Italian Neorealism and its Impact on Film
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Italian Neorealism and its Impact on Film
How Italian Neorealism came to be and the impact this era had on films.
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History of Italian Neorealism

History of Italian Neorealism | Italian Neorealism and its Impact on Film | Scoop.it

Italian Neorealism came to be after the fall of Benito Mussolini and his government. The Italian film industry had no studios because most of them were damaged during the war, so famous directors like Luchino Visconti, Roberto Rossellini, and Vittorio de Sica had to shoot in real life locations. Italian Neorealism films started to decline in the 1950s because family income's were starting to rise and Italy as a whole was ready for positive changes with how their country was viewed.

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Roberto Rossellini

Roberto Rossellini | Italian Neorealism and its Impact on Film | Scoop.it
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Roberto Rossellini is said to be the "Father of Neorealism". His films include: "Stromboli", "Open City", and "Germany, Year Zero". Rossellini helped popularize the Italian Neorealism era along with Giuseppe De Santis, Luchino Visconti, and Vittorio De Sica.

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La Terra Trema (Lucine Visconti, 1948)

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La Tera Trema was another film made during the Italian Neorealism era. The film is about a family deciding to sell their own fish in order to get more money than they were already making. This film is a great example of the kind of films being made during the era because non-professional actors were used and it was shot in real locations instead of being done in a studio. The film shows that people are struggling to make a living and it's shot in a documentary style shooting.

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Rome, Open City

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Roberto Rossellini made Rome, Open City immediately after WW2 which meant that the film would show the aftermath of what happened during the war. Italian Neorealism is shown throughout this film with nonprofessional actors and it's also shot in the open streets of Rome. This film was set in Rome and is about the Nazi occupation going on while others tried fighting back and resisting the Nazis in 1944. This film was seen as the beginning to the Italian Neorealism era.

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Italian Neorealism Film Directory

Italian Neorealism Film Directory | Italian Neorealism and its Impact on Film | Scoop.it
Italian Neorealism definitive collection of films, links, articles, and forums. One source for students, filmmakers, and enthusiasts.

Via Brianna
Terrence Glaspy's insight:

This directory shows all different types of films made duirng the Italian Neorealism era. If you scroll to the bottom you're given the names of directors and when you click on your choice you can see all the films that they made.

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Italian Neorealism Characteristics

Italian Neorealism Characteristics | Italian Neorealism and its Impact on Film | Scoop.it
Terrence Glaspy's insight:

During the Italian Neorealism (1944-1952) era many people saw films that were not like what they might have seen before. The amazing thing about Italian Neorealism films was that everything seemed very real. Films during this time were shown in a documentary style, shot in actual locations rather than studios, and instead of having real actors we were given normal people who had normal jobs.

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Vittorio De Sica

Vittorio De Sica | Italian Neorealism and its Impact on Film | Scoop.it
Terrence Glaspy's insight:

Vittorio De Sica is one of the most famous directors from the Italian Neorealism era. He took advantage of post-war Italy and made great films like Bicycle Thieves and Shoeshine. Sica is seen as one of the most influential directors during this time; he was able to take real emotions and put them on screen for everyone to see with real locations and non-professional actors.

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Shoeshine (1946)

Shoeshine (1946) | Italian Neorealism and its Impact on Film | Scoop.it
Terrence Glaspy's insight:

Shoeshine, directed by Vittorio de Sica, is another film that some criitcs call the first Italian Neorealism film. This film is important during this era because it potrays the poverty of young Italian boys and how they have to work in order to own a horse. The young boys in poverty shows a different side that the film like Bicycle Thieves focused on with having young kids going to work in order to get money for themselves or their family. 

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Vittorio De Sica - Bicycle Thieves

Bicyle Thieves was such an important film during the Italian Neorealism era. Like stated before instead of being shot in a typical studio the film used real locations and real life people so the audience could get a real understanding of the struggles that went on after WWII.

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Italian Neorealism's Impact

Italian Neorealism gave its viewers a chance to get a real life look at what happened after post-war World War Two. The famous film, Bicycle Thieves, inspired Bimal Roy to make the film Do Bigha Zamin, which is about a small village in India going through a horrible famine because of a drought and finally getting rain to help produce food.

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