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How to find and tell your story
Discovering the art of storytelling by showcasing methods, tips, & tools that help you find and tell your story, your way. Find me on Twitter @gimligoosetales
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Rescooped by Kim Zinke (aka Gimli Goose) from Just Story It! Biz Storytelling
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The Identifiable Victim Effect and How It Affects Your Storytelling | Small Business Trends

The Identifiable Victim Effect and How It Affects Your Storytelling | Small Business Trends | How to find and tell your story | Scoop.it

"Psychologists have a term for our tendency to offer greater aid to an identifiable individual, compared to say, a large group of people. It’s called the Identifiable Victim Effect.  It is why charitable organizations use individuals instead of statistics in their campaigns."

 

Read the full article to find out why.


Via Karen Dietz
Kim Zinke (aka Gimli Goose)'s insight:

If a concept is too big, we can become overwhelmed.  It's easier to see how we could help one person, but it can be hard to see how we could help dozens, thousands, or millions.

 

Fellow curator Karen Deitz's comments (see below) summed up this article beautifully.

"One of the biggest mistakes I see that corporations, non-profits, and individuals make when sharing their business stories is they talk about 'a person' or 'a group' without giving them names and characteristics. In other words, whoever they are talking about are not identifiable.

 

If we don't have a name to hang on to, we can't connect. We want to connect with people. Without a name, 'a person' or 'a group' is just a concept."

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Karen Dietz's comment, June 25, 2013 4:36 PM
Yes Andrew and thank you for sharing! Part of moving from third-person language into 'I' language is the translation from business speak into conversational sharing. Your point is well made. Have a great week.
Carol Sanford's curator insight, June 27, 2013 4:01 PM

This is related to the brain's need to connect the absract and concrete. Innovation, learning and thinking anything new,  are all made possible by having an idea and making sense of it in our real lives. Storytelling is the same. The ideas in it need to be connected to concreteness, therefor a name, for it to 'sink in'.

Karen Dietz's comment, June 29, 2013 3:03 PM
So true Carol! I very much appreciate the comment and insight.
Rescooped by Kim Zinke (aka Gimli Goose) from Just Story It! Biz Storytelling
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Throw a Storytelling Party!

Throw a Storytelling Party! | How to find and tell your story | Scoop.it
Everything you need to know about how to host truly unique storytelling parties. With storytelling ideas, storytelling kits, seasonal party ideas.

 

Hey --it's Sunday and a perfect day to relax and plan for summer fun!

 

I ran across this article that has nothing to do with business storytelling but is a treat nontheless -- Plan a storytelling party! It sure will to build storytelling skills plus learn amazing things while having a good time with friends and family.

 

On this website there is everything you need to know to throw a successful party.

 

Now if you really wanted to apply this to your organization, use all the ideas and suggestions here, just shift the topics to fit your needs. Throw a storytelling party for employees! Throw a storytelling party for customers! Just remember to keep having fun :)


Via Karen Dietz
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