Felts' Fantastic Finds
178 views | +0 today
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Arianne Felts from #HR #RRHH Making love and making personal #branding #leadership
Scoop.it!

Now I’m a Believer - The Power of Beliefs in Leadership

Now I’m a Believer - The Power of Beliefs in Leadership | Felts' Fantastic Finds | Scoop.it
“Live your beliefs and you can turn the world around.” - Henry David Thoreau

 

I ‘m convinced that your thoughts shape your life and your beliefs shape your thoughts. You are where you imagined you would be, even if that isn’t where you thought you’d be. Normally these ideas are discussed in self-help books with a focus on the individual. We are taught to pray, visualize, to affirm and to be intentional in our thoughts so as to create the life of our dreams and/or change our circumstances. Most likely you have seen this power play out in your own life or in the life of others. To some the cause may be a psychological phenomenon and to others a spiritual principle but there is little doubt about the effect. If we are in sync up to this point then please read on.

Recently on a seven hour drive to a business meeting I listened to a series of audio recordings on this subject. I have been reflecting on my life journey quite a bit after an unexpected life transition that put me on a very different path. This new place somehow felt very right even though I didn’t recall seeking it. The more I reflected on the months leading up to this shift, the more I realized I had ended up right where my heart wanted to be.

As I listened, I began to wonder how collective beliefs and thoughts shape organizations…and how leaders impact those thoughts and beliefs.

I can’t say I have fully thought this through but the idea I am interested in discussing with you is that leaders can significantly impact the outcomes of organizations through the beliefs and thoughts they hold and inspire. Another way of expressing this idea would be to say that the collective beliefs about the organization and its mission, and the thoughts attached to those beliefs, are the power source for everything we aspire to achieve and the culture we want to create. Yes, that was a very long sentence but I think it captures the point. If this hypothesis is true at some level then the question we might ask is what beliefs currently exist in our organization and how are they being manifested?

You say you have a vision. Do people see themselves in the picture?

You say you have a mission. Is it worth their life?

You say you have core values. Are they manifested in actions?

You say employees matter. Do they feel loved?

You say put customers first. Do they get it?

 Is reality matching what you say you want? If not, it may have nothing to do with the words you are saying; it’s the fact that no one believes them.

Let’s just take vision as an example. Have you ever actually sat down with your team, asked them to close their eyes and envision what it would be like to be in that desired place? Do they connect with it deeply and feel the joy of that experience even though it hasn’t yet happened? I did this once with a team after we created our core values together. We talked for a while about what they meant and how it would change our relationships and our work. Then I asked them to close their eyes and imagine what it would be like to work in a place where everyone lived those values. After about 10 minutes of visualization I asked everyone to share what they saw and felt. Yeah it was kind of awkward at first but after a while you could feel the positive energy building in the room and everyone left with a clear picture of what we wanted to become.

They visualized it. They believed it. And then it became reality.

In another scenario the opposite happened. Despite pleas from leadership to adopt a new process that would help the organization operate more effectively and make everyone’s lives easier nothing changed. The message was strong, the reasons were clear…but nothing happened. During a discussion about why the effort failed I was struck with the realization that no one believed us. The team held a belief about the organization that was stronger than any words we had to offer.

We had to address the belief in order change reality.

I don’t recall much being said in leadership literature about the power of beliefs so I thought it might be a topic worth discussing. I wrestled with the concept and I still don’t know whether the ideas here made sense to anyone but me. Feel free to weigh in and share your comments to help me frame this more clearly. Maybe you have some great examples you can share or your own ideas about how these forces operate. In the mean time, I’ll keep “thinking” about it.


Via Amy Melendez, Fernanda Grimaldi, Ricard Lloria
more...
Rich Maxwell's curator insight, March 21, 2013 2:37 PM

Do you lead from your vison and values?  Can your direct reports tell you what those values are and what their role in the vision is?  Give it some thought!

Rescooped by Arianne Felts from Into the Driver's Seat
Scoop.it!

What You Need To Know About Self-Directed Learning

What You Need To Know About Self-Directed Learning | Felts' Fantastic Finds | Scoop.it

Via Beth Dichter, Apres, Ken Morrison, Jim Lerman
more...
Victoria Collins's curator insight, May 13, 2013 7:38 AM

What an insightful graphic! So true.

Tracy Hanson's curator insight, May 13, 2013 9:30 AM

It is the foundation of NGGE.

Dr. Steven F. Simmons's curator insight, May 18, 2013 1:16 PM

To thrive in the 21st Century Knolwedge Economy, people must embrace self-directed learning.

Rescooped by Arianne Felts from Business in a Social Media World
Scoop.it!

Infographic: Over half of online teens share personal information with strangers

Infographic: Over half of online teens share personal information with strangers | Felts' Fantastic Finds | Scoop.it
One of the scariest things as a parent is to understand how to prepare my kids for their digital future. It is beyond anything that I experienced growing up.

Via Cendrine Marrouat - cendrinemarrouat.com
more...
Cendrine Marrouat - cendrinemarrouat.com's curator insight, May 14, 2013 4:07 AM

The other day, I was discussing with someone the dangers of using social media without rules. Since Millennials are the only generation that did not have to go through their formative years without a computer, teaching them the basics is now vital.

 

Jim Dougherty shares a great infographic on his blog. It is full of eye-opening stats on Facebook usage. For example, do you know that 55% of teens have given out personal information to someone they don’t know?

Scooped by Arianne Felts
Scoop.it!

Nearly 100 Fantastic Pieces of Journalism

Nearly 100 Fantastic Pieces of Journalism | Felts' Fantastic Finds | Scoop.it
These must-reads are my personal picks for the best nonfiction of 2010
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Arianne Felts from Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks
Scoop.it!

What Should Children Read? | NYTimes Opinion

What Should Children Read? | NYTimes Opinion | Felts' Fantastic Finds | Scoop.it

Malcolm Gladwell, author of “The Tipping Point” and a New Yorker staff writer, told me how he prepared, years ago, to write his first “Talk of the Town” story. “Talk” articles have a distinct style, and he wanted to make sure he got the voice straight in his head before he began writing. His approach was simple. He sat down and read 100 “Talk” pieces, one after the other.

 

The story nicely illustrates how careful reading can advance great writing. As a schoolteacher, I offer Mr. Gladwell’s story to students struggling with expository writing as evidence that they need not labor alone. There are models out there — if only they’ll read them!

 

Mr. Gladwell’s tale provides a good lesson for English teachers across the country as they begin to implement the Common Core State Standards, a set of national benchmarks, adopted by nearly every state, for the skills public school students should master in language arts and mathematics in grades K-12.

 

The standards won’t take effect until 2014, but many public school systems have begun adjusting their curriculums to satisfy the new mandates. Depending on your point of view, the now contentious guidelines prescribe a healthy — or lethal — dose of nonfiction.

 

Click headline to read more and access hot link--


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Arianne Felts from Study information!
Scoop.it!

Malcolm Gladwell

http://www.ted.com Tipping Point author Malcolm Gladwell gets inside the food industry's pursuit of the perfect spaghetti sauce -- and makes a larger argumen...

Via Heion Proj
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Arianne Felts from Digital Delights - Digital Tribes
Scoop.it!

What to Look for in a Classroom by Alfie Kohn

What to Look for in a Classroom by Alfie Kohn | Felts' Fantastic Finds | Scoop.it
A checklist of essential things which you need to look for in a classroom and around the school from furniture setup to teacher and student behavior.

...


Via Ana Cristina Pratas
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Arianne Felts from Teaching + Learning + Policy
Scoop.it!

Debunking the Persistent Myth of Failing U.S. Schools

Debunking the Persistent Myth of Failing U.S. Schools | Felts' Fantastic Finds | Scoop.it

"Beliefs that are debatable or even patently false may be repeated so often that at some point they come to be accepted as fact.  We seem to have crossed that threshold with the claim that U.S. schools are significantly worse than those in most other countries.  Sometimes the person who parrots this line will even insert a number -- 'We’re only ____th in the world,  you know!' -- although, not surprisingly, the number changes with each retelling. A dedicated group of education experts has been challenging this canard for years, but their writings rarely appear in popular publications, and each of their efforts at debunking typically focuses on just one of the many problems with the claim.  Here, then, is the big picture:  a concise overview of the multiple responses you might offer the next time someone declares that American kids come up short." | by Alfie Kohn


Via Todd Reimer
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Arianne Felts from Socratic Seminar
Scoop.it!

Prep School: Talking Trash

Prep School: Talking Trash | Felts' Fantastic Finds | Scoop.it
College has been a heavenly vacation from the bleak reality that Exeter introduced me to.

Via Charles Fischer
more...
Charles Fischer's curator insight, May 4, 2013 10:24 PM

The lackluster and thoughtless exchange in a class conversation is often the result of asking questions that are not text-based. The cause is often a poorly chosen text or poorly phrased questions. Teachers must focus on asking interpretive questions rather than evaluative questions.

Scooped by Arianne Felts
Scoop.it!

In the Margins of the Digital Age: Thoughts on Immersive Reading

In the Margins of the Digital Age: Thoughts on Immersive Reading | Felts' Fantastic Finds | Scoop.it
Today I begin an ongoing series called The Digital Margins. In the first part, I explore marginalia's role in social media. “Digital technology, rather than destroying the tradition of marginalia, ...
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Arianne Felts from Common Core Online
Scoop.it!

Socratic Seminar: Supporting Claims and Counterclaims

Socratic Seminar: Supporting Claims and Counterclaims | Felts' Fantastic Finds | Scoop.it

Using Socratic Seminars in the classroom is an effective teaching strategy to increase student engagement and individual participation. Learn how one high school English literature teacher gets students involved using a Socratic Seminar.


Via Darren Burris
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Arianne Felts from Ladies Making Comics
Scoop.it!

Preview: Dance Class, vol. 4: A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to Paris — Good Comics for Kids

Preview: Dance Class, vol. 4: A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to Paris — Good Comics for Kids | Felts' Fantastic Finds | Scoop.it

Let’s kick off our Tuesday with a preview of Dance Class vol. 4: A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to Paris. You don’t have to have read the earlier volumes to get the idea: It’s a lively slice-of-life story about three friends who are in dance class together. In this volume, they are training for the National Ballet Competition in Paris (the books are translated from the French) and will have to face various obstacles, including a Mean Girl, on their way. Enjoy!


Via Ladies Making Comics
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Arianne Felts from All About Coaching
Scoop.it!

Henry David Thoreau on Defining Your Own Success

Henry David Thoreau on Defining Your Own Success | Felts' Fantastic Finds | Scoop.it

Henry David Thoreau remains best-known for one of history’s most important texts on protest and for Walden, his beautiful 1854 paean to solitude, simplicity, and self-sufficiency. The book synthesizes Thoreau’s insights derived over the two years he spent in a cabin by Walden Pond, woven of exquisite language full of magnificent metaphors and whimsical descriptions, and spanning everything from the nature of the self to consumer culture.
My favorite part, however, deals with a familiar subject — how to define your own success, find your purpose and do what you love...


Via Ariana Amorim
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Arianne Felts from Into the Driver's Seat
Scoop.it!

What You Need To Know About Self-Directed Learning

What You Need To Know About Self-Directed Learning | Felts' Fantastic Finds | Scoop.it

Via Beth Dichter, Apres, Ken Morrison, Jim Lerman
more...
Victoria Collins's curator insight, May 13, 2013 7:38 AM

What an insightful graphic! So true.

Tracy Hanson's curator insight, May 13, 2013 9:30 AM

It is the foundation of NGGE.

Dr. Steven F. Simmons's curator insight, May 18, 2013 1:16 PM

To thrive in the 21st Century Knolwedge Economy, people must embrace self-directed learning.

Rescooped by Arianne Felts from Into the Driver's Seat
Scoop.it!

How to Turn an Urban School District Around—Without Cheating | The Atlantic

How to Turn an Urban School District Around—Without Cheating | The Atlantic | Felts' Fantastic Finds | Scoop.it

By Greg Anrig

Summary by Carnegie Perspectives

 

"The Cincinnati school district has improved both test scores and graduation rates since 2003 while -- unlike Atlanta and Washington -- transparently pursuing highly collaborative reform strategies that, counter to the current trend, don't rely on rigid hierarchy and punitive accountability. Because Cincinnati has implemented proven instructional approaches while nurturing a culture in which administrators, teachers, parents, and community groups closely communicate and work together as teams, the case serves as an important counterweight to the public school stories that have been dominating the news in the past few years. It also can serve as a roadmap for reversing course from the high-pressure tactics that gave rise to the cheating scandals and led to little progress elsewhere."


Via Jim Lerman
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Arianne Felts
Scoop.it!

The Daily Beast

The Daily Beast | Felts' Fantastic Finds | Scoop.it
A smart, speedy take on the news from around the world, combined with the depth and investigative power of Newsweek Magazine.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Arianne Felts
Scoop.it!

Longform

Longform | Felts' Fantastic Finds | Scoop.it
Longform.org posts great new and classic non-fiction articles, curated from across the web.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Arianne Felts from 21st Century skills of critical and creative thinking
Scoop.it!

Malcolm Gladwell: Who Needs Google?

http://bigthink.com Malcolm Gladwell pours cold water on the promises of search technology, suggesting that new technologies are solving problems that don't ...

Via Lynnette Van Dyke
more...
Lynnette Van Dyke's curator insight, March 25, 2013 3:23 PM

Information overload is not the problem...highlights the importance of access to research.

Rescooped by Arianne Felts from Digital Delights
Scoop.it!

Confusing Harder With Better by Alfie Kohn

articles by alfie kohn...

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Arianne Felts from Headlines for School Leaders
Scoop.it!

Sergiovanni a visionary who changed schools

Sergiovanni a visionary who changed schools | Felts' Fantastic Finds | Scoop.it
“He was so visionary about what schools could be and the roles schools could play in our world,” said Shari Albright, chairwoman of Trinity's education department, who as a Trinity graduate student was on the interview team for Sergiovanni when he...

Via Bob Farrace
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Arianne Felts from Thinking Common Core
Scoop.it!

Socratic Seminar: The "N-Word"

Socratic Seminar: The "N-Word" | Felts' Fantastic Finds | Scoop.it
Teaching the N Word is a delicate subject for teachers. Watch how one class uses Socratic Seminar to engage students in a lesson surrounding the N Word. This lesson covers different CCSS reading, speaking and listening goals.

Via Catherine Schmidt
more...
Catherine Schmidt's curator insight, March 25, 2013 9:53 AM

This is a must watch for thinking aboua teaching speaking and listening!

Rescooped by Arianne Felts from Socratic Seminar
Scoop.it!

How to Help Other People Change Their Habits — PsyBlog

How to Help Other People Change Their Habits — PsyBlog | Felts' Fantastic Finds | Scoop.it
Three pointers on helping someone else change their habits.

Via Charles Fischer
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Arianne Felts from iPads & Classroms
Scoop.it!

Technology in the Classroom: The Good and Bad - Huffington Post (blog)

Technology in the Classroom: The Good and Bad - Huffington Post (blog) | Felts' Fantastic Finds | Scoop.it
Technology in the Classroom: The Good and Bad
Huffington Post (blog)
Another student, Lindsey, remarks that the spider looks like the tap-dancing arachnid in Toca Band, the musical app the students play with on one of the classroom's three iPads.

Via John Parker
more...
No comment yet.