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Feed the Writer
Inspiration for writers
Curated by Sarah McElrath
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What Type of Thinker Are You?

What Type of Thinker Are You? | Feed the Writer | Scoop.it
When we get stuck in convergent thinking, we miss the possibilities open to us.

Via MyCreativeTeam
Sarah McElrath's insight:

Helpful info. not only to writers/artists, but to all.

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Write for Dummies.com - For Dummies

Because consumers look to Dummies.com for answers on nearly every part of their life, we're looking for expert authors on all kinds of topics — from iPhones to investing. If you're a topic expert with excellent writing skills and would like to contribute articles to Dummies.com, please complete the form below. We'll review your credentials and writing sample. If there's a match, we'll contact you. Unfortunately, we can't send feedback to everyone, so only the authors that we think are the best match for Dummies.com will be contacted.

 

Your writing sample submission is subject to the terms of conditions of use of the site. Click here to review our terms and conditions.

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Rescooped by Sarah McElrath from The Funnily Enough
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When To State The Obvious In A Story

When To State The Obvious In A Story | Feed the Writer | Scoop.it

Not only is it difficult to know how much information to give readers so they know what’s going on, it’s also tricky knowing when to give it to them.

There are many ways to do it right, but there are two very specific ways to do it wrong.

One is signposting, where you say up front what’s about to happen, and then it happens. You end up stealing your own thunder.

The other is burying the lead, where you put off mentioning the elephant in the room, so that when you do eventually bring it up not only is everyone taken by surprise, but now it appears to be a teleporting elephant.


Via mooderino
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The Stories We Tell Others | Sarah McElrath's World Walkings

The Stories We Tell Others | Sarah McElrath's World Walkings | Feed the Writer | Scoop.it

In a way, the stories we tell others are a form of world-building. We include details that fit within the parameters of the world we wish to create. We ignore the ones that don’t.

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Why we have our best ideas in the shower: The science of creativity - The Buffer blog: productivity, life hacks, writing, user experience, customer happiness and business.

Why we have our best ideas in the shower: The science of creativity - The Buffer blog: productivity, life hacks, writing, user experience, customer happiness and business. | Feed the Writer | Scoop.it
It's a long term, unwritten rule: We get our best ideas in the shower. Why does this happen? Here is an exploration of the science of creativity:

Via stan stewart
Sarah McElrath's insight:

I get it. Keep the monkey in your mind busy with some routine task and the more creative part of your mind can then step forth.

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stan stewart's comment, March 4, 2013 5:50 AM
Thanks for the re-scoops!
Dário Viegas's comment, March 4, 2013 6:44 AM
Thank you for the amazing content!
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Yes, You Can Teach and Assess Creativity!

Yes, You Can Teach and Assess Creativity! | Feed the Writer | Scoop.it

A recent blog by Grant Wiggins affirmed what I have long believed about creativity: it is a 21st-century skill we can teach and assess. Creativity fosters deeper learning, builds confidence...


Via Peter Shanks
Sarah McElrath's insight:

Interesting post. Looks at what creativity is--looks like--and then how to assess it.

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The Perfectly Balanced Story

The Perfectly Balanced Story | Feed the Writer | Scoop.it

When you tell someone a story in person, you probably know the person you’re talking to. You will at least have a rough idea of how familiar they are with the people and places you’re referring to. And if you misjudge, they can always ask you questions. 

 

In fiction, it’s much harder to know exactly how much information a reader needs or wants. And even if you did, it would be impossible to provide since you’ll have more than one reader, and each will have different requirements. 

 

You can’t get the balance right, because there is no way to please everyone. 

 

However, that doesn’t mean you can’t get it wrong. You may not be able to please all the people all the time, but you can certainly piss them all off.


Via mooderino
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CristinaSkyBox: Release Your Inhibitions - Writing Resources

CristinaSkyBox: Release Your Inhibitions - Writing Resources | Feed the Writer | Scoop.it

No matter how techie our lives have become, good writing is still a requirement to succeed at school and professionally. Good writing helps see in the world from a different angle, may be cathartic and most of all, good writing may be a pleasure. 

Sarah McElrath's insight:

Lots of good links here.

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The 26 Major Advantages to Reading More Books and Why 3 in 4 People Are Being Shut Out of Success

The 26 Major Advantages to Reading More Books and Why 3 in 4 People Are Being Shut Out of Success | Feed the Writer | Scoop.it
I read a Associated Press-Ipsos poll revealing that 1 in 4 adults read no books last year. Yes, that’s 25% of the adults out there are reading zero books. This is sad.
Sarah McElrath's insight:

Just want to point out that books can mean e-books. The format doesn't matter--the content does.

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In Your Corner: The many benefits of reading

In Your Corner: The many benefits of reading | Feed the Writer | Scoop.it
Reading is good for us. There is just no denying it; 901 million hits came up when I Googled it. I’ve searched through them, and will give you the best
Sarah McElrath's insight:

#7. Improves creativity. Yes. Definitely.

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8 Major Benefits of Reading

8 Major Benefits of Reading | Feed the Writer | Scoop.it
Find 8 ways that you can benefits from reading books every day.
Sarah McElrath's insight:

In honor of March is Reading Month....

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The Lies We Tell Ourselves | Sarah McElrath's World Walkings

The Lies We Tell Ourselves | Sarah McElrath's World Walkings | Feed the Writer | Scoop.it

One of the things that fascinates me the most about being hardwired for STORY, is the stories we tell ourselves. How much of those stories are true, and how much are lies? And are we even aware when we lie to ourselves?


A look at inner stories and how a writer can use the inner stories of characters to further plot.

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One Hundred Famous Rejections

One Hundred Famous Rejections | Feed the Writer | Scoop.it

Via Judith van Praag
Sarah McElrath's insight:

It does give one hope.

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Judith van Praag's curator insight, February 26, 2013 2:46 PM

Take heart, some famous authors went ahead of you, and ahead sending in their manuscripts no matter what.

This said, it pays off to read a couple of issues of a publication you are submitting to, and stick to guidelines.

Format your manuscripts exactly the way the publication, editor, or agent requests.

Sans serif font, double space, 1-inch all around, no fancy paper, no staples, no triple holes or perhaps yes triple holes.
For some recipients of screenplays the brass pin you push through the top hole is the only thing they consider valuable, unless the first lines really catch their attention.
Misspelled the name of the editor or show stupid typos on the front page? That means your precious manuscript will be gone with the wind, or rather dumped in the recylce bin.

Take heart, take care and good luck!

Rescooped by Sarah McElrath from Write On!
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Pixar's 22 Rules of Storytelling

Pixar's 22 Rules of Storytelling | Feed the Writer | Scoop.it
These rules were originally tweeted by Emma Coats, Pixar's Story Artist. Number 9 on the list - When you’re stuck, make a list of what wouldn't happen next - is a great one and can apply to writers...

Via Judith van Praag
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Judith van Praag's curator insight, March 12, 2013 4:38 AM

This is a gold mine. Have a coffee, or a tea, or what ever suits your fancy and take in these story telling rules. Apply them right away, where possible, and then file them for future  reference, or come back here. I've scooped them for just that reason.

Rescooped by Sarah McElrath from Writing Activities for Kids
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Newspaper Template, Microsoft Word Newspaper Templates for Kids, Free & Students

Newspaper Template, Microsoft Word Newspaper Templates for Kids, Free & Students | Feed the Writer | Scoop.it
The #1 place for free Microsoft word newspaper templates for kids, students that are printable and blank.

Via Ana Cristina Pratas, BookChook
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BookChook's curator insight, March 8, 2013 5:42 PM

New templates for kids to create own newspapers. 

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Stolen Moments: 10 Ways to Steal Writing Time

Stolen Moments:  10 Ways to Steal Writing Time | Feed the Writer | Scoop.it
Writers are given 8,736 hours a year to write. Making the most out of writing time requires flexibility, determination, ingenuity and grit.

Via Elaine J Roberts, Ph.D.
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Elaine J Roberts, Ph.D.'s curator insight, March 11, 2013 12:07 AM

Some interesting notes/insights, and I'd like to point out the reference to "duck tape." For those of you who think the writer might be incorrect, hold on to your judgmental selves. The truly first was, in fact, "duck tape" using cotton duck cloth, a heavy cotton fabric. And Duck Tape is a brand name of all kinds of stuff to keep stuff together or just plain ol' decorate. http://duckbrand.com/

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The Bookshelf Muse

The Bookshelf Muse | Feed the Writer | Scoop.it
A blog to help writers and teachers become stronger writers, with a deep focus on writing tools and description.
Sarah McElrath's insight:

Love this website. Great help on how to write descriptively. I bought The Emotion Thesaurus and then had to buy 3 more for my library because so many people wanted to use it. (teachers and students)

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CDC - Blogs - Public Health Matters Blog – Preparedness 101: Zombie Apocalypse

CDC - Blogs - Public Health Matters Blog – Preparedness 101: Zombie Apocalypse | Feed the Writer | Scoop.it
CDC - Blogs - Public Health Matters Blog – Preparedness 101: Zombie Apocalypse - Sharing our stories on preparing for and responding to public health events
Sarah McElrath's insight:

Love that this post gets across some great info. about being prepared for emergency situations in a fun, lighthearted manner.

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Rescooped by Sarah McElrath from Developing Creativity
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Overseeing Our Emotions To Be More Creative – Part 2 - The Creative Mind

Overseeing Our Emotions To Be More Creative – Part 2 - The Creative Mind | Feed the Writer | Scoop.it

"My whole life has been about trying to heal the rift between the two sides of my personality, the feeling too much and the knowing too much."

Jodie Foster

 

Gaining more awareness and control of our feelings can help us live with a higher level of well-being, and be more fully and freely creative.


Via Douglas Eby
Sarah McElrath's insight:

So much of life is about balance. Work vs. Play, Emotion vs. Thought.....

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Rescooped by Sarah McElrath from Write On!
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How to improve editing skills - for copy editors and writers alike

How to improve editing skills - for copy editors and writers alike | Feed the Writer | Scoop.it

Via Judith van Praag
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Judith van Praag's curator insight, March 1, 2013 10:36 AM

Yes! This is by far the best post I've come across with the three pigs (imagine a French accent here) as a topic. To offer "stir" as meaning of pique is helpful, for the closest to the irritation which the onomatopoea (more in French than English) brings forth. "Ça pique!" may be uttered after misplacing key's, suffering a bite of an ant, or better yet, someone else by a fly (as in the saying "Quelle mouche t'a picqué?") in that latte case the expression means what's bugging you?
As for a copy editor imaginative and inquisitive while correcting, a wholehearted Yes! to that as well.

Rescooped by Sarah McElrath from Creativity Scoops!
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10 Ways to Overcome Creativity's No.1 Crusher - PsychCentral.com (blog)

10 Ways to Overcome Creativity's No.1 Crusher - PsychCentral.com (blog) | Feed the Writer | Scoop.it
10 Ways to Overcome Creativity's No.1 Crusher
PsychCentral.com (blog)
10 Ways to Overcome Creativity's No.1 Crusher “The worst enemy of creativity is self-doubt,” wrote Sylvia Plath in her journal. And she couldn't have been more accurate.

Via Creativity For Life
Sarah McElrath's insight:

Love #1. It is the power of the stories we tell ourselves that determine who we become.

 

"1. Remember self-doubt is a story.

As Davidson said, thinking you’re not good at something doesn’t make it true. Her art teacher triggered her self-doubt, but it was the stories spinning in Davidson’s mind that stopped her from creating. And these disempowering tales were clearly distorted."

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Marci Segal, MS's comment, March 7, 2013 8:40 AM
Thanks Doug - a good one.
Lee Wise's curator insight, July 9, 2013 10:15 AM

Some simple, good thoughts here to add a Beautiful Moment in your day... or maybe two?  

Lee Wise's curator insight, October 22, 2013 3:56 PM

Brief.  Inspirational. Insightful.  Enjoy for one or more Beautiful Moments In Time!

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Tapping Your Superconscious: Da Vinci’s Streamwriting technique

Tapping Your Superconscious: Da Vinci’s Streamwriting technique | Feed the Writer | Scoop.it
To spite all the recent talk about Da Vinci’s Code and his possible involvement with the Holy Grail, few would argue Leonardo Da Vinci’s qualities of genius.
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Health Benefits of Reading | Timi Gustafson, R.D.

Health Benefits of Reading | Timi Gustafson, R.D. | Feed the Writer | Scoop.it
Reading has many health benefits, including prevention of memory loss and cognitive decline.
Sarah McElrath's insight:

Love that it talked about how reading can let you get into another character--and can even change behavior because our brain experiences the same as if it happened to us. Great stuff.

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You Are Boring

You Are Boring | Feed the Writer | Scoop.it
Here’s the full text of a piece I wrote for The Magazine a few months ago. I really enjoyed writing it, and would like to thank Marco once again for publishing it there. If you haven’t checked out The...
Sarah McElrath's insight:

Great things to think about when creating dialog.

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Editorially: Write Better

Editorially: Write Better | Feed the Writer | Scoop.it

From the Editorially blog:

 

"It’s with all this in mind that we came together to make Editorially, a new collaborative writing and editing platform. We believe that the web is not merely another distribution pipeline, but a unique and deserving space for both reading and writing. Our goal is to support and encourage that writing process — from the first flash of inspiration all the way through to publication, and at every point in between.

 

"Editorially achieves this goal in many ways: a Markdown-based writing environment lets you focus on the words and create clean markup easily; collaboration tools let you invite friends and trusted colleagues to review or edit your work; a document version system lets you mark points in a document’s history and compare versions to see what changed; notes and activity feeds encourage you to reflect on your work, for yourself and for others; and discussion threads recognize that the conversation around a text is just as important as the text itself.

 

"And we’re only getting started. This is not just another text editor: it’s an ecosystem for the writing process. We’ve designed a space that brings you closer to both the words and the people — the only things that matter."

 

 


Via Jim Lerman
Sarah McElrath's insight:

Could be very useful. Still in closed beta, but you can sign up for a trial or follow on Twitter.

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Jim Lerman's curator insight, February 26, 2013 4:11 PM

This could be a really big deal.

 

Right now, Editorially is still in closed beta, but you can sign up for an invitation. They say they will open up very soon.

Sarah McElrath's comment, February 27, 2013 11:52 AM
Very interesting. With the way education is going, this could have a hugh impact in that sector--but only if it isn't priced too high.