credibility and achieve any other marketing goal with minimal effort?


The truth is that there are quite a few similarities between copywriting and fiction writing. According to Writer’s Digest, by relying on first-class fiction storytelling you can make your readers feel your message more intensely and make them become more inclined to buy whatever it is that you’re selling. You also learn to build suspense, embrace a conversational tone, play with different emotions and create one or more memorable characters and situations that are vivid enough to raise the interest of your readers."


Read more about these 10 effective ways in which fiction storytelling can breathe new life into your copy:

  1. By Helping People Understand Your Mission, Vision and Purpose in Business
  2. By Helping Prospects Understand What Your Products Are All About
  3. By Ensuring a Better Visualization of the Bait That You Use to Attract Customers
  4. By Encouraging Customer Feedback
  5. By Turning Business-Specific Stories into Shareable Pieces
  6. By Enabling You to Build a Stronger Relationship with Your Audience
  7. By Helping You Introduce and Explain a New Concept Through Familiar Ones
  8. By Allowing You to Become Noticeable in an Extremely Dynamic Environment
  9. By Unveiling the Recipe for Palatable Web Content
  10. By Improving the Overall User Experience
Kim Zinke (aka Gimli Goose)'s insight:

By exploring the power of fiction storytelling you can identify and mix the elements that resonate with your brand and audience and craft a unique collage.

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Storytelling Tips from Humans of New York | Bateman Group

Storytelling Tips from Humans of New York | Bateman Group | How to find and tell your story | Scoop.it

"Brandon is an entrepreneur and photographer, but most of all he’s an expert at using words and images to capture what it means to be human. He started Human of New York after losing his job and moving to New York with the dream of photographing 10,000 people on the street and plotting them on a map of the city. During this arduous process, he started gathering quotes from the people he photographed and using these words to caption his photos.


Since its beginnings in 2010, HONY has gained 12 million followers on Facebook and 2 million on Instagram, partnered with the UN on a world tour, raised more than $1 million for a school in the Bronx, interviewed President Obama, and published a best-selling book. So this guy must be on to something."


Read the full article to find out more about these five storytelling lessons from HONY:

  1. Be consistent
  2. Work hard
  3. Don't wait for perfect
  4. Be authentic
  5. Keep it brief, but make it meaningful
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Story Starter Tool | Ozge Karaoglu

Story Starter Tool | Ozge Karaoglu | How to find and tell your story | Scoop.it

"Scholastic Story Starters is an online machine that randomly generates a story starter for you. You choose your theme, write your name and grade. Then spin the wheel to get story prompts. Your story starter can be ‘Write three wishes of a giant milkmaid whose tears turn things to stone.’ or ‘Write a mysterious message to a pleasant lion that has a jet pack.’ If you can like, you spin smaller wheels to change different parts of your story starter.  The tool, then, lead you to start writing your story."


Via Cindy Rudy
Kim Zinke (aka Gimli Goose)'s insight:

While this is meant for elementary aged kids, story prompts are great to get the creative juices flowing for any age.  Easy to use.

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How to find and tell a story to support your cause | Anecdote

How to find and tell a story to support your cause | Anecdote | How to find and tell your story | Scoop.it

"Activists know that a personal story has the best chance of influencing a decision. So when they canvas support, they often ask for personal stories that will further their cause.


The problem is that many people who receive such a request don’t really understand what they’re being asked for. They may think they don’t have a story like that to share, or if they do, that they won’t be able to share it in a compelling way."


Read the full article to find out how you can:

  • find a personal story to support your chosen cause
  • tell that story so it has the greatest impact
Kim Zinke (aka Gimli Goose)'s insight:

The author uses an example of marriage equality to explain the steps. It makes it very easy to follow along and then replicate for your own situation.  And don't think these steps only work for causes.  It could easily be used for any organizational or personal stories.

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The Truth About Memoirs — Six Ways To Write A Memoir | Writers Write

The Truth About Memoirs — Six Ways To Write A Memoir | Writers Write | How to find and tell your story | Scoop.it

"Continuing my series of posts on The Truth About Memoirs, I want to talk about ways in which you can tell your stories."


Read the full article to see examples of and find out more about these 6 techniques:

  1. Interior Monologue
  2. Dramatic Monologue
  3. Letter /Email Narration
  4. Diary Entries
  5. Detached Autobiography
  6. Observer Memoir
Kim Zinke (aka Gimli Goose)'s insight:

Techniques you could apply to telling any story.  The examples give you a really good feel for how a story looks when told in that manner.

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How to Find Your Brand's Untold Story: A Case Study | DBD International

How to Find Your Brand's Untold Story: A Case Study | DBD International | How to find and tell your story | Scoop.it

"When reorienting a brand and clarifying their core reason for being, companies are too often satisfied with a shallow exploration, settling on empty cliches when they should be seeking the real concept they’re sincere about and deeply committed to.


The Slippery Part of Finding the Untold Story.  It’s because it’s so obvious to “everyone.”


But when you dig a bit deeper, you discover the “everyone” is made up of all those inside the company, those who breathe this stuff everyday. But those outside the company may never have heard your story.
In other words, since it’s SO obvious to you, you no longer notice or talk about some of those subtleties that make you different. You take them for granted. You simply forget how different your company is compared to all the other choices your audience has."


Read the full article to find out more about:

  • the 3-step formula for fully defining a company’s untold story and unearth the human component
  • the case study of how a dance school, 29 years in business, rebranded and revitalized themselves by finding their untold stories

Via Cendrine Marrouat - SocialMediaSlant.com
Kim Zinke (aka Gimli Goose)'s insight:

How do you redefine a brand after 25 years? American Dance Institute confronted this to give fresh new meaning to their brand. This case study shows how they found their untold story and the products produced to support it.


At the bottom of the article you'll find links to examples of how other companies uncovered their untold stories.  And check out these 19 questions to ask before you start.

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Cendrine Marrouat - SocialMediaSlant.com's curator insight, March 26, 3:37 AM


The secret of a great brand? A deep awareness of what makes you unique and the ability to hear the whispers of your audience when you are in the room -- or away.  


A stellar case study on branding 101 that you will want to bookmark!