Feeding the world's people
280 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Alana Evans from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

50 Percent of Food is Wasted-SIWI

50 Percent of Food is Wasted-SIWI | Feeding the world's people | Scoop.it
The Stockholm International Water Institute (SIWI) is a policy institute that seeks sustainable solutions to the world¡¯s escalating water crisis.

 

This is an excellent bit of information to keep in mind when discussing agricultural systems and methods of food production.  Why does this happen? How can we reduce that our waste? 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Roland Trudeau Jr.'s comment, July 23, 2012 10:59 AM
I could only assume that we could come up with better processes of distributing food. Food lost in the field is inevitable to some extent, but there are many ways we could save some just by being more careful. It's understandable that we have a great need for food with 7 billion people on the planet, but that doesn't mean we should expedite things as far as to waste 50% of it.. Even if we only purchased enough to hold us over to the next grocery trip, rather then more just in case, we could help effect this problem.
Jolyn Chia's curator insight, January 24, 2014 9:22 PM

From this article,i can see that more and more people are wasting food. we should not waste food as some other people in other country have no food to eat, and we should really be grateful for what we have and what others dont. when we are wasting food, we must always remind ourselves that other people are not as fortunate to have food to eat, or they might have food that come from the rubbish chute, they wont get enough nutrition. The food that we wasted will be treated as precious stuff in their eyes. I aslo learn that we can help reducing waste by only ordering the portions we think we can handle, and try not to waste food. 

Rescooped by Alana Evans from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Food, Nutrition and Geography

Peter Menzel's beautiful photography and our Hungry Planet...

 

This video is a fascinating portal into global food systems and how globalization is impacting local foods.  He traveled around the world to see what families eat in a given week, and how much all the food cost and where it can from.  Many wealthy countries exhibit poor nutritional habits (eating food high in fat, sugar and salt) while some in poorer people have a very balanced diet.  This leads him to describe the 'Nutritional Transition.'  Warning before showing in class: there are brief instances of non-sexualized nudity in the video. 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Rescooped by Alana Evans from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

FARM-Africa Cassava project

A short film showing the work of FARM-Africa's Maendeleo Agricultural Technology Fund (MATF) in Uganda. The National Farmers Union (NFU) is working with FARM...

 

The Green Revolution is (belatedly) impacting Africa.  Notice the cultural environment within which agriculture takes place here.   What are the gendered differences in the production of food?  What impact does that have on society?


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Matt Mallinson's comment, November 5, 2012 2:29 PM
Wow not just the men in the video are working this hard, but women and children as well. It makes you think how much we have as Americans and how much we take everything for granted. These African people are tough, they have to do so much more to survive than we do.
Elizabeth Allen's comment, November 7, 2012 10:46 AM
This video helps us to see the innovative ways African farmers use Cassava. Cassava is a market crop that many African people are dependent on. They know in order to achieve an income from the crop they need to market it in different varieties, for example- to turn it in to flour. Cassava is labor intensive crop that can take up to a year to be at it's full potential, but the people, women and children included, know that they need to tend to the crop in every stage to insure its success. With the income from the crop, families are able to send their children to school.