Feeding your Little Ones
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Early influences on child satiety-responsiveness: the role of weaning style - Brown - 2013 - Pediatric Obesity - Wiley Online Library

Early influences on child satiety-responsiveness: the role of weaning style - Brown - 2013 - Pediatric Obesity - Wiley Online Library | Feeding your Little Ones | Scoop.it

"Infants weaned using a baby-led approach were significantly more satiety-responsive and less likely to be overweight compared with those weaned using a standard approach. This was independent of breastfeeding duration, timing of introduction to complementary foods and maternal control."

Camille Freeman's insight:

Still more support for a baby-led weaning approach to introducing solids

 

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Timing of infant feeding in relation to - PubMed Mobile

Camille Freeman's insight:

This research suggests that introducing wheat, rye, oats & barley (BROW; gluten-containing grains), fish and eggs between 5 - 5.5 months is associated with a decreased risk of asthma & allergic rhinitis (altough introducing other cereals at < 4.5 months increased the risk). 

 

If breastfeeding duration was < 9.5 months, risk of nonatopic asthma was increased (exclusive or not wasn't a big factor). 

 

N=3781 consecutively born children

 

sad note: median duration of exclusive breastfeeding in this population was 1.4 months :(

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Breastfeeding, introduction of other foods and... [Food Nutr Res. 2013] - PubMed - NCBI

Breastfeeding, introduction of other foods and... [Food Nutr Res. 2013] - PubMed - NCBI | Feeding your Little Ones | Scoop.it

The present systematic literature review is part of the 5th revision of the Nordic Nutrition Recommendations. The overall aim was to review recent scientific data valid in a Nordic setting on the short- and long-term health effects of breastfeeding (duration of both any and exclusive breastfeeding) and introduction of foods other than breast milk. The initial literature search resulted in 2,011 abstracts; 416 identified as potentially relevant. Full paper review resulted in 60 quality assessed papers (6A, 48B, and 6C). A complementary search found some additional papers. The grade of evidence was classified as convincing, probable, limited-suggestive, and limited-no conclusion. The evidence was convincing of a protective dose/duration effect of breastfeeding against overweight and obesity in childhood and adolescence, overall infections, acute otitis media, and gastrointestinal and respiratory tract infections. The evidence was probable that exclusive breastfeeding for longer than 4 months is associated with slower weight gain during the second half of the first year which could be part of the reason behind the reduced risk of later overweight or obesity. There was also probable evidence that breastfeeding is a protective factor against inflammatory bowel disease, celiac disease, and diabetes (type 1 and 2), provides beneficial effects on IQ and developmental scores of children as well as a small reductive effect on blood pressure and blood cholesterol levels in adulthood. Other associations explored were limited-suggestive or inconclusive. In conclusion, convincing and probable evidence was found for benefits of breastfeeding on several outcomes. The recommendation in NNR2004 about exclusive breastfeeding for 6 months and continued partial breastfeeding thereafter can stand unchanged. The relatively low proportion of infants in the Nordic countries following this recommendation indicates that strategies that protect, support and promote breastfeeding should be enhanced, and should also recognize the benefits for long-term health.

Camille Freeman's insight:

2013 systematic lit review recommends exclusive breastfeeding for 6  months, partial bf thereafter

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