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Divine Vintage: Following the Wine Trail from Genesis to the Modern Age

Divine Vintage: Following the Wine Trail from Genesis to the Modern Age | 'Winebanter' | Scoop.it

Winner of the Gourmand Wine Books prize for 'Best Drinks Writing Book' in the UK
A fascinating journey through ancient wine country that reveals the drinking habits of early Christians, from Abraham to Jesus.
Wine connoisseur Joel Butler teamed up with biblical historian Randall Heskett for a remarkable adventure that travels the biblical wine trail in order to understand what kinds of wines people were drinking 2,000 to 3,500 years ago. Along the way, they discover the origins of wine, unpack the myth of Shiraz, and learn the secrets of how wine infiltrated the biblical world. This fascinating narrative is full of astounding facts that any wine lover can take to their next tasting, including the myths of the Phoenician, Greek, Roman, and Jewish wine gods, the emergence of kosher wine, as well as the use of wine in sacrifices and other rites. It will also take a close a look at contemporary modern wines made with ancient techniques, and guide the reader to experience the wines Noah (the first wine maker!) Abraham, Moses and Jesus drank.

 


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True Grape: So easy to fall in love (with wine) in Verona, Italy

True Grape: So easy to fall in love (with wine) in Verona, Italy | 'Winebanter' | Scoop.it

It’s appropriate that the country producing both the greatest quantity and greatest variety of wine in the world should also host the globe’s largest wine show.

Over 4,200 wineries and 140,000 wine lovers gathered last week in the literary home of Romeo and Juliet, which seems fitting as the event is frequently billed as “another love story in Verona.”

What follow are some Italian grape varietals that you may not have heard of, but your palate is sure to be rewarded by making the effort to seek out these wines.

Lacrima di Morro d'Alba

The name means teardrop and the grape is found in the central east coast region of Le Marche. Typical aromas of roses with wild strawberries and a beautiful juicy vinous character. Used to produce still red wines, sweet wines and unique and delicious sparkling.

Pecorino

Mostly found in Le Marche and Abruzzo regions resulting in white wines with fresh and delicate aromas, full on the palate with mineral notes, some fresh herbs and citrus.


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Elisabetta Tosi's curator insight, June 5, 2013 5:36 AM

Verona is a very special experience in the Italian world of wine: in a few kilometers, you can have all the wines - red, white, rosé, sparkling, still, sweet - from both native and international grapes you can wish to drink...

All.

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Wine of the Day: Lucchetti Lacrima Di Morro d’Alba 2011

Wine of the Day: Lucchetti Lacrima Di Morro d’Alba 2011 | 'Winebanter' | Scoop.it

Lucchetti Lacrima Di Morro d’Alba 2011
Marches, Italy
$17.95, 88 points, Vintages 310094

Lacrima de Morro d’Alba is from Marche on the Adriatic (not related to the town/region of Alba in Piedmont. This is a very fruity, soft, rounded and pleasant young red with purple-ruby colour and generous aromas of candied plums, red licorice twizzler and some leesy character. It’s medium weight, soft and well balanced with the barest dusting of tannin. The length is good. Chill lightly. 


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Valturio - Tour of the property & wines with proprietor Adriano Galli

The wine estate Azienda Agricola Valturio was founded by Adriano Galli and Isabella Santarelli in 2002 with the aim of restoring the production of high quality wine to Montefeltro following centuries-old traditions that date from the times of the Dukes of Montefeltro to the beginning of the last century.
At the beginning of the nineteen hundreds, the Antimi Clari family, one of the most illustrious of Macerata Feltria, repeatedly won gold medals at the National Wine Exposition of Turin and traces of old barriques can still be found in the cellars of Palazzo Gentili Belli.
The late lawyer Egisto Gentile Belli narrated that at the beginning of the last century, his family was supplying products from its spinning-mills to France in exchange for small oak barrels used for aging wine.


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Lalium Verdicchio Dei Castelli Di Jesi Classico Riserva 2009 – Fattoria Laila

Lalium Verdicchio Dei Castelli Di Jesi Classico Riserva 2009 – Fattoria Laila | 'Winebanter' | Scoop.it

"Made from 100% Verdicchio. After a careful thinning out in vineyard follows a soft grapes pressing previously cooled. During a fermentation of 15 days at Fattoria Laila wineries on its cask, must is preserved at a low temperature in special thermo barrels. The fermentation ended, wine is put on barrique and everyday moved to keep the lees suspended. The color is bright straw yellow with greenish reflections. The nose is delicate, with a slight fragrance of wild flowers. On the palate it is dry and smoothly with a slightly bitter aftertaste (This wine can be considered as one of the highest quality white wines). Food pairing suggestions include aperitifs, starters and fish." - Winery
"Fattoria Laila in Corinaldo lies in the rolling hills of the Marche, overlooking the Adriatic Sea on the east coast of Italy. Verdicchio and Montepulciano, indigenous varieties in our 'Il Libretto' project, are cultivated here under the guidance of Lorenzo Landi, enologist, who has helped to establish strict limits in the vineyard in order to craft excellent wines. Today, Laila is the leading vineyard project in all of the Marches, with densities that reach 8,000 plants per hectare, based on viticultural research not practiced anywhere else in this region."
"In 1990, Andrea Crocenzi took over the Fattoria Laila preserving many of the traditional methods of farming, but introducing new technology into the cellar and improved vineyard plantings to bring a centuries old estate up to date. His wines reflect the characteristics of his own charismatic and hard working personality: Elegance and Exuberance. An important momentum has been added with the arrival of Lorenzo Landi, winemaker with great experience, who has helped Andrea Croscenzi focus on a style unique to this winery."
This was rated 87 points in the Wine Enthusiast.


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Tasting Montepulciano

Tasting Montepulciano | 'Winebanter' | Scoop.it

Retrospective on the Montepulciano of Le Marche and Abruzzo, which will give an idea of the vine’s potential.[...]

 

Conero Dorico Riserva, 2005, Moroder - Pure Montepulciano. It looks menacing from the start, dark, with purple tones. A monument to these lands’ beauty, it’s concentrated, a potential masterpiece, densely fruity, perfectly fused in powerful tannic weaves that persists until a savory finale. Its fierce tannin requires a Sacrifice of Korean-Barbecue Ribs. It will easily get to twenty years. Score: 90. €20.Conero Vision of J riserva, 2006, Le Terrazze - The house’s first born, which gets only the best vintages—and it shows. Elegant in its deep, fruity notes of sour cherry and blackberry, its spicy wealth and its savory suggestions that come from the sea, a luminous window opened in a dark tannic score. This wine has great personality and consistency, which make it one of the great standards of the area. Its fine bouquet can be accompanied by Game Pies or, even, Turkish Shish Kebabs with a Garlicky Tahini. Score: 91. €25.Kurni, 2008, Oasi degli Angeli - Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony in a bottle. Only six thousand bottles per year make the Kurni a pure temptation, an idea that became substance. This is its greatest quality, to elevate itself above matter and aim for the Absolute. Its appearance is imperturbable like ink, splendid, a whirlpool of red fruit in many forms—fresh, caramelized, in alcohol, in a frappé, in ice cream, in yogurt—but also rose, mulberry, carnation, licorice, iris, aniseed, coffee, cinnamon, tobacco, china root, rhubarb, ginger, myrtle. It’s a surprising fugue of flavors that finds no rest. The magnificence of its taste is amplified by a warm texture, while tannins are under control. Its sweet intensity make it taste almost like a passito, the dream of a sweet-toothed kid. One wonders if such roundness isn’t maybe too much, too frivolous, but this feeling doesn’t last, and becomes fresher, sharper, a statuesque body behind this softness. A wine for meditation, it performs at best with a Castelmagno cheese or Duck with Orange. Score: 95. €80.Regina del Bosco, 2007, Fattoria Dezi - A strong-willed wine, which encompasses all the nuances typical of the vine, the ruby color, the clear fruits and massive character. The sweet concentration of wild strawberries and cocoa turn it into an irresistible syrup. The taste flows boldly. Its warmth is persistent, yet never overwhelming. Pair Roasted Pig with Plums or Canadian Onion Soup. Score 92. €28.Full Article


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Italian Grapes: a world to discover

Italian Grapes: a world to discover | 'Winebanter' | Scoop.it

Italy is home to large amount of grape varieties. Sangiovese, Barbera and Montepulciano d’Abruzzo are well-known throughout the world and are the basis for many fantastic wines. Most known where these grapes are grown but what is with Fiano d’Avellino, Vermentino, Aglianico or Corvina? The latter one for example is the basis for all Amarone wines.

Here is an alphabetical list most Italian grape varieties. The most important ones are highlighted.

Albana (white)

Native grape of the Emilia-Romagna. Albana di Romagna DOCG is famous throughout Italy.

Aglianico (red)

Primarily grown in Campania and Basilicata. Aglianico del Vulture DOCG is a stunning wine from Basilicata.

Aleatico (red)

Often found in Puglia and other Southern Italian regions. Many desert wines are made from this grape.

Arneis (white)

This grape has its home in Piedmont. Mostly grown in the hills northwest of Alba. Roero DOC wines made with Arneis are usually dry, full body white wines. Grappa is also manufactured from Arneis grapes.

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Vino in Love 's comment, October 10, 2012 1:48 PM
Thanks for all the rescooping! I'm happy you all like my guide!
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Rosso Conero: The (better?) Montepulciano from further north

Rosso Conero: The (better?) Montepulciano from further north | 'Winebanter' | Scoop.it

[...] Well, in the Marche region just to the north of Abruzzo, the Montepulciano vine also covers lots of square hectares of earth, but because none of its appellations’ names include the word “Montepulciano”, growing regions like Rosso Conero which is typically made from 100% Montepulciano [...] The word “Conero” in this wine’s name refers to the appellation’s proximity to Marche’s coastal city of Ancona.[...]

Villa Malacari Rosso Conero 2008
Saturated blackish purple color. Big and expressive nose of wood-smokey black cherry and dried cranberry fruit wonderfully supported by clear notes of melted dark chocolate, black licorice, damp earth, dried herbs, gingerbread, motor oil, and lilac powder. In the mouth the wine is full-bodied with a chewy texture, smooth tannins, and a great balance overall that effortlessly reveals sweet and sour black raspberry and currant fruit and notes of espresso coffee and new leather. Long, rustically elegant finish.


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Wine Spotlight: A taste of spring with wines really smelling like flowers

Wine Spotlight: A taste of spring with wines really smelling like flowers | 'Winebanter' | Scoop.it

Take a deep breath. No, into your wine glass. Can you smell that? It’s spring.

Yes, the first day of spring was yesterday, which had me thinking — I know I’ve heard of wines having a “floral nose.” But how much can wine really smell like flowers?

Turns out, it can quite a bit. Moscato, Gewurztraminer and torrontes are among the most-aromatic white wines, according to Jonna Brandon at The Twisted Vine; shiraz, syrah, lacrima and schioppettino are the top picks when it comes to reds. (And, if you’re so inclined, Fiano di Avellino has a spearmint scent — but doesn’t taste of it.)

Some have just a whiff of floral notes that, among others, the discerning nose might not even register. Others are so strong and clear that anyone would notice them. For the most part, though, the “wines with floral aromatics” — as the owner of the Grandview shop calls them — are minor grapes that many people haven’t heard of. To an attuned nose, the scents can range from earthy geranium to sweet orange blossom and lilies.

If you’re interested in sniffing out this phenomenon for yourself, I would suggest you sample one like I did: the Kerria Lacrima di Morro D’Alba ($17 at The Twisted Vine). Brandon had me sold when she likened the scent to roses and lilies, and she couldn’t have been more right.

This one was so convincingly floral-smelling, I wasn’t sure it would taste like wine. But it did — dry and more spicy than fruity, but still light on the tongue. Plus, I loved that it was a pleasure to inhale with each sip (swirl it and allow it to settle first to get the best read).

How wine comes to have that characteristic is up for debate, Brandon said — some winemakers think it’s influenced by the soil, while others say it has to do with how ripe the grapes are when they’re picked.

We’ll leave that debate to the professionals. In the meantime, care to cheers the start of spring with a glass of wine?


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lablanche david's curator insight, March 25, 2013 12:16 PM

vins vite petit pringtemps

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Le Caniette Rosso Bello

Michelangelo gave the name 'Rosso Bello' or Beautiful Red to a brilliant red color that this full bodied wine is named after. This wine was produced in the land of Ascanio Condivi, named after the apprentice, friend and biographer of Michelangelo. You will find this wine intense and persistent recalling red fruits, cherries, rose petals & violets.


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Umani Ronchi presentation

A collection of images through vineyards, ageing cellar and wines, together with Bernetti family, owner of Umani Ronchi since over 50 years


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Clearing Up Confusion with Montepulciano

Clearing Up Confusion with Montepulciano | 'Winebanter' | Scoop.it

Despite the name, the grape called Montepulciano has nothing to do with the town of the same name in Toscana, nor does it have any relationship with the wine Vino Nobile di Montepulciano, which comes from Toscana. Rather, Montepulciano, the grape, is cultivated throughout Central Italy, from Le Marche to Apulia and most specifically in Abruzzo. Montepulciano is a varietal that makes a tremendously pleasing wine characterized by low acidity, manageable tannins, and a combination of the roundness of Merlot with the pepper and black fruit of Syrah. Known best for its DOC appellation Montepulciano d’Abruzzo, this varietal is said to have originated in Abruzzo, but it also appears in several other DOC wines throughout central Italy.
Montepulciano d’Abruzzo DOC, created in 1968, covers more or less the entire eastern half of its titular province. Despite the similarity in name, Montepulciano d’Abruzzo ought not be confused with Toscana’s Vino Nobile de Montepulciano, named for its nearest town, Montepulciano. Indigenous to Abruzzo, Montepulciano grows happily throughout the rugged terrain of central Italy, and the varietal forms the central component of this DOC and that of Le Marche’s Rosso Cònero, as well as serving as a recommended varietal for many others.
This grape possesses an extremely easy-going nature, thriving particularly well around the foothills of the Apennines near the town of Teramo, the site of its DOCG appellation, Montepulciano d’Abruzzo Colline Teramane. Although it suffers the reputation of being a little brother to some of the region’s better known wines, the medium-bodied, ruby-red, Montepulciano d’Abruzzo provides a very pleasant wine for a very good value. Lightly tannic but bouncy with acidity, this wine with a palate of berries and violets also has an intriguing spiciness that complements the region’s predilection for foods laced with hot peppers. The slightly sweet tannins of Montepulciano d’Abruzzo keep it lively in the bottle, but unchanged as it ages. Recent interest in playing with techniques in cultivation and vinification, however, may help make the genial Montepulciano d’Abruzzo become a more complex and burly wine in the future.
Montepulciano d’Abruzzo comes in four types. Vinified like a white with a short maceration on the skins, Cerasuolo is its rosé style, named for its bright cherry-red color. An unusually jaunty rosé, Cerasuolo can stand up to spicy foods; its DOC regulations allow for 85% Montepulciano and up to 15% of other local varietals, often Sangiovese. Montepulciano d’Abruzzo Rosso has the same grape allowances as the Cerasuolo, though it is vinified as a red with a longer maceration; this DOC also comes in a riserva form that requires 24 months of ageing. Montepulciano d’Abruzzo’s Casauria and Terre dei Vestini DOC types both require 100% Montepulciano, and both have riserva forms that require 24 months of ageing.
The best thing about Montepulciano d’Abbruzzo wines–other than their general deliciousness–is that they tend to be super affordable, offering a fresh, easy way to serve quality Italian wines any night of the week.


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Appassionata's curator insight, February 7, 2013 6:45 AM

Intersting article about the Montepulciano grape we are growing.....

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The First Wine I Ever Hated: Lacrima di Morro d’Alba

The First Wine I Ever Hated: Lacrima di Morro d’Alba | 'Winebanter' | Scoop.it
I remember the first wine I actively DESPISED. This wine made me heartily want to puke. I could not get it away from me; the sticky-spicy scent of a closet littered with potpourri satchels hung in my nostrils, pervading my sinuses, clinging like your great aunt’s perfume after a lingering hug—strong and alarmingly persistent.
The wine was a red Lacrima di Morro d’Alba. [...]
Perhaps in 2005, my virgin palate was shallow, ignorant, and uncouth! Perhaps my uneducated tongue was simply too immature to recognize Lacrima di Morro d’Alba’s charm.
…Fast forward to right now: I open the 2009 Luigi Giusti Lacrima di Morro d’Alba. I swirl. I sniff. That piquant scent absolutely leaps out of the glass. It clings tenaciously to my nostrils and my tongue, just like auntie’s perfume, just like I remembered it. As the dear Sam, who sold me this bottle at Biondivino, said: “It’s a polarizing wine. You either love it or you hate it.”
I give it a chance to open up [...]
In Wine Grapes, Jancis explains, “the name Lacrima (English ‘teardrop’) was probably given to this variety because when the berries are fully ripe, they exude small drops of juice.”
To my taste, the grapes may as well have exuded thousands of tiny potpourri satchels, because the wine smells as if someone steeped these satchels in the fermenting juice: there’s dried roses, lilies, violets, lavender, juniper, what I think myrtle berries must smell like, plus cinnamon sticks and allspice—the whole shebang in there.
A wine this strong could get scary without a kick of acid to lift it up and carry it along, but once you get past the freaky-potent aromatics, the wine lights up with a great streak of acidity. The tannins are mellow but not absent, giving it a soft texture, cruising along in stride with black pepper, Red Hots, and star anise. The whole thing finishes with a slathering of blackberry jam bringing up the rear. As I sip, I have a sudden craving for lamb chops sprinkled with sea salt, rosemary, maybe a little balsamic reduction. Or, moussaka… or, hey… Maybe Linguine Mare Chiaro, bella.

2009 Luigi Giusti Lacrima di Morro d’Alba (Marche, Italy)
The Grape: Lacrima di Morro d’Alba
The Region: Marche, Italy
Retail price: $22
The Importer: Vinity Wine Company
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Mariano Pallottini's curator insight, December 11, 2012 8:07 AM

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Luigi Silvestri's curator insight, December 22, 2012 7:18 AM

Lacrima can only be found in Marche Region.

http://www.accantogroup.com/accantowine

luigi.silvestri@accantogroup.com