Self-healthcare & Preventing Chronic Disease Concierge
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Self-healthcare &  Preventing Chronic Disease Concierge
This content is about how we can use self-care methods (which include credible "home remedies," feedback loops, preventive medicine and mobile health to avoid the out-of-pocket expenses (hundreds, if not thousands of dollars) due to  "obamacare" high-deductible insurance policies.
Curated by Kel Mohror
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Self-healthcare & Preventing Chronic Disease Table of Contents

Learning self-healthcare methods and practicing them is the path to countering high health insurance deductibles. Feedback loops in mobile apps, for example, are the key functionality in enabling patients, family members and caregivers to make healthy behavior changes (such as self-care) to prevent or better manage chronic diseases.

 

Self-care actions include, but are *not limited* to

--living life.according to God's Word

--eating balanced, nutritious meals
--walking 10,000 steps and getting other exercise every day
--getting enough sleep every night and
--using online credible consumer health information to limit trips to clinics and hospitals.

 

Diabetes, heart disease, obesity, high blood pressure / stroke and cancer are among the "Priority Conditions" that will be tackled herein.

Kel Mohror's insight:

--What you eat can fuel or cool inflammation

--[Arterial] Inflammation Testing

--Astaxanthin: Still red hot or cooling off?

--Preventive Care Recommendations Tool

--National Diabetes Education Program Step 1: Learn About Diabetes

--Why Feedback Loops Drive Behavior Change

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What you eat can fuel or cool inflammation, a key driver of heart disease, diabetes, and other chronic conditions

What you eat can fuel or cool inflammation, a key driver of heart disease, diabetes, and other chronic conditions | Self-healthcare &  Preventing Chronic Disease Concierge | Scoop.it

Inflammation is an essential part of the body's healing system. Without it, injuries would fester and simple infections could be deadly. Too much of a good thing, though, is downright dangerous.

Kel Mohror's insight:

--Inflammation doesn't happen on its own; it is the body's response to a host of modern irritations like

 

  --smoking

  --lack of exercise

  --high-fat and high-calorie meals and

  --highly processed foods.

 

--Inflammation

 

  --defends our body against bacteria, viruses, and other foreign invaders

 

  -- removes debris, and

 

  --helps repair damaged tissue.

 

--Inside arteries, inflammation helps kick off atherosclerosis and keeps the process smoldering. It even influences the formation of artery-blocking clots, the ultimate cause of heart attacks and many strokes.

 

What we can do to reduce inflammation

 

--Swap saturated and trans fats  for olive oil, which has potent anti-inflammatory properties, or polyunsaturated fats, especially omega-3 fats from fish.

 

--Eat whole-grain bread, brown rice, and other whole grains smooths out the after-meal rise in blood sugar and insulin, and dampens cytokine [inflammatory messenger] production.

 

--The more fruits and vegetables we eat, the lower the burden of inflammation.

 

[Concludes with four additional food recommendations.]

 

--If you adopt an anti-inflammatory diet, you probably won't see or feel any different. Angina won't suddenly disappear or heart failure reverse itself.

 

  --Mediterranean diet

  --Healthy Eating Pyramid

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Astaxanthin: Still red hot or cooling off? The Dr Oz effect… two years on

Astaxanthin: Still red hot or cooling off? The Dr Oz effect… two years on | Self-healthcare &  Preventing Chronic Disease Concierge | Scoop.it
Rewind two years, and astaxanthin was the hottest nutraceutical in town, with sales “skyrocketing” following a slot on Dr Oz in which Dr Joseph Mercola described the potent red antioxidant as the “number one supplement you’ve never heard of that you should be taking”.
Kel Mohror's insight:

Astaxanthin is a "nutriceutical" (nutritional supplement) that may reduce inflammation, including systemic (low-grade) inflammation.

 

As always, do your homework before adding any supplement to your diet.

 

On Jan 7, 2011 - Astaxanthin has been affirmed GRAS [generally recognized as safe] for use in functional food and beverage applications.

 

Astaxanthin may have postive effects on

--cardiovascular health

--joint and tendon health and

--recovering from intense athletic activities.

 

--Astaxanthin is a fat-soluable nutrient derived from the Haematococcus pluvialis, a freshwater species of cyanoalgae

 

--commercial production is difficult type of "aquafarming"

 

--more than 20 positive effects on health are described in an article at

 http://preventdisease.com/news/08/050708_astaxanthin.shtml

 

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Learn About Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes | NDEP

Learn About Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes | NDEP | Self-healthcare &  Preventing Chronic Disease Concierge | Scoop.it
Kel Mohror's insight:

The left sidebar on this page has these links

--Step 1: Learn About Diabetes [Scooped here]

--Step 2: Know Your Diabetes ABCs
--Step 3: Manage Your Diabetes
--Step 4: Get Routine Care to Avoid Problems

 

--the three types of diabetes are defined

 

--practicing self-care may help you avoid health problems caused by diabetes such as:

  --heart disease and stroke.
  --eye problems that can lead to trouble seeing or going blind.
  --nerve damage that can cause your hands and feet to feel numb.  (Some people may even lose a foot or a leg.)
  --kidney problems that can cause your kidneys to stop working.
  --gum disease and loss of teeth.

 

--describes your experiences when blood glucose (blood sugar) is close to normal 


--has links to three Publications


--has links to two Resources


--has links to the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK),  the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) and the National Institutes of Health (NIH).

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Inflammation Testing - Cleveland HeartLab, Inc.

Inflammation Testing - Cleveland HeartLab, Inc. | Self-healthcare &  Preventing Chronic Disease Concierge | Scoop.it
Inflammation Testing Cleveland HeartLab offers inflammatory biomarker testing to help practitioners evaluate cardiovascular risk in patients. This group of tests covers a patient’s biomarker profile which may result from lifestyle concerns (F2-IsoPs) to the development of metabolic or cardiovascular disease Learn more
Kel Mohror's insight:

Arterial inflammation is a dangerous condition we can prevent through healthier eating and regular exercise.

 

--inflammatory biomarker testing to help practitioners evaluate cardiovascular risk in patients.


[If the risk is high enough, a patient will want to weigh the pros / cons of

  --changing eating and exercise habits or

  --being saddled with a medication regimen or

  --eventually facing bypass surgery (up to $117,000).


  The first option additionally decreases the patient's risk for stroke and other chronic conditions.]


-- Myeloperoxidase (MPO) is a white blood cell-derived inflammatory enzyme which "marks" disease activity that can be measured.


--MPO activates protease cascades that are linked to plaque vulnerability.


--A combination of detrimental effects demonstrates that MPO is actively involved in the progression of atherosclerosis. 


[The *cause of arterial inflammation and what to do* to prevent it is the Scoop.it post "What you eat can fuel or cool inflammation" in "Self-healthcare & Preventing Chronic Disease."]


It is wise to test


individuals at intermediate or high risk for developing coronary heart disease who


  --are any age with at least two major risk factors


  --those ≥65 years of age with one major risk factor,


    --smokers


    --those with a fasting blood glucose of ≥100 mg/dL or


    --who those have metabolic syndrome.

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Prevent Disease.com - Top 10 Superfoods: Goji Berries, Cinnamon, Turmeric And More

Prevent Disease.com - Top 10 Superfoods: Goji Berries, Cinnamon, Turmeric And More | Self-healthcare &  Preventing Chronic Disease Concierge | Scoop.it

Paraphrasing- "Variety to the eye and for the palate is the spice and sweetener of life."

Kel Mohror's insight:

Although the site owner states "We looked at the studies of 10 pantry picks and give you the real goods about their disease-fighting powers," for one of the "superfoods they comment "there isn't enough evidence yet to confirm the health claims, since we only have testimonials and animal studies to go by."

 

[As always, the key phrase remains "Do your homework" before buying or adopting a new practice.]

 

Each "superfood" [a common-use term in the food industry, not an FDA-cleared designation] has two sections, a

 

--descriptive paragraph and

--dietary uses.

 

Lastly is a link to "More articles on Antioxidants">

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Preventive Care Recommendations Tool

United Healthcare

Kel Mohror's insight:

This UnitedHealthcare site "Preventive Care Guideline Recommendations" has a video and a search tool for finding preventive care guidelines for yourself and your family members according to

--age and gender.

 

Providing those two data points enables the page to create appropriate "Preventive Care Guidelines" that can be printed out or saved as PDFs. The content is organized as

 

--Overview tab

 

--Your Guidelines tab having

 

  --Preventive vs Diagnostic Care

    "What is the difference?"

    "Why does it matter?"

    A table listing"Screenings," "Immunizations" and "Counceling" 

 

--(Gender) in Their (Age) tab

Offers additional "Additional Preventive Care Health Information" 

 

--Checklist tab

Preventive care visit

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Why Feedback Loops Are Key to Driving Behavior Change

Why Feedback Loops Are Key to Driving Behavior Change | Self-healthcare &  Preventing Chronic Disease Concierge | Scoop.it
Consider this scenario: You flip through your usual stack of mail and notice a home energy report provided by your energy company. As you open it, you expect to
Kel Mohror's insight:

--Peer pressure – in a good way

 

--Feedback loops and population health management

 

--more important for individuals to have the information they need to make informed decisions about their healthcare 

 

–-encourage them to use that information to make good choices

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