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James Scott Bell: The "Write From The Middle" Method - WRITERS HELPING WRITERS

James Scott Bell: The "Write From The Middle" Method - WRITERS HELPING WRITERS | Feed the Writer | Scoop.it
Today we’re welcoming bestselling author and brilliant writing coach James Scott Bell to Writers Helping Writers. James has created a unique writing method that solves the “plotter or pantser” dilemma when it comes to structuring a novel, so please read … Continue reading →

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Christi Krug's curator insight, March 24, 11:46 PM

You've got your plotters, and you've got your pantsers (writing by the seat of their pants), and here's yet another option, writing from the middle.

 

But I daresay there are many, many more ways to write a novel and you won't know the best way for *you* until you experiment. And experiment. And experiment.

Mick D Kirkov's curator insight, April 1, 7:02 AM

Penelope

Mick D Kirkov's comment, April 3, 3:51 AM
@Christy Absolutely right. As Gorby (went forgotten last times, in vain) loved to say: "Once started, the thing will develop and go for itself. It has its own dynamism."
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10 Reasons You Should Do NaNoWriMo - Writing Rightly

10 Reasons You Should Do NaNoWriMo - Writing Rightly | Feed the Writer | Scoop.it
10 Reasons You Should Do NaNoWriMo

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Sarah McElrath's insight:

Come on, you know you want to write.

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Penelope's curator insight, November 6, 2013 11:46 AM

 

In honor of NaNoWriMo (National Novel Writing Month), I'm posting this informative (and amusing) article from the NaNoWriMo blog.

 

I have been signed up with NaNoWriMo for the past four years, but have not gone through process. For someone who needs a kick in the pants, this might be your gig.

 

Some of the 10 reasons you should frantically push through November and get a 50,000 word novel written?

 

o You love to write - what better reason!

o You have  story just burning to be told

o You want to escape chilly winters of the Northern Hemisphere

o You want to escape sunburns of the Southern Hemisphere

 

Read the post for the other six tips, and get started on your novel--today! You now have 24 days left to finish. Ready, set, go!

 

***This review was written by Penelope Silvers for her curated content on "Writing Rightly"***

 

Link to the original article: http://blog.nanowrimo.org/post/32671611607/10-reasons-you-should-do-nanowrimo

 

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Dani Shapiro on the Pleasures and Perils of Writing & the Creative Life

Dani Shapiro on the Pleasures and Perils of Writing & the Creative Life | Feed the Writer | Scoop.it

"It is in the thousands of days of trying, failing, sitting, thinking, resisting, dreaming, raveling, unraveling that we are at our most engaged, alert, alive."


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Sarah McElrath's insight:

So many of these quotes resonated with me. Here's one: "The British author and psychologist Adam Phillips has noted, “When we are inspired, rather like when we are in love, we can feel both unintelligible to ourselves and most truly ourselves.” This is the feeling I think we all yearn for, a kind of hyperreal dream state."

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Penelope's curator insight, October 22, 2013 9:52 PM

 

There is a mysterious and thought-provoking question; why do people want to write?

 

The answers are as varied as the individual writers themselves. The soul stirs, quickens, when pen is put to paper or fingers fly on the keyboard.

 

The writer's life is greatly romanticized. However, it requires grit. The truth is it can be very lonely. Take heed--if you choose this writer's life--you must drown in it.

 

***This review was written by Penelope Silvers for her curated content on "Writing Rightly"***

 

Link to the original article: http://www.brainpickings.org/index.php/2013/10/21/still-writing-dani-shapiro/

 

 

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Are You Writing in the POV You Think You’re Writing In? - Marcy Kennedy

Are You Writing in the POV You Think You’re Writing In? - Marcy Kennedy | Feed the Writer | Scoop.it
By Marcy Kennedy (@MarcyKennedy) Point of view problems are the most common problems I see as a freelance editor. And I’m not surprised. Point of view is a difficult concept to master, yet it’s also the most essential.

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Sarah McElrath's insight:

Helpful description of POV. 

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Penelope's curator insight, October 11, 2013 7:12 PM

 

Master your point of view (POV) and you have mastered a major part of writing a great story.

 

For those who are new at this lingo, point of view is simply the view from which the story is told. Who's doing the talking? Whose head are you in? POV comes in 4 types:

 

o Second Person - Tells the story using YOU

o Omniscient - Told by an all-knowing narrator

o Third Person - Told from "perspective" of single character

o First Person - The character is telling the story (uses I)

 

For specific examples of each, and further explanations, check out the article in its entirety.

 

***This review was written by Penelope Silvers for her curated content on "Writing Rightly"***

 

Link to the original article: http://marcykennedy.com/2013/10/writing-pov-think-youre-writing/

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How to Be a Writer: 210 Tips - Writing Rightly

How to Be a Writer: 210 Tips - Writing Rightly | Feed the Writer | Scoop.it
Do you wonder how to be a writer? These 201 tips will help you become the writer you were born to be.

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Penelope's curator insight, January 7, 8:25 PM

 

Let's start the new year out right, shall we?

 

For your reading and writing pleasure: A treasure trove of 201 tips for even the most seasoned of writers that should trigger fingers to begin flying across keyboards.

 

Write for yourself; write for others. Whichever it is, just write!

 

***This review was written by Penelope Silvers for her curated content on "Writing Rightly"***

 

Link to the original article:  http://writetodone.com/how-to-be-a-writer/

 

Jacques Goyette's curator insight, January 8, 3:16 PM

A good New Year resolution, to write properly follow Penelope tips.

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Scribophile - Writing Rightly

Scribophile - Writing Rightly | Feed the Writer | Scoop.it

"He Said, She Said: Dialog Tags and Using Them Effectively."


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Penelope's curator insight, October 30, 2013 6:01 PM

 

Dialogue can trip up even the most seasoned of writers. You can read about it all day long, but until you're actually writing and needing to use dialogue tags (or speech tags), you'll probably skip over this stuff.

 

Think of these tags as signposts, pointing to who is actually doing the talking. Each tag contains at least one noun or pronoun. (said, asked, whispered, remarked).

 

Susannah said

the clerk asked

she said and took off her coat

he said, looking sad

 

As I am writing my current novel, I sail merrily along, adding in some dialogue tags with ease, and getting myself mired in the mud at others.

 

Do I use he said or she said? Where does that comma go? Should I use a more expressive tag?

 

One thing to keep in mind: the "he/she said," or "he/she asked" will disappear in the reader's mind, while adding in an expressive tag will make it stick out like a sore thumb.

 

Read on if you, too, need a college lesson in drumming up the proper speech tag.

 

***This review was written by Penelope Silvers for her curated content on "Writing Rightly"***

 

Link to the original article: http://www.scribophile.com/academy/he-said-she-said-dialog-tags-and-using-them-effectively

 

Jacques Goyette's curator insight, October 31, 2013 4:44 PM

Tis is how dialog tags should be used.

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Take Your Writing From Meh To Memorable With These 12 Simple Techniques - Writing Rightly

Take Your Writing From Meh To Memorable With These 12 Simple Techniques - Writing Rightly | Feed the Writer | Scoop.it

Are you mesmerized by the beat of the content drum? There's no shortage of advice on how to create "great content."


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Penelope's curator insight, October 17, 2013 8:04 PM

 

Writers are apprentices. We should continually be working on our craft. Perfect it? Nah. But we can always improve.

 

This wealth-of-tips article was quite a find. The 12 tips are like tiny gold nuggets. If you apply even one,  it should actually take your writing--as it is right now--and color it golden.

 

A few nuggets:

 

o  People love STORIES--don't be afraid to tell one

 

o  Apply a little ALLITERATION - Using the same letter or sound to start multiple words in the same sentence. (EX: Write the way you want)

 

o  Consider CADENCE - Play with syllabication. Just as in music think "rhythm"  (Quick and the Dead)

 

o  Power of THREES - Give examples, adjectives, and sentences in three's (3 little pigs, 3 wishes, etc.)

 

o Longish SENTENCE, then a short one. The short one will sound TRUE.

 

Read through all the tips to pick up some new ideas to add more color to your own writing.

 

***This review was written by Penelope Silvers for her curated content on "Writing Rightly"***

 

Link to the original article: http://www.websearchsocial.com/take-writing-from-meh-to-memorable-with-12-simple-techniques