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Normative Gendered Messages

Normative Gendered Messages | Feminism | Scoop.it

 

Here are two shirts are from the Avengers.  Both are designed for their children apparel production line, but I don't have to tell you which one is marketed for boys and which one is marketed for girls.


Questions to ponder: How (and why) do companies use cultural ideas and values to market their products?  How do companies shape cultural ideas and values?  What impact do messages like this have on a society's culture?  Do seemingly subtle differences is pop cultural products like this matter?  

 

Tags: perspective, culture, gender,  popular culture.


Via Seth Dixon
Michele Baker's insight:

This is a really depressing trend, and one that, as the parent of a daughter, I am all too aware of. It's way past time we start rethinking the way we dictate gender roles in children.

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Sabrina Conroy's curator insight, July 15, 2013 11:42 AM
We live in a world where this shouldn't even be an issue right? Aren't woman supposed to be equal, earn equal wages, equal respect, 'anything you can do, I can do better' kind of thing? So, why do subliminal and not so subliminal messages like these still exist? You find this type of thing ALL over the world but here in America, we focus on it more. We were once a leading nation on the topic of women equality so as a leader who is trying to set examples for the rest of the world, how can we find this stuff still appropriate?
Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, October 12, 2013 6:14 PM

Commercials don't always try to sell you stuff, they try to appeal to you.  Heroism appeals to people, but people are trying to sell you shirts that advertise comicbooks in a trinity of marketing efforts.  Social appeal, by referring to heros, sales by selling the shirt, and advertising comics.  I like comics, but I would rather spend money on comic books, or go into the world and make a difference and BE a hero (or eat a hero at a hoagie hut) than buy one of those shirts.  My spiritual beliefs are open to allowing the sales of these shirts, but my preference does not incline me to actually purchase one.  I am 'free' in this country to buy or not to buy a shirt.  I'm a long-time supporter of art, and I like the idea the shirt puts forward- supporting heroism and comic books, belief in scifi/fantasy art and concepts, and I agree that someone should buy that shirt... but I feel that I could do more by actually being a hero than telling people to be heros.  By using comic book heros, the advertisers say that nobody on this world is a hero, because they 'aren't real,' but also that anybody can be a hero by striving towards virtue of the pure ideal idols in the comics.

Ana Cristina Gil's curator insight, November 6, 2013 9:15 PM

Companies before they put any product in the market they do research first for example; what people are buying, they take in consideration gender and culture. And why is that? Because they are not going to create a product that no one is going to buy. The impact that this type of messages like this have on a society’s culture. No matter how many laws are make in favor woman equality are created we are being  perceived as the weak sex, that we need the help of a man to do anything. Sadly but true this type of campaign it was sales

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Epic Journeys: Travel in the Footsteps of Alexander the Great

Epic Journeys: Travel in the Footsteps of Alexander the Great | Feminism | Scoop.it

Alexander the Great (or Alexander III of Macedon to use his official title) was born in Macedonia in 356 BC and was educated by the famous philosopher Aristotle. Alexander's ambition was to make Macedonia the powerful nation it once was and so, when he inherited the kingdom in 336 at the age of just 20, he set out to conquer, not just the Persian Empire, but the entire world.

Michele Baker's insight:

Awesome! Never considered this trip before! What an amazing voyage that would be...

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Rescooped by Michele Baker from Geography Education
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Normative Gendered Messages

Normative Gendered Messages | Feminism | Scoop.it

 

Here are two shirts are from the Avengers.  Both are designed for their children apparel production line, but I don't have to tell you which one is marketed for boys and which one is marketed for girls.


Questions to ponder: How (and why) do companies use cultural ideas and values to market their products?  How do companies shape cultural ideas and values?  What impact do messages like this have on a society's culture?  Do seemingly subtle differences is pop cultural products like this matter?  

 

Tags: perspective, culture, gender,  popular culture.


Via Seth Dixon
Michele Baker's insight:

This is a really depressing trend, and one that, as the parent of a daughter, I am all too aware of. It's way past time we start rethinking the way we dictate gender roles in children.

more...
Sabrina Conroy's curator insight, July 15, 2013 11:42 AM
We live in a world where this shouldn't even be an issue right? Aren't woman supposed to be equal, earn equal wages, equal respect, 'anything you can do, I can do better' kind of thing? So, why do subliminal and not so subliminal messages like these still exist? You find this type of thing ALL over the world but here in America, we focus on it more. We were once a leading nation on the topic of women equality so as a leader who is trying to set examples for the rest of the world, how can we find this stuff still appropriate?
Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, October 12, 2013 6:14 PM

Commercials don't always try to sell you stuff, they try to appeal to you.  Heroism appeals to people, but people are trying to sell you shirts that advertise comicbooks in a trinity of marketing efforts.  Social appeal, by referring to heros, sales by selling the shirt, and advertising comics.  I like comics, but I would rather spend money on comic books, or go into the world and make a difference and BE a hero (or eat a hero at a hoagie hut) than buy one of those shirts.  My spiritual beliefs are open to allowing the sales of these shirts, but my preference does not incline me to actually purchase one.  I am 'free' in this country to buy or not to buy a shirt.  I'm a long-time supporter of art, and I like the idea the shirt puts forward- supporting heroism and comic books, belief in scifi/fantasy art and concepts, and I agree that someone should buy that shirt... but I feel that I could do more by actually being a hero than telling people to be heros.  By using comic book heros, the advertisers say that nobody on this world is a hero, because they 'aren't real,' but also that anybody can be a hero by striving towards virtue of the pure ideal idols in the comics.

Ana Cristina Gil's curator insight, November 6, 2013 9:15 PM

Companies before they put any product in the market they do research first for example; what people are buying, they take in consideration gender and culture. And why is that? Because they are not going to create a product that no one is going to buy. The impact that this type of messages like this have on a society’s culture. No matter how many laws are make in favor woman equality are created we are being  perceived as the weak sex, that we need the help of a man to do anything. Sadly but true this type of campaign it was sales

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How To Get Noticed On The Beach This Summer: A Lesson In Confidence

How To Get Noticed On The Beach This Summer: A Lesson In Confidence | Feminism | Scoop.it

However you look, however you dress, whatever your size, shape or gender, feeling good on the inside is the ultimate answer to ensuring you look good on the outside. And there are a few tried and tested tricks to nailing that good feeling. Start practicing these few helpful tips now, and by the time the summer holidays come around, you’ll be feeling the sunshine from the inside out!

 

 

Michele Baker's insight:

This is my latest article, aimed at all, in response to all those "get hot for summer" articles out there. Surely it's about how you're doing on the inside, right?

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