Feminomics - gend...
Follow
Find tag "leadership"
701 views | +0 today
Feminomics - gender balanced leadership
New perspectives on leadership from a gender perspective - and its relevance to business, politics, economics, the environment and home.
Curated by Erika Watson
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Erika Watson from Gender-Balanced Leadership
Scoop.it!

Women, Wealth, and Power: The Emerging Paradigm

Women, Wealth, and Power: The Emerging Paradigm | Feminomics - gender balanced leadership | Scoop.it

Let me make one thing very clear: I’m not trying to typecast genders or suggest one superior to the other. There are plenty of women operating in the Male Model, while increasingly, men are embracing the Feminine Formula.

What I am describing is an emerging paradigm shift, allowing both men and women the freedom to choose between the historical norm and what’s becoming a clear, increasingly preferred, leadership style. And we have women to thank for this shift.

“Today the old style command-and-control leadership has given way to a new approach to leadership.” says leadership expert David Gergen, a Harvard professor and former advisor to four presidents, in his introduction to Enlightened Power: How Women are Transforming the Practice of Leadership.

“When we describe that new leadership, we employ terms like consensual, web-based, caring, inclusive, open, transparent—all qualities that we associate with the ‘feminine’ style of leadership.”


Via Marion Chapsal
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Erika Watson from Gender-Balanced Leadership
Scoop.it!

Leadership with Heart & Soul Gentle Giant Moving

Leadership with Heart & Soul Gentle Giant Moving | Feminomics - gender balanced leadership | Scoop.it

One among many examples of leadership based on both masculine (tough-love marine) and feminine (caring, nurturing, empathy) values.

Women don't have the monopoly of the Feminine Archetype!

Larry O'Toole says Gentle Giant Moving is a people and leadership development company providing high-end customer service.

Larry O'Toole understands that when customers are difficult, it's often because they are going through something really hard. So the employees of his moving company learn not only how to pack trucks but also how to unpack the contents of the human heart. "You don't know what kind of stress someone is dealing with," says O'Toole, an Irish immigrant who is imposing of stature and soft of speech. "Diagnosed with a terrible illness. Death in the family. Divorce. You have to be able to read your customer. You see what they need, and you give it to them."


Via Marion Chapsal
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Erika Watson from Gender-Balanced Leadership
Scoop.it!

Leadership and Gender: Why It Matters and How It's Changing

Leadership and Gender: Why It Matters and How It's Changing | Feminomics - gender balanced leadership | Scoop.it

Some history first...

So many women, so few in leadership roles - why?
The window of opportunity to free women and men from the confines of gender stereotypes is opening now. To take advantage of and further this change it is important to understand the history of gender roles, particularly in relation to leadership, and why the shift is happening now.Longstanding stereotypes about men being strong and assertive and women being communal, soft and understanding are key to understanding why women who are successful achievers are typically not in key leadership roles. But this begs a bigger question. Why do we think of leadership as masculine in the first place? And how does seeing leadership in this way create a blind spot for leadership done differently but with the same – or even better – results?
A brief history of leadership in the 20th century begins to answer the first question. In the early 1900′s when most people were not well-educated, the “great man” theory espoused leadership by a small number of men thought to possess superior intellectual and moral capabilities. Three factors led to a shift away from this theory after World War II. First, the G.I. bill enabled more men to become well educated. At the same time the manufacturing industry in the U.S. was booming and creating a need for more managers. Finally, as college educated G.I.’s filled these roles they formed a generation of managers and leaders who shared the military’s command and control style. These factors perpetuated hierarchical organizations with cascading levels of management and the prevalence of the command and control model. In this system, most leaders were men and leadership was equated with masculine traits including the tendency to be dominant, aggressive, and individualistic, to take charge, provide answers and exert control. (1)

In the late 20th century as women took on management roles they had to learn how to survive in the command and control culture. It is a well-known phenomenon that minority group members who enter the dominant culture blend in at first and are especially likely to be seen in stereotypical terms when they are viewed as tokens. Consultants who work on diversity issues refer to the “rule of three” – the need to include at least three members of a minority group in order for their voices to be heard and to influence the dominant culture. As a result of being one or two among a peer group of men women in business roles still walk a very tight line. They live in a double bind. Women are required to demonstrate just enough masculinity – assertiveness and individualism – and to balance this with the right degree of femininity – softness and and community orientation. They receive little credit for either and are subject to criticism if they stray too much to either side. “A woman who is strong and assertive, a command and control type, is seen as difficult and bitchy, but a woman who is warm and helpful is seen as weak and incompetent,” says Carli. On the other hand when men are warm, empathic, and thoughtful they are perceived very favorably but behaving this way is seen as a bonus not a requirement. Men have more leeway and options for how to lead. Women have fewer degrees of freedom and are held to different and higher standards. As a result they have to be more conscious of everything they do, another factor that makes their challenge more difficult.

 

(extract from Dr Anne Perschel's must read post. Picture is mine)


Via Marion Chapsal
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Erika Watson from Gender-Balanced Leadership
Scoop.it!

Helen Clark: Inclusion and Equality: Why Women’s Leadership Matters | UNDP

Helen Clark: Inclusion and Equality: Why Women’s Leadership Matters | UNDP | Feminomics - gender balanced leadership | Scoop.it

My starting point is that it is a basic human right for women to enjoy full legal equality and equality of opportunity, and for a girl born today, in any country, to have the same life prospects as any boy. All our societies are the poorer if they fail to tap the full potential of half their population, and do not remove the obstacles which so often prevent women from rising to leadership positions in political systems and elsewhere.
I do believe that having a critical mass of women in leadership and decision-making positions is positive for human development in all countries – whether developed or developing, and whether countries are living in peace, recovering from conflict, or in the process of a democratic transition.


Via Marion Chapsal
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Erika Watson from Gender-Balanced Leadership
Scoop.it!

3 Reasons You Don't Want Women Leaders

3 Reasons You Don't Want Women Leaders | Feminomics - gender balanced leadership | Scoop.it

 

An excellent article by Victoria Pynchon to share without moderation.

There’s nothing genetically different about women that makes them good, better or best. It’s their outsider status from the corporate norm that allows them to create their own worlds and unite peripheral and disenfranchised communities into collectively governed organizations.

Couple that with the survival skills developed in response to a lack of access to resources and you’ve got leaders who break forms, eliminate bureaucracy, promote the talented and demote the brother-in-law with no imagination and few skills whose well-being is at the center of the CEO’s marginally happy home life.

Don’t be fooled. There’s a reason women haven’t raised themselves up into leadership positions across all industries anywhere near to 20%.

Here are the top three reasons why you’ll want to dig your heels into the ground and continue resisting the emergence of a new class of leaders in American. (...go to Forbes website). Here's a tasty sample:

You run at business-speed. And business-speed no longer permits deliberation. You know what to expect from an anglo-saxon white guy. Why trouble yourself with the pussy-whipped HR department’s diversity and inclusivity goals? You’ve got a Fortune 50 division to run or an AmLaw 10 practice group to manage. You’re not striving for perfection here. Just “good enough.”

So, don’t bring women into the power structure even as the evidence continues to pour in about the bottom-line benefits they bring to your organizations. It’s just too damn hard.


Via Marion Chapsal
more...
No comment yet.