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Rescooped by Christina Hartz from Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools
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New Study: SAT Scores Have No Bearing On College Success

New Study: SAT Scores Have No Bearing On College Success | Financial Aid | Scoop.it
Many students who don't ace the SAT and ACT tests apply to schools that make standardized test scores optional. A new study shows those students do just as well in college as those who submit their scores.

Via Lou Salza
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Lou Salza's curator insight, February 23, 2014 10:26 AM

The college board ( SAT) and (ACT) have been the bane of our existence in the dyslexic community long enough! Time this testing went the way of leeches & bloodletting to treat illness and fevers?--Lou

 

Excerpt:

"..Hiss’ study, “Defining Promise: Optional Standardized Testing Policies in American College and University Admissions,” examined data from nearly three-dozen “test-optional” U.S. schools, ranging from small liberal arts schools to large public universities, over several years.

Hiss found that there was virtually no difference in grades and graduation rates between test “submitters” and “nonsubmitters.” Just 0.05 percent of a GPA point separated the students who submitted their scores to admissions offices and those who did not. And college graduation rates for “nonsubmitters” were just 0.6 percent lower than those students who submitted their test scores..."


“By any statistical methodology [these are] completely trivial differences,” Hiss explains. “The nonsubmitters are doing fine in terms of their graduation rates and GPAs, and significantly outperforming their standardized testing.”

In other words, those students actually performed better in college than their SAT and ACT stores might lead an admissions officer to expect.

HIGH SCHOOL GRADES MATTER

The study has another clear result: High school grades matter — a lot. For both those students who submitted their test results to their colleges and those who did not, high school grades were the best predictor of a student’s success in college. And kids who had low or modest test scores, but good high school grades, did better in college than those with good scores but modest grades.

Hiss says it’s probably not so surprising that a pattern of hard work, discipline and curiosity in high school shows up “as highly predictive, in contrast to what they do in three or four hours on a particular Saturday morning in a testing room.”.."


Rescooped by Christina Hartz from Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools
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OPINION: A School Principal speaks out: Tests are the problem, not the new standards

OPINION: A School Principal speaks out:  Tests are the problem, not the new standards | Financial Aid | Scoop.it
As a long-time principal, I can attest that Common Core raises the bar in a way that will help lift our nation from the industrial model of teaching and learning by promoting better pedagogy.

Via Lou Salza
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Lou Salza's curator insight, February 23, 2014 6:30 PM

This is provocative--even with new high standards, we continue to use old, timed metrics.  

Excerpt:

"....The Partnership for Assessment of Readiness for College and Careers is the body tasked with creating the next generation of Common Core assessments. The implementation of PARRC assessments is what should concern us, not Common Core. One of the countless problems with PARRC is that the assessments are timed. Many underserved urban students will not perform as well on timed typing assessments as their counterparts elsewhere. Are we testing knowledge synthesis or typing skills? Additional problems with gaming the system will become more prevalent as schools track students in an effort to orchestrate when divergent student groups take end of course exams. Further, many districts do not have the hardware to implement the assessments.

Once again, we are relying on a single subject test to assess if students are making the grade, if teachers are doing a good job and if schools are on the right path. Talk about putting all our eggs in one basket! There is a better way. We should look to the Montessori model, Olin College and to the Finns for guidance. Each has jettisoned the factory model of teaching, learning and assessment for a better way. A nation at risk is a nation that continues to put its faith in a single outdated metric. ■"

 Christopher Shaffer is retired campus director of Springfield City Schools.