Feeding the world's people
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Rescooped by Alana Evans from Geography Education
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West Africa: Slavery in the Chocolate Industry

Although slavery is no longer legal there are still millions of people living in slavery today. One place and industry where slaves still exist is the cocoa ...

 

The world's leading producer of cocoa is Côte d'Ivoire and dirty secret is that slavery is commonplace on cocoa plantations in West Africa.    Children are smuggled from countries such as Mali, Niger and Burkina Faso and then are placed on remote, isolated plantations.  While statistics are all guesstimates, this video is purporting that 35% of the world's chocolate is produced by slave labor (I've seen higher estimates).  What factors lead to this horrific condition?  How is this a geographic issue?    


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AnthonyAcosta/NoahMata's curator insight, April 8, 2015 1:36 PM

 (Social)

 

Chocolate is a very known thing in first world countries and is not known for what is needed to make it. So in Africa they smuggle children from various places in Africa and force them to labor for cocoa beans and work on plantations. Many young children near there   Teen ages are taken and put through labor for most of there young lives.

Martin Kemp's curator insight, December 17, 2015 3:13 PM

i mainly find it amazing that slavery is still so commonplace in parts of the world. whether it is "illegal" or not is irrelivent in these parts of the world and child labor and slavery is such a dominating force in labor.

8A JonathanS's curator insight, February 16, 7:55 AM
This article and YouTube clip is talking about the child labor and modern slavery going on in West Africa. These regions are mostly used for cocoa bean plantations and harvesting. The guy leading this investigation also interviews people who are in charge of the chocolate making factories and asks them where the cocoa beans come from. Almost everyone answers, "the Ivory Coast" and have no idea what so ever what is actually going on there. They just order the amount of beans needed and have no clue what children have to go through to provide these people what they need. In this documentary they also interview some of the children having to go through this and it's very terrible and wrong. These children get taken away from their homes to work and get tricked that they're getting payed even though they don't get anything for all they do. In this clip I also get to see what the owners of the cocoa bean plantations say about what's going on and all the lies are just so silly and I cant believe what their thinking and why they're doing this.

This article connects a lot to what we've been working with in class. We even saw this movie about cocoa farms spread all over Wast Africa and this movie basically talked about the same things the other movie talked about. I enjoyed this movie a lot. Even though the information given was very sad and heart breaking I learned a lot of new things about the conditions of these slaves and and what they actually have to go through to please their "master" and how sad their lives are. When seeing this movie I just felt so bad and I just feel like I want to help these people so much.  
Rescooped by Alana Evans from Geography Education
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The Geography of Hunger and Food Insecurity

Why are some communities more vulnerable to hunger and famine? There are many reasons, which together add up to food insecurity, the world's no.1 health risk...

 

Excellent summary of the geographic factors that lead to food insecurity and hunger and the main ways NGO's are trying to combat the issues.   This is an incredibly complex problem that, at it's heart, is a geographic issue that can challenge student to synthesize information and make the connections between topics.  


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Lisa Fonseca's comment, December 5, 2011 1:02 AM
This is a incredible clip that does challenge students to synthesize information and make the connections between topics, but it can also help students to realize making a difference at a early age is important. I learned an abundance of facts just from watching, it was informative and intriguing. As I was watching the video I was thinking of ways it can be incorporated into the classroom. This video could get students to learn about the world's number one health risk. Incorporating it into the classroom by holding a food drive, or having a school wide fundraiser to donate to the British Red Cross is also another way to help. Getting our future minds informed and helping the community will make an impact in the future.
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Percentage of Population Living in Poverty

Percentage of Population Living in Poverty | Feeding the world's people | Scoop.it

This interactive map shows national estimates of the percentage of the population falling below the poverty line.  That is a quite problematic situation to map, since the operational definitions of poverty vary considerably among countries.  Also, there are some counties without data (Central Africa, North Korea, etc.)  However, there is still considerable value to be gleaned from this map.  What regional patterns do you notice?  How will this map inform our understanding of migration patterns and political unrest?


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Ishwer Singh's curator insight, January 20, 2014 7:26 AM

This map show that most countries in Africa and south America are suffering from poverty. The country suffering from the highest amount of poverty is Chad. it has 80% of its people in poverty and countries around Chad also experience high amounts of poverty. Many articles state that the government there is corrupted. i too believe that the government is corrupted. i hope that the government helps the people and not themselves. People are dying every minute in areas like this due to famine. there are many children who are left to fend for themselves and are abandoned at the very young age as their families couldnt afford to fill another mouth. i believe all this can end if the government does something for the people. 

Edelin Espino's curator insight, December 5, 2014 11:10 AM

I hope the economy get better in the next decades, specially in Latin America. We need more young people we money to spend there. That will open more opportunities for business all over the world.