Fighting poverty through medical care
6 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Rachael Huber
Scoop.it!

Physician assistants fill in at the fringes  of health care - NBC News

Physician assistants fill in at the fringes  of health care - NBC News | Fighting poverty through medical care | Scoop.it
Carrie Kowalski, a physician assistant at the Venice Family Clinic in Venice, California, checks Tarzan, one of the homeless patients she seeks out to care f...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Rachael Huber
Scoop.it!

The health crisis in developing countries

more...
Rachael Huber's comment, February 12, 2014 1:23 PM
"14 million people die each year from infectious diseases, many of which are preventable or treatable" (Oh, Cecilia). Many factors cause such a rate of death and they include poverty, lack of access to health services, and water and sanitation. "Of the 36 million people with HIV/AIDS in the world, 25 million are in sub-saharan Africa" (Oh, Cecilia). This horrible epidemic has brought up the issue of affordability to treat it.
Scooped by Rachael Huber
Scoop.it!

Doctor Proves that Quality Health Care is Possible in the Third World

Doctor Proves that Quality Health Care is Possible in the Third World | Fighting poverty through medical care | Scoop.it
Millions of deaths in developing countries can be prevented by access to basic health care. Some medical professionals are doing something about it.
more...
Rachael Huber's comment, February 11, 2014 1:35 PM
Because a little girl was Jamaican and couldn't afford to be flown to America, she died. This shows how America has easy access to care where people in third-world countries don't. A doctor from Jamaica named Dr. Ernest Madu is on his way to changed this.
Rachael Huber's comment, February 12, 2014 1:12 PM
Dr. Madu started the Heart Institute of the Caribbean to help the underprivileged receive the care they need. He only charges them the amount they can pay. He can perform surgeries that otherwise wouldn't be available in Jamaica. He gets donations in order to perform this care and treats from 5,000- 12,000 patients every year. His degree is from the US so he knows exactly how to treat them, at a fraction of the normal price.
Scooped by Rachael Huber
Scoop.it!

Medical Care in the Third World

Medical Care in the Third World | Fighting poverty through medical care | Scoop.it
gr8 Pledging for Change : The third world is being ravaged by health problems that would be easily preventable if the basic infrastructure of the affected countries w[..]
more...
Rachael Huber's comment, February 17, 2014 1:02 PM
According to recent reports, 11 million children die every year because of a lack of basic health care, food, sanitation, and clean water ( Fowler, Amy). These problems could be easily preventable if there was any infrastructure. To help them, it needs to start out with foreign aid, but eventually they need to be able to do it on their own. They need outside sources to come and teach them what to do so a while from now they will have a solid infrastructure and function medically on their own.
Rachael Huber's comment, February 17, 2014 1:05 PM
By educating the people in third world countries, these relief programs can help for the future. They help them out, then teach them the right way such as informing them on the spread of AIDS. Such relief programs provide help in the way of field hospitals and sanitation projects.
Scooped by Rachael Huber
Scoop.it!

Preventable Health Issues in Third World Countries

Geography ISU.
more...
Rachael Huber's comment, February 17, 2014 1:10 PM
17 million people die from preventable diseases. and 8 million of these deaths are children under the age of 5 (Thomas, Sophie). Child birth is a huge issue in third world countries. Tuberculosis effects 8.8 million people a year.
Rachael Huber's comment, February 17, 2014 1:14 PM
Getting to a health center in these third world countries is often very difficult. Around 6 million people die from Typhoid each year, a disease we get a shot for and never have to worry about. "1/7 girls marries and has children before the age of 15 making them 5 times more likely to die at childbirth" (Thomas, Sophie).
Rachael Huber's comment, February 17, 2014 1:21 PM
So many people wonder why all these preventable diseases continue to kill so many in third world countries. One reason is that pharmaceutical companies have a hard time getting medicine approved to be used in these countries. Also the people that are in these countries have poor medical training and don't know how to handle these situations. Another reason is religious customs in these countries can cause medical problems so people can't come into the countries and say that is banned. Lastly, like anything problem, money is a huge reason why these people can't receive proper care.
Scooped by Rachael Huber
Scoop.it!

Improving the Quality of Care in Developing Countries - Disease Control Priorities in Developing Countries - NCBI Bookshelf

Improving the Quality of Care in Developing Countries - Disease Control Priorities in Developing Countries - NCBI Bookshelf | Fighting poverty through medical care | Scoop.it
more...
Rachael Huber's comment, February 11, 2014 1:24 PM
When an individual can get better quality of care, they benefit because they are physically, emotionally, and mentally healthier. For instance, “higher-quality prenatal and postnatal care not only decreases mortality but also improves subsequent school performance, which is critical to future labor productivity” (Van der Gaag 2000). The healthier the individual, the higher the income. This also applies to a country as a while, where there is higher worker productivity with healthy individuals. “The high prevalence of such diseases as malaria has been linked in some studies to a slowing of economic growth by one to two percentage points per year” (Sachs 2001). As a wrap up, a study shows “cross-country data suggest that a one-year increase in life expectancy is associated with an increase in the gross domestic product (GDP) growth rate of 1 to 4 percentage points” ( Bloo, Canning, and Sevilla 2001).
Rachael Huber's comment, February 11, 2014 1:30 PM
In order for a country to have better medical care, they need more quality, not necessarily quantity. “Eliminating poor quality involves not only giving better care but also eliminating under provision of essential clinical services; stopping overuse of some care; and ending misuse of unneeded services.” (Peabody, Taguiwalo, Robalino, and Frenk.) By improving the quality of areas like diagnosis and treatment, a country’s population can be healthier therefore giving them an opportunity to grow as a country.