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Fans Flock To See Grumpy Cat And Oskar The Blind Cat In Manhattan - CBS New York

Fans Flock To See Grumpy Cat And Oskar The Blind Cat In Manhattan - CBS New York | Feline Health and News - manhattancats.com | Scoop.it
The world’s most famous feline was back in the Big Apple today, and it was awful.
Dr. Arnold Plotnick's insight:

Grumpy Cat and Oskar the Blind Cat are hanging out in Bleeker Street Records Today

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Cat Man Do | Dr. Arnold Plotnick: 5 Facts About FIV

Cat Man Do | Dr. Arnold Plotnick: 5 Facts About FIV | Feline Health and News - manhattancats.com | Scoop.it

5 Facts About FIV

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Cat Man Do | Dr. Arnold Plotnick: Women in veterinary medicine

Cat Man Do | Dr. Arnold Plotnick: Women in veterinary medicine | Feline Health and News - manhattancats.com | Scoop.it

I was reading a DVM magazine today.  There was an articleabout the number of veterinarians that were set to graduate in 2012.  According to the article, there were 2524 new veterinary graduates in 2012, which is a 2% increase from 2011.  They broke down the number of graduates by school, listing the size of the graduating classes of all U.S. veterinary schools.  The chart in the article also divided each school’s class size by gender, and that’s the part that really caught my eye.  There were 82 students in my veterinary class at the University of Florida, in 1988.  The class was divided exactly 50-50 in terms of gender:  41 males and 41 females.  I looked at the makeup of University of Florida’s graduating class for 2012, and was surprised to see that the class was now 71% women and 29% men.  The numbers for all of the schools combined are even more striking:  78% women, 22% men!  Auburn University in Alabama had the highest percentage of men, although this fell well short of 50%.  (It was 40%)  Tufts University, in Massachusetts, had the biggest dichotomy: 88% women, 12% men!   As far as the total number of veterinarians in the entire country, women took the lead in 2009, with there being 44,802 women vets compared with 43196 men.

 

Why has the veterinary profession shifted so dramatically from a male-dominated field to one where women are now taking the lead?

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Cats recognise their owners' voices but never evolved to care, says study

Cats recognise their owners' voices but never evolved to care, says study | Feline Health and News - manhattancats.com | Scoop.it
Any cat owner will tell you that although they are sometimes kept as pets, felines are beholden to no one.
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Cat Man Do | Dr. Arnold Plotnick: Bartonella Shmartonella (Cat Scratch)

Cat Man Do | Dr. Arnold Plotnick: Bartonella Shmartonella (Cat Scratch) | Feline Health and News - manhattancats.com | Scoop.it

Bartonella Shmartonella

The other day, a client of mine called in a bit of a panic. Recently, a stray cat appeared on the doorstep of his upstate vacation home, and even though he wasn’t intending on adding another cat to his single-cat household, this cat was pretty irresistible. A neutered male cat, declawed in front, no identification, and very friendly. Given that someone had obviously owned this cat (or possibly still did), my client took the cat to the local shelter so that he could be checked for a microchip. The verdict: no chip. Still, visions of a distraught family pining for their lost cat danced in his head, and he put up posters in the neighborhood and asked the shelter to hang on to the cat for a few days while a potential owner was sought. After 10 days, with no one claiming the big orange fella, my client was given the green light to adopt him.

The sweet kitty, now christened Opie, was taken to a local vet for examination. The local vet ran a FeLV and FIV test, which thankfully came back negative. The cat was given his first FVRCP vaccine, and a rabies vaccine.

So why the panic? Or should I say unnecessary panic? Because the vet, for some crazy reason, ran a Bartonella test, and this came back positive. The local vet recommended four weeks of “intensive” antibiotic therapy, and warned my client of some potential “consequences” of Bartonella.

By now, most cat owners have heard something about Bartonella. But there’s a lot of misinformation out there, so I hope to set the record straight with this blog post.

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