Feed the Writer
1.9K views | +0 today
Follow
Feed the Writer
Inspiration for writers
Curated by Sarah McElrath
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Sarah McElrath from Scriveners' Trappings
Scoop.it!

The Joy Is In the Struggle of Making: How Writers Get Their Ideas ~ Green Mountains Review

The Joy Is In the Struggle of Making: How Writers Get Their Ideas ~ Green Mountains Review | Feed the Writer | Scoop.it

by Aaron Gilbreath

 

"Writers can backtrack and pinpoint the origin of many essays, poems and stories, the moments where we recognized some shape in the ether as the start of something, a particle to split or terrain to explore. This is the proverbial “aha moment” when something clicks. Yet the whole process remains so mysterious that we often end up speaking in hazy clichés such as “something clicked” and “aha moment,” mapping a piece’s genesis on a vague psycho-geography composed of particles and ether, because the process of discovery is often as ambiguous as our understanding of it.

 

"There is consolation, though. The more you write, the more you learn how to generate ideas. Even if you still depend on happenstance, you develop habits. Whether the places you search are on the streets or in books or the caverns of your mind, you learn to recognize the fertile locations where subjects turn up, in the same way an urban hawk learns where the pigeons roost, and you visit those locations frequently. The writer Barry Lopez summarized this tracking ability when he said something to the effect of (I’m paraphrasing from memory): once you train your eyes to see them, you realize that stories are everywhere. That’s true. But how do you learn to see?"


Via Charles Fischer, Jim Lerman
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Sarah McElrath from Cultivating Creativity
Scoop.it!

Seven Steps to Build Your Experimental Capability - The Discipline of Innovation

Seven Steps to Build Your Experimental Capability - The Discipline of Innovation | Feed the Writer | Scoop.it
Experimenting is a core innovation skill. Scott Berkun's book The Year Without Pants outlines the approach that Automattic uses to foster experiments at WordPress.com. It's a great approach, which you can adapt to fit your organisation too.

Via Peter Shanks
more...
Peter Shanks's curator insight, September 19, 2013 9:41 AM

Here are the seven steps that they use at Automattic to build new features for WordPress.com

Rescooped by Sarah McElrath from Creativity & Innovation
Scoop.it!

The Real Neuroscience of Creativity | Beautiful Minds, Scientific American Blog Network

The Real Neuroscience of Creativity | Beautiful Minds, Scientific American Blog Network | Feed the Writer | Scoop.it
So yea, you know how the left brain is really realistic, analytical, practical, organized, and logical, and the right brain is so darn creative, passionate, sensual, tasteful, ...

Via MyCreativeTeam
Sarah McElrath's insight:

Very interesting brain research on creativity.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Sarah McElrath from The Funnily Enough
Scoop.it!

Improving Cause and Effect

Improving Cause and Effect | Feed the Writer | Scoop.it

Every story is a series of events that hopefully lead from one to another. Something happens and because of that other actions need to be taken. 

 

But even when thing logically follow on from one to the next, that doesn’t necessarily make for an interesting story. Just because there’s a good reason for what a character’s doing, that isn’t necessarily enough to make it worth reading about. 

 

You can very easily get into a groove that turns into a rut. What the character needs to do next seems so obvious the writer doesn’t take a moment to consider whether that’s a good thing.


Via mooderino
Sarah McElrath's insight:

Good reminder that when things get too logical and obvious, the reader just might lose interest.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sarah McElrath
Scoop.it!

What Makes a Good Writer

What Makes a Good Writer | Feed the Writer | Scoop.it
Someone who has a flair for worded expression can be a good writer. Someone who doesn't think of writing as a chore can be a good writer. Someone who writes like a natural can be a good writer. So, let us really find out what makes a good writer.
Sarah McElrath's insight:

Good insights--and comfort to both the natural writer and the writer that agonizes over every word.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sarah McElrath
Scoop.it!

WHERE GOOD IDEAS COME FROM by Steven Johnson

One of our most innovative, popular thinkers takes on-in exhilarating style-one of our key questions: Where do good ideas come from? With Where Good Ideas Co...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sarah McElrath
Scoop.it!

Kate Hart: How To Get Published: A Flowchart

Kate Hart: How To Get Published: A Flowchart | Feed the Writer | Scoop.it
Sarah McElrath's insight:

Slightly tongue-in-cheek infographic.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sarah McElrath
Scoop.it!

The 7 Types of Bloggers - Are You Writing from the Right Place? - Technorati

The 7 Types of Bloggers - Are You Writing from the Right Place? - Technorati | Feed the Writer | Scoop.it
Technorati
The 7 Types of Bloggers - Are You Writing from the Right Place?
Technorati
Technorati Top 100 Books blog Write to Done offers up a succinct list of seven different types of bloggers, and the content they tend to connect over.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sarah McElrath
Scoop.it!

Never underestimate the power of the flock | Sarah McElrath's World Walkings

Never underestimate the power of the flock | Sarah McElrath's World Walkings | Feed the Writer | Scoop.it

Struggling to write out there all on your own? Harness the power of others--and get writing.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sarah McElrath
Scoop.it!

Onomatopoeia in conversation

Examples of sound effects and imitative words for noises people make in conversation, as found in poems, literature, slang and the web. Grunts, sniffs, greetings, crying and more
Sarah McElrath's insight:

A lot of communication is in sounds as well as words. Great resource for writers.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sarah McElrath
Scoop.it!

It’s the end of the world as we know it | Sarah McElrath's World Walkings

It’s the end of the world as we know it | Sarah McElrath's World Walkings | Feed the Writer | Scoop.it

Day #2 of Writing Camp. Last night I started the novel in contemporary omniscient, setting the scene, and then delved into single third, in Sera’s head. After getting frustrated (partly because I switched to past tense as well and I’m so used to writing in present), I started a second beginning (See previous post about my insane creative process) with classical omniscient and then into single third, present tense.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Sarah McElrath from Bullish Ink: Write Fiction Right
Scoop.it!

WriterStrong: Keep Them Up All Night Turning Pages

WriterStrong: Keep Them Up All Night Turning Pages | Feed the Writer | Scoop.it

If you’ve been told, either by agents, editors, or crit groups that you have a pacing problem, don’t get overwhelmed. Yes, look at where you enter and exit each scene, but also try this: zoom in to a single plot point or interaction between characters and analyze how you build anticipation.


Via Ruth Long
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Sarah McElrath from Coffee News
Scoop.it!

The Strange Scientific Connection Between Coffee Shops And Creativity

The Strange Scientific Connection Between Coffee Shops And Creativity | Feed the Writer | Scoop.it
Researchers have found that the level of noise that matches the bustle of a coffee shop--around 70 decibels--spurs more creative performance than the...

Via Kawateachoc-Flaavor.com
Sarah McElrath's insight:

So it wasn't just an excuse!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sarah McElrath
Scoop.it!

Home Page - Television Tropes & Idioms

Home Page - Television Tropes & Idioms | Feed the Writer | Scoop.it
Main: Home Page
Sarah McElrath's insight:

Okay, this is way too much fun and therefore a huge procrastination factor in the life of a writer. But did I mention fun?

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sarah McElrath
Scoop.it!

31 Ways to Find Inspiration for Your Writing

31 Ways to Find Inspiration for Your Writing | Feed the Writer | Scoop.it
Every writer needs to find inspiration in order to produce inspired writing. Sometimes inspiration can come from unlikely sources ... (need some inspiration?
Sarah McElrath's insight:

Good list of jumping off points.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Sarah McElrath from Creativity & Innovation
Scoop.it!

What These 7 World-Famous Artists Can Teach You About Creativity

What These 7 World-Famous Artists Can Teach You About Creativity | Feed the Writer | Scoop.it
Feeling uninspired? We've all been there.

Via MyCreativeTeam
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sarah McElrath
Scoop.it!

Let’s write a novel in a month: Part 4—Slow Death | Quirk Books : Publishers & Seekers of All Things Awesome

Let’s write a novel in a month: Part 4—Slow Death | Quirk Books : Publishers & Seekers of All Things Awesome | Feed the Writer | Scoop.it
Sarah McElrath's insight:

So true, alas.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Sarah McElrath from Developing Creativity
Scoop.it!

40 Inspiring Workspaces Of The Famously Creative

40 Inspiring Workspaces Of The Famously Creative | Feed the Writer | Scoop.it
From tiny writing desks to giant painting studios, the only thing all of these creative studios have in common is that they inspired their successful inhabitants to create greatness.

Via Douglas Eby
Sarah McElrath's insight:

Interesting to see the variety. 

more...
Douglas Eby's curator insight, July 27, 2013 4:35 PM

J. K. Rowling wrote much of the first "Harry Potter" in coffee shops. George Orwell chose to write Nineteen Eighty-Four while living in Barnhill (1946-1949), an abandoned farmhouse on the isle of Jura in the Inner Hebrides. - From Solitude is not pathology for the high sensitivity personality http://talentdevelop.com/3558/

Carol Sanford's curator insight, July 28, 2013 11:32 AM

As you scroll through, you cannot help but notice how many look out ont nature. Since I now look at the Olumpic Mountains and the Puget Sounds from my windows, I know why. Nature, even looking at her and lsitening to the birds cry, small the freshness, I am restoried, inspired and guided in what matters most.

There were very few workspaces which were shown cluttered. Fung Shui says that a cluttered room leads to cluttered mind. It does for me I know. These creative people have sparse or orderedly work spaces. 

How beautiful to reflect on why my workspace is so inspiring to me. Have you found yours?

Scooped by Sarah McElrath
Scoop.it!

YA Highway: publishing road map

YA Highway: publishing road map | Feed the Writer | Scoop.it
Sarah McElrath's insight:

Helpful interactive map about reading, writing, and publishing.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Sarah McElrath from Into the Driver's Seat
Scoop.it!

Storytelling Websites and Resources | Elizabeth Figa

Storytelling Websites and Resources | Elizabeth Figa | Feed the Writer | Scoop.it
Resources for storytelling performances, training, coaching, and research.

Via José Carlos, Jim Lerman
Sarah McElrath's insight:

Tons of links on how to tell stories, why we are so interested in stories, and websites with great stories.

more...
Coletta P. Kahn's comment, July 26, 2013 12:13 AM
wow good one!!
Karen Dietz's comment, July 30, 2013 8:50 PM
Thanks Coletta!
Rescooped by Sarah McElrath from Transmedia: Storytelling for the Digital Age
Scoop.it!

SEVEN STEPS TO THE PERFECT STORY [Fun Infographic]

SEVEN STEPS TO THE PERFECT STORY [Fun Infographic] | Feed the Writer | Scoop.it

Via The Digital Rocking Chair
more...
Mary Westcott's curator insight, March 1, 2016 10:14 AM

Maybe a tad too complex for our young students, but still a nice way of understanding the foundations of storytelling!!

Marisa d's curator insight, March 11, 2016 12:22 AM

Maybe a tad too complex for our young students, but still a nice way of understanding the foundations of storytelling!!

Salena Argar's curator insight, May 17, 6:31 AM
Seven steps to the perfect story is a great visual representation of how to build a story. This clearly explains the process of how students can construct their narrative and the types of characters they will use. I would definitely use this in my classroom to help students understand the process of creating a narrative.
Rescooped by Sarah McElrath from Writing Rightly
Scoop.it!

Resources for Writers: Tips for Writing Effective Dialogue

Resources for Writers: Tips for Writing Effective Dialogue | Feed the Writer | Scoop.it

Via Penelope
more...
Penelope's curator insight, May 21, 2013 12:15 AM

 

Yackety Yak. Blah Blah Blah. We talk every day and in every way. Is it always effective talking? Not really. But when it comes to our writing of dialogue inside of our stories, it better be.

 

When a writer goes on for a page or two or three describing what kind of coffee a character is going to order at the cafe, my eyes start to roll back in my head, and I am more than likely to slam the door on that story.

 

Dialogue is war! If you write dialogue--make it tight--and make it right! Make sure it is going to advance your story. I am still basking in the "afterglow" of all of the wonderful dialogue and storytelling from the remake of the "Great Gatsby" movie. Ah, but that is a post for another day.

 

***This review was written by Penelope Silvers for her curated content on "Writing Rightly"***

 

Link to the original article: http://jodierennerediting.blogspot.com/2010/08/tips-for-writing-effective-dialogue.html

 

 

Jacques Goyette's curator insight, May 21, 2013 3:13 PM

very instructive advice. De bons conseils pour écrire des dialogues réalistes.

Penelope's comment, May 21, 2013 3:17 PM
Merci'!
Scooped by Sarah McElrath
Scoop.it!

Writing like a duck out of water | Sarah McElrath's World Walkings

Writing like a duck out of water | Sarah McElrath's World Walkings | Feed the Writer | Scoop.it

Are you writing like a duck out of water? You should be.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sarah McElrath
Scoop.it!

Writing and Fear

Writing and Fear | Feed the Writer | Scoop.it
I owe much of my understanding of suspense and fear on the page to one single terrifying experience.
Sarah McElrath's insight:

What scares you? What haunts you? Use that to write scenes that ring true.

more...
No comment yet.