'Winebanter'
Follow
983 views | +0 today
'Winebanter'
Anything wine related
Curated by jimkelly38
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by jimkelly38 from Wines and People
Scoop.it!

True Grape: So easy to fall in love (with wine) in Verona, Italy

True Grape: So easy to fall in love (with wine) in Verona, Italy | 'Winebanter' | Scoop.it

It’s appropriate that the country producing both the greatest quantity and greatest variety of wine in the world should also host the globe’s largest wine show.

Over 4,200 wineries and 140,000 wine lovers gathered last week in the literary home of Romeo and Juliet, which seems fitting as the event is frequently billed as “another love story in Verona.”

What follow are some Italian grape varietals that you may not have heard of, but your palate is sure to be rewarded by making the effort to seek out these wines.

Lacrima di Morro d'Alba

The name means teardrop and the grape is found in the central east coast region of Le Marche. Typical aromas of roses with wild strawberries and a beautiful juicy vinous character. Used to produce still red wines, sweet wines and unique and delicious sparkling.

Pecorino

Mostly found in Le Marche and Abruzzo regions resulting in white wines with fresh and delicate aromas, full on the palate with mineral notes, some fresh herbs and citrus.


Via Mariano Pallottini
more...
Elisabetta Tosi's curator insight, June 5, 2013 5:36 AM

Verona is a very special experience in the Italian world of wine: in a few kilometers, you can have all the wines - red, white, rosé, sparkling, still, sweet - from both native and international grapes you can wish to drink...

All.

Rescooped by jimkelly38 from Wines and People
Scoop.it!

Wine of the Day: Lucchetti Lacrima Di Morro d’Alba 2011

Wine of the Day: Lucchetti Lacrima Di Morro d’Alba 2011 | 'Winebanter' | Scoop.it

Lucchetti Lacrima Di Morro d’Alba 2011
Marches, Italy
$17.95, 88 points, Vintages 310094

Lacrima de Morro d’Alba is from Marche on the Adriatic (not related to the town/region of Alba in Piedmont. This is a very fruity, soft, rounded and pleasant young red with purple-ruby colour and generous aromas of candied plums, red licorice twizzler and some leesy character. It’s medium weight, soft and well balanced with the barest dusting of tannin. The length is good. Chill lightly. 


Via Mariano Pallottini
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by jimkelly38 from Wines and People
Scoop.it!

Wine Spotlight: A taste of spring with wines really smelling like flowers

Wine Spotlight: A taste of spring with wines really smelling like flowers | 'Winebanter' | Scoop.it

Take a deep breath. No, into your wine glass. Can you smell that? It’s spring.

Yes, the first day of spring was yesterday, which had me thinking — I know I’ve heard of wines having a “floral nose.” But how much can wine really smell like flowers?

Turns out, it can quite a bit. Moscato, Gewurztraminer and torrontes are among the most-aromatic white wines, according to Jonna Brandon at The Twisted Vine; shiraz, syrah, lacrima and schioppettino are the top picks when it comes to reds. (And, if you’re so inclined, Fiano di Avellino has a spearmint scent — but doesn’t taste of it.)

Some have just a whiff of floral notes that, among others, the discerning nose might not even register. Others are so strong and clear that anyone would notice them. For the most part, though, the “wines with floral aromatics” — as the owner of the Grandview shop calls them — are minor grapes that many people haven’t heard of. To an attuned nose, the scents can range from earthy geranium to sweet orange blossom and lilies.

If you’re interested in sniffing out this phenomenon for yourself, I would suggest you sample one like I did: the Kerria Lacrima di Morro D’Alba ($17 at The Twisted Vine). Brandon had me sold when she likened the scent to roses and lilies, and she couldn’t have been more right.

This one was so convincingly floral-smelling, I wasn’t sure it would taste like wine. But it did — dry and more spicy than fruity, but still light on the tongue. Plus, I loved that it was a pleasure to inhale with each sip (swirl it and allow it to settle first to get the best read).

How wine comes to have that characteristic is up for debate, Brandon said — some winemakers think it’s influenced by the soil, while others say it has to do with how ripe the grapes are when they’re picked.

We’ll leave that debate to the professionals. In the meantime, care to cheers the start of spring with a glass of wine?


Via Mariano Pallottini
more...
lablanche david's curator insight, March 25, 2013 12:16 PM

vins vite petit pringtemps