Feed the Writer
1.8K views | +0 today
Follow
 
Rescooped by Sarah McElrath from Scriveners' Trappings
onto Feed the Writer
Scoop.it!

Using Schoology and Collaboration to create student voice. | Where the Classroom Ends

Using Schoology and Collaboration to create student voice. | Where the Classroom Ends | Feed the Writer | Scoop.it

Discuss as a class what this means about them, their writing style, etc.  Sort students into groups of three based upon varying style characteristics.  You will want to make sure that your small groups have three different types of student “voices.”

Now, the next step depends on what applications you already use in the classroom. You could use Edmodo or Wallwisher and modify the assignment for use in those programs.  I personally like Schoology the best.  Its resemblance to Facebook is a selling point for students and it’s so neat and tidy in organization that it makes it easy to construct separate discussion threads within the program.  This will take some outside of classroom time to set up this exercise.

Create a schoology account for yourself and have your students sign up for their own, as well.  For each class you create the program will create a code.  When students are creating their accounts they will need that “code” in order to sign up for our class.  When you’ve done all of the grunt work you/your students should see this:
...

You’ll want to click the discussion thread and create a discussion thread group for each group of three.  This means in each class you’ll probably have 10-15 discussion groups.  You will be given the choice for each group to upload directions as well.

The sky’s the limit.  If you teach AP students, use this exercise for voice in their AP analysis.  If you’re teaching the personal essay, give them a topic and then have them construct the response reply by reply by reply.  Of course, you won’t want to do this for the entirety of any essay, so choose an intro paragraph, a body paragraph, a conclusion, anything.

Since Schoology’s format is similar to the Facebook “wall” function, you can students in small groups reply to each other’s writing.   Have them consider that they can’t alter the line coming before theirs, they simply have to “add” to the previous line using their own writing style to inform the creation of this assignment.  When finished, have students type their replies into a new post for that discussion thread.  See the “dummy” example below.


Via Heiko Idensen, Jim Lerman
more...
Sarah McElrath's curator insight, January 23, 2013 8:50 AM

Voice being one of the hardest things to teach--this would be worth a try.

Feed the Writer
Inspiration for writers
Curated by Sarah McElrath
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Sarah McElrath from Scriveners' Trappings
Scoop.it!

Teen March writing prompt calendar

Teen March writing prompt calendar | Feed the Writer | Scoop.it
One of the best ways to ensure you stick with a daily writing habit is to have plenty of prompts on hand. Teens thrive when they are given boundaries with generous margins. The twenty writing prompts in this free printable March writing prompt calendar provide the perfect amount of structure to stimulate your high schooler while allowing for plenty of creative expression!
The calendar is not dated, so you can use it year after year whenever you need writing inspiration for your middle school or high school student. Each week features five different categories of prompts so your tween or teen isn’t stuck in a rut of only expository or only persuasive topics.

Via Jim Lerman
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sarah McElrath
Scoop.it!

Mind-Mappers to Help You Organize Your Thoughts

Mind-Mappers to Help You Organize Your Thoughts | Feed the Writer | Scoop.it
You can skip paper and pencil by using these tools to help streamline the process of outlining ideas visually.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sarah McElrath
Scoop.it!

Everything You Didn't Do in 2016

Everything You Didn't Do in 2016 | Feed the Writer | Scoop.it
Frustrated by what you've left unfinished this year? Here's why you should celebrate your incomplete work.
Sarah McElrath's insight:
Celebrate the done and the undone. One cannot experience "flow" without butt in chair (or just doing it despite the gremlins that say you are no good.)
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sarah McElrath
Scoop.it!

Children's Publishing Blogs - Blogs blog posts

JacketFlap profiles more than 200,000 authors, illustrators, publishers and other creators of books for Children and Young Adults
Sarah McElrath's insight:
Check out the links to writer, agent, and publisher blogs on the right side and down.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sarah McElrath
Scoop.it!

6 Great Websites for Teen Writers | Brightly

6 Great Websites for Teen Writers | Brightly | Feed the Writer | Scoop.it
Rather than bombard teens with fancy pens and motivational reading, direct them to a comfort zone: the Internet. These sites are great resources for future storytellers.
Sarah McElrath's insight:
Share your insight
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Sarah McElrath from Scriveners' Trappings
Scoop.it!

101 Fabulous Plot Resources for Novelists

101 Fabulous Plot Resources for Novelists | Feed the Writer | Scoop.it

Via Alanna Shaw, Jim Lerman
more...
Alanna Shaw's curator insight, October 3, 2016 10:45 AM
While this list of ideas might be geared more towards the author in training, it is also a great place to get ideas for teaching creative writing to students.
Rescooped by Sarah McElrath from Scriveners' Trappings
Scoop.it!

How To Build Your Own Self-Hosted Author Website In 30 Mins

How To Build Your Own Self-Hosted Author Website In 30 Mins | Feed the Writer | Scoop.it
A step by step tutorial on how to set up your own self-hosted WordPress author website in less than 30 minutes. Plus tips on professional themes and setting up

Via elearning hoje, Jim Lerman
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sarah McElrath
Scoop.it!

Practutor Blog15 Great Tools to Publish Student Writing - Practutor Blog

Practutor Blog15 Great Tools to Publish Student Writing - Practutor Blog | Feed the Writer | Scoop.it
Publishing student writing does not mean posting their assignment on a blog. Learn how to publish student writing and showcase it to the world to read.
Sarah McElrath's insight:
Some great links here.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sarah McElrath
Scoop.it!

Readability Grader (Test) – Jellymetrics.com

Check if your content is too hard to read. Free forever.
Sarah McElrath's insight:
Could be useful to know readability level of your own blog, but also if using blog material with students.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Sarah McElrath from Writing Rightly
Scoop.it!

July/August 2016 Writing Contests

July/August 2016 Writing Contests | Feed the Writer | Scoop.it
July 2016 Type: Poetry Awards Hosted by: Literal Latte Deadline: July 15, 2016 Entry Fee: $10 Type: Nonfiction (College Student Stories) Hosted by: Chicken Soup for the Soul Deadline: July 31, 2016 Entry Fee: None Type: Nonfiction (Parent to Parent) Hosted by: Chicken Soup for the Soul Deadline: July 31, 2016 Entry Fee: None Type:…

Via Penelope
more...
Penelope's curator insight, July 5, 2016 12:46 PM
Writers, here are some contests to jump on before the end of July! 

***This review was written by Penelope Silvers for her curated content on "Writing Rightly" ***

Scooped by Sarah McElrath
Scoop.it!

The Official Manuscript Wish List & #MSWL ® Website

The Official Manuscript Wish List & #MSWL ® Website | Feed the Writer | Scoop.it
The official website of Manuscript Wish List (MSWL) and the #MSWL hashtag, supported and run by dedicated people in publishing. What do you want in your inbox?
Sarah McElrath's insight:
Great place to find out what type of manuscripts are wanted where.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Sarah McElrath from A Writing Life
Scoop.it!

No Time, No Money, No Motivation to Write? Here’s What to Do | Write to Done

No Time, No Money, No Motivation to Write? Here’s What to Do | Write to Done | Feed the Writer | Scoop.it
“ If you have no motivation to write, as well as other excuses like, no money, or no time - read this post. It will show you exactly how to get going.”
Via Penelope, Shannon Bolithoe
Sarah McElrath's insight:
N
Need at jumpstart? Read this.
 
more...
Penelope's curator insight, May 21, 2016 1:40 PM
Linda always gives us writers a good kick in the pants when we need it, and this article leaves my rear smarting.

Great motivation to get those fingers flying on the keyboard!

***This review was written by Penelope Silvers for her curated content on "Writing Rightly" ***

Rescooped by Sarah McElrath from Into the Driver's Seat
Scoop.it!

So you have a Twitter account. Now what?

So you have a Twitter account. Now what? | Feed the Writer | Scoop.it
I hear it all the time: “I have a Twitter account, but I don’t really know how to use it.”

I understand this thinking completely. Before I signed up to Twitter less than three years ago, I didn’t get it AT ALL. I would go to someone’s Twitter page—if that’s what it was even called—and none of it made sense. It was only slightly easier to read than HTML. I had a vague understanding that a “tweet” was a 140-character post, and some fuzzy memory of Ashton Kutcher doing some kind of charity thing on it a few years back, aaannnd that was pretty much it.

But I kept hearing people say things like, “Twitter is the best professional development I’ve ever had.” In my head I was basically calling BS on that. Because that’s what I tend to do when I don’t understand things. (It’s not my best quality.) So I went ahead and opened an account, and I pretty much did nothing with it for a while. Over time, I picked up a few tips, but it took about six months before I started using it with any regularity.

Now that I’ve been using Twitter for a few years, I get it. I really do. And I want you to get it now. Because I believe every educator really needs to be on Twitter and be able to use it well. All those Twitter accounts just sitting there, not getting used, are just wasted opportunity.

Via Jim Lerman
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Sarah McElrath from Scriveners' Trappings
Scoop.it!

March Writing Prompts Calendar gr. 3-8

March Writing Prompts Calendar gr. 3-8 | Feed the Writer | Scoop.it
One of the best ways to ensure you stick with a daily writing habit is to have plenty of prompts on hand. Kids thrive when they are given boundaries with generous margins. The twenty writing prompts in this free printable March writing prompt calendar provide the perfect amount of structure to stimulate your young writer while allowing for plenty of imagination!

Example writing prompts from the March calendar

If you fell from the sky with a parachute, where would you hope to land? Why?
If you could lift and bring home one heavy object, what would it be? What would you do with it?
Who was your favorite coach, teacher, scout leader, or Sunday school teacher? Why?
Describe something you would do if you knew you couldn’t possibly fail.
Many kids have a special blanket or stuffed animal they can’t sleep without. Did/Do you?
The calendar is not dated, so you can use it year after year whenever you need writing inspiration for your elementary students in grades 3-8.

Via Jim Lerman
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sarah McElrath
Scoop.it!

Journaling Apps That Inspire, Organize and Keep Out Snoops

Journaling Apps That Inspire, Organize and Keep Out Snoops | Feed the Writer | Scoop.it
Traditional diaries get an upgrade with apps that encourage writing, organize notes, use photographs and protect entries from nosy little brothers.
Sarah McElrath's insight:
Journal online AND keep your thoughts safe.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Sarah McElrath from Into the Driver's Seat
Scoop.it!

10 Ideas For Using Technology To Teach Writing by @Sophia_Clark89 · TeacherCast Educational Broadcasting NetworkbySophia Clark

10 Ideas For Using Technology To Teach Writing by @Sophia_Clark89 · TeacherCast Educational Broadcasting NetworkbySophia Clark | Feed the Writer | Scoop.it
To be a good writer one must constantly work on his skills. However, it is not bad news. Considering the abundance of technologies that can help you make it a fun and entertaining activity, you will have no problems advancing your skills as a writer.

Even if you are not really good with technologies, we will show a list of things you will master in no time. So, do not hesitate to try them all out both when teaching writing and when learning yourself.

Ten incredible technological solutions to help you teach and learn writing


Via Jim Lerman
Sarah McElrath's insight:
Share your insight
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sarah McElrath
Scoop.it!

The 120 Most Helpful Websites For Writers in 2016 - Global English Editing

We’ve created a comprehensive list of 120 of the best websites for writers in 2016. No more searching aimlessly around the internet.
Sarah McElrath's insight:
14 categories for helpful writing websites--including grammar tips, literary agents, protect yourself, writers as business owners, and more. 
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Sarah McElrath
Scoop.it!

The 100 Best Websites for Writers in 2016

The 100 Best Websites for Writers in 2016 | Feed the Writer | Scoop.it
Kick your writing career into high gear with this year’s list of the best writing websites.
Sarah McElrath's insight:
Some great websites for inspiration--and advice.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Sarah McElrath from Scriveners' Trappings
Scoop.it!

5 Killer Online Journaling Tools You Should Try Out

5 Killer Online Journaling Tools You Should Try Out | Feed the Writer | Scoop.it
A selection of online journaling tools that you can use to take your journaling practice digital.

Via elearning hoje, Jim Lerman
more...
Penelope's curator insight, November 14, 2016 10:02 PM
Journaling is a great way to sort out emotions and solve problems. Bonus? You're squeezing in writing at the same time. Five online tools can make the job so much easier. Evernote, one of my favorites, makes the list again!

***This review was written by Penelope Silvers for her curated content on "Writing Rightly"***

Walter Gassenferth's curator insight, November 22, 2016 4:31 AM

Post very interesting, revealing some aspects that I did not know about journaling tools. For those who speak Portuguese or Spanish, more about business tools can be read in http://www.quanticaconsultoria.com

Scooped by Sarah McElrath
Scoop.it!

NaNoWriMo: An #EduAwesome Project for Your #BestYearEver

NaNoWriMo: An #EduAwesome Project for Your #BestYearEver | Feed the Writer | Scoop.it
We share evidence and practitioner-based learning strategies that empower you to improve K-12 education.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Sarah McElrath from Writing Rightly
Scoop.it!

650 Prompts for Narrative and Personal Writing: NYTimes.com

650 Prompts for Narrative and Personal Writing: NYTimes.com | Feed the Writer | Scoop.it
Here are 650 student opinion questions that invite narrative and personal writing, all together in one place.

Via Penelope
Sarah McElrath's insight:
Need something to get you--or your students writing? Great prompts.
more...
Penelope's curator insight, November 8, 2016 8:55 PM
Wow! Over half a million writing prompts to fire up creativity. Something for everyone.

***This review was written by Penelope Silvers for her curated content on "Writing Rightly"***

Rescooped by Sarah McElrath from Writing Rightly
Scoop.it!

NaNoWriMo: Planning a Novel with Evernote Templates Medium.com

NaNoWriMo: Planning a Novel with Evernote Templates Medium.com | Feed the Writer | Scoop.it

In November, nearly half a million people around the world will embark on a remarkable quest. National Novel Writing Month. 


Via Penelope
Sarah McElrath's insight:
For Evernote fans--or beginners--some templates to use during NANOWRMO
more...
Penelope's curator insight, October 14, 2016 12:20 PM
Fiction writing can be a daunting challenge for even the most talented. Facing a blank page can snuff out creative sparks that once burned brightly. 

Enter Evernote. I use this powerful tool all the time for clipping web pages, PDF's, etc. Evernote has created six powerful templates found inside this article that can be saved and used to the NANO writer's advantage. A little planning may get the timid writing instead of quaking. Super tool to add to your writing arsenal.

***This review was written by Penelope Silvers for her curated content on "Writing Rightly"***

Rescooped by Sarah McElrath from Writing Rightly
Scoop.it!

Story Arc | A Simple Way to Understand and Plot Your Novel

Story Arc | A Simple Way to Understand and Plot Your Novel | Feed the Writer | Scoop.it
A story arc is the chain on which the pearls, or scenes, of your novel are strung. The story arc--or narrative arc--is the same thing as "plot."

Via Penelope
Sarah McElrath's insight:
Helpful way to understand and organize plot.
more...
Penelope's curator insight, August 2, 2016 7:15 PM
Simply explained, this article is a great keeper to explain story arc. What it is, why it's important, and how to use it to make your novels pop with tension.

***This review was written by Penelope Silvers for her curated content on "Writing Rightly" ***


Scooped by Sarah McElrath
Scoop.it!

Are your settings multi-tasking in your story? | Sarah McElrath's World Walkings

Are your settings multi-tasking in your story? | Sarah McElrath's World Walkings | Feed the Writer | Scoop.it
Sarah McElrath's insight:
Describing your setting can do more than just anchor the reader in the scene. Are you leveraging your settings?
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Sarah McElrath from Scriveners' Trappings
Scoop.it!

10 Steps to Writing an Explainer Video [INFOGRAPHIC]

10 Steps to Writing an Explainer Video [INFOGRAPHIC] | Feed the Writer | Scoop.it
Sometimes you just need someone to explain to you how to write an explainer video. It's not circular logic, it's a great new infographic. Starting with the planning and detailing the writing process, this infographic will have you ready with a script in no time. Clarify your objects and identify your audience and start writing!

Via Jim Lerman
more...
Jim Lerman's curator insight, May 3, 2016 9:14 AM

Obviously, this infographic is for a business setting. But, as they say, a little thought will enable the process to be transposed to education.