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How over 2 feet of rain caused historic flooding in Louisiana in less than 72 hours

How over 2 feet of rain caused historic flooding in Louisiana in less than 72 hours | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
All-told, over 20 inches of rain fell in less than 72 hours around Baton Rouge.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 16, 9:58 PM

Last month I was in New Orleans, and it rained for about 2 hours…it was staggering to see how many issues stemmed from that drainage in such a flat floodplain.  This is so much worse.  This article focuses on the weather/environmental situation, and this one on the political/human impact.

 

Tags: urban ecology, environmentweather and climate, water, disasters

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The Ogallala Aquifer

The Ogallala Aquifer | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
Hidden beneath the 245,000 square miles that make up the Great Plains, resides a lake that’s one of our greatest water assets: The Ogallala Aquifer. Haven’t heard of it? Farming the plains would be unprofitable at best without it, as shown by the Dust Bowl of the 1930s. At the time, the aquifer’s existence was known, but the technology to tap into it wasn’t.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 22, 2015 9:27 AM

Portions of the High Plains Aquifer are rapidly being depleted by farmers who are pumping too much water to irrigate their crops, particularly in the southern half in Kansas, Oklahoma and Texas.  This podcast explores the environmental and economic impacts of this unsustainable situation.


Tags: wateragriculture, environment, consumption, resources, environment depend, podcast.

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New Images Show China Literally Gaining Ground in South China Sea

New Images Show China Literally Gaining Ground in South China Sea | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
Satellite photos show the speed, scale and ambition China has exerted to assert ownership over South China Sea islands, far from the mainland.

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Marc Meynardi's curator insight, April 13, 2015 2:40 AM

Suprisingly, the other countries dont show a lot of concerns.

Norka McAlister's curator insight, April 15, 2015 10:06 PM

China is a powerful country with a population of 1.357 billion people. China as a regional hegemony, the more land means expansion of territorial control on the region and projecting sea power on international waters. However the main reason why China, the Philippines, and other countries are trying to claim these islands is due to the oil and natural gas exploitation in the South China Sea. Even when geopolitical conflicts between Philippines and other countries arise, any of these countries will have to form powerful armies in order to fight against China. The U.S. would be the only country that could pursue different strategies and mediate agreements between China’s neighbors. However, through military intimidation, China would overpower any country that tried to claim these islands as part of their territory. 

Lora Tortolani's curator insight, April 20, 2015 1:37 PM

China has its hopes on securing the land that is rich in oil to bring prosperity to the country.  China is building a great wall of sand and seems as though they are not fearful of others stopping it even though China has been warned that these actions create tension from Taiwan, the Philippines, and Vietnam.  

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Who Owns The North Pole?

"Though uninhabited and full of melting ice caps, the Arctic is surprisingly an appealing piece of real estate. Many countries have already claimed parts of the region. So who technically owns the North Pole? And why do these nations want it so bad?"


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Rich Schultz's curator insight, January 2, 2015 5:52 PM

Great question!  I think we all know the answer...Santa Claus!! ;)

Sammy Shershevsky's curator insight, January 17, 2015 4:57 PM

The video discusses a big topic in discussion today - Who really owns the North Pole? Although the North Pole is uninhabited, many countries have claimed to take ownership of the vast majority of land (or, ice). Canada has already claimed that the North Pole is part of its nation. Russia has put up Russian flags on the North Pole (such as underwater) but does that really make North Pole a Russian territory? The media plays a role in this by offering different opinions on who should and who deserves the right to own the North Pole. You might read a Canadian article that lists all the outright reasons why the North Pole is or deserves to be a Canadian territory. 

Felix Ramos Jr.'s curator insight, March 6, 2015 7:26 PM

In my opinion, I don't understand how the United nations can be seen as an entity that, essentially, controls who would have rights to a place like the North Pole(technically, not owned by anyone).  I, naively, understand the basics of the U.N.  In short, it is an organization that was formed, post-WW I or II, as a governing board for world-issues.

 

 With that being said, how can they believe that their "law" is the all-powerful one?  If I'm a leader of a country who is not a member of the U.N., do I really care what they say?   I just find it odd that this narrator speaks about the issue while holding the U.N. as a supreme authority.  I know that this video is just a quick fun type of video but it leaves me with wanting to hear the perspective of a non-U.N. member.  But a very interesting topic, none the less.

 

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Drought Drains Lake Mead to Lowest Level

Drought Drains Lake Mead to Lowest Level | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

"The largest reservoir in the U.S. falls to its lowest water level in history, Nevada State Sen. Tick Segerblom introduced a bill title and issued a press release on July 8 calling for an 'independent scientific and economic audit of the Bureau of Reclamation’s strategies for Colorado River management.'"

 

This week’s history-making, bad-news event at Lake Mead has already triggered lots of news stories, but almost all of these stories focus on the water supply for Las Vegas, Phoenix and California. But what about the health of the river itself?

 

Tags: physical, fluvial, drought, water, environment.


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Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, July 12, 2014 3:09 AM

Consequences of urbanisation 

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, July 12, 2014 3:10 AM

Option topic : Inland water and management

Tom Franta's curator insight, July 12, 2014 11:40 AM

Many geographers are aware that future water resource issues in the American Southwest will have political, cultural, and social impacts.  What do you believe to be some approaching concerns after reading this article?

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China's territorial claims

One of the geography videos embedded in this interactive map: http://bit.ly/KDY6C2


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John Nieuwendyk's curator insight, December 17, 2014 5:24 PM

China is imposing these territorial claims as it is a benefit for their economy. That being said this can cause geo-political tensions that can have detrimental effects on how one country trades with another. 

WILBERT DE JESUS's curator insight, April 27, 2015 12:09 PM

China is currently creating islands in the south china sea to be able to claim the 200 nautic miles around those islands as their EEZ, a chapter of cheeting in its claims over control of the south china sea.

Felix Ramos Jr.'s curator insight, May 6, 2015 3:08 PM

China's rise to prosperity over the last couple of decades is not solely  alarming for far-reaching regions of the world but also its neighbors.  This video highlights that with its coverage of the land-disputes between China and its Eastern and Southeastern Asian neighbors.  It's only common sense to realize that once a nation becomes a world power it will seek to grow even more powerful.  couple that with the fact that a small nation will inevitably feel self-conscious compared to its huge neighbor you get the phenomenon that is covered in this video.

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Colorado River Reaches the Sea of Cortez

Colorado River Reaches the Sea of Cortez | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

"When the Minute 319 'pulse flow' began in March 2014, it was not clear whether the effort would be enough to reconnect the Colorado River with the Sea of Cortez. Some hydrologists thought there might be just enough water; others were less optimistic. It turns out the optimists were right, though just barely. For the first time in sixteen years, the Colorado River was reunited with the Sea of Cortez on May 15, 2014."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 28, 2014 5:57 PM

California has had three consecutive years of below average rainfall and most reservoirs are far below their designed capacity; amid a drought this severe and wildfires, it is startling to hear of a project to restore some of the Colorado River Basin's natural patterns and ecology.  


Tags: physicalremote sensing, California, water, environmenturban ecology.

Kate Buckland's curator insight, June 7, 2014 7:43 PM

Parallels with the Murray River...

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Megacities Reflect Growing Urbanization Trend

Read the Transcript: http://to.pbs.org/b6sR86 The capital of the South Asian country Bangladesh, Dhaka, has a population that is booming. However, it stands ...

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Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 8:50 PM

To be a megacity like this, you have to conform to urbanization. There is no possible way to have such a populated and crowed city with farmlands around. This is a place of business yet residential areas, it also is where the marketplaces are and where kids go to school. Megacities need to be a part of an urban society in order for them to stay afloat.

Bec Seeto's curator insight, October 30, 2014 6:07 PM

This is a great introduction to the demographic explosion of the slums within megacities.  This is applicable to many themes within geography.   

Sarah Cannon's curator insight, December 14, 2015 10:20 AM

I can't image or even relate to the experience of living in a place like this. With rivers polluted right outside your house. And those rivers are what people bathe in and wash their clothes. I can't imagine not being able to access clean drinking water or lacking food. The people in Dhaka endure so much their whole lives, a good percentage of them will always live in poverty.

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What is in a Name?

What is in a Name? | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
Issues in Focus East Sea...

 

Does it matter if I call the sea to the east of the Korean Peninsula the "East Sea" and if you call the body of water the west of Japan the "Sea of Japan?"  Absolutely.  When dealing with matters of diplomacy, a name reflects how a country is viewed.  For many years the Sea of Japan has been the defacto name internationally and South Korean officials have lobbied (quite successfully) to bolster the legitimacy of the name within the media, publishers and cartographers.  What other places have multiple names?  What are the political overtones to the name distinctions?  To watch a 10 video on the history of the name, see: http://bit.ly/Lu5puJ  


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Don Brown Jr's comment, July 3, 2012 8:19 PM
This issue seemed to be largely overshadowed by China’s claims in the Philippines. While changing the name of the Sea of Japan may have no immediate tangible impact on either country, it will certainly have a symbolic one and could possible pave the way for a claim to exclusive water rights within the area in the future. If a valuable resource such as oil is discovered in this disputed area then perhaps Russia, China or even the US will also get involved?
Seth Dixon's comment, July 5, 2012 9:55 AM
Symbolic value is South Korea's main aim, to minimize Japan's (their former colonizer) dominance in the region.
Lamar Ewing White III's comment, August 23, 2012 5:20 PM
Of course it matters whether you call it the East Sea opposed to calling it the Sea of Japan, just like it matters if you call the Mississippi River the Central River or something lame like that. I feel like Japanese citizens would take much offense if someone tried to change the sea's name. It is traced back to Japanese history and heritage which kind of gives them the right to have it named after them. I use the Mississippi River as a comparison because it also traces history and heritage and has every right to be named after the state. Also, (and this might be off subject), if we changed the name of Sea of Japan it would probably take a generation to get the name remembered as "East Sea". It would only create confusion just like if we changed the name of the Mississippi.
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How being surrounded by water made the Dutch different

How being surrounded by water made the Dutch different | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
While researching a book on ‘Why the Dutch are Different’, Ben Coates realised that an amazingly large number of the things which an outsider might think of as ‘typically Dutch’ could be explained at least in part by a single factor: water.

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asli telli's curator insight, October 15, 2015 1:37 AM

What is "typically" #Dutch? #sea #saltwater #sailing #trade #ancient #heritage

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, November 7, 2015 9:50 AM

unit 3

Sarah Nobles's curator insight, November 27, 2015 7:55 AM

Environmental Determinalism....Unit 3

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How to fix California's drought problem

How to fix California's drought problem | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
California has enough water—that's not the problem, says Terry Tamminen. So here's how you solve the drought crisis.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 20, 2015 2:26 PM

There is no easy fix to a complex problem such as the water shortage in California.  Some coastal cities are considering desalinization projects while others want to reduce environmental regulations that protect wetland ecosystems to harness all of the freshwater available.  One of the issues is that most of California's precipitation occurs during a very short time frame.  Before the water crisis, these potential flood waters were diverted into concrete management canals but this article advocates to build more underground cisterns to capture excess rainfall before it flows to the ocean.   


Tags: consumptionCalifornia, water, environment, resources, environment dependurban ecology.


"When the well's dry, we know the worth of water." ~Benjamin Franklin

Eden Eaves's curator insight, May 24, 2015 5:50 PM

The sunny state of California does in fact get enough rain fall each year but because storm sewers were built after continuous flooding, all of this rainfall is pushed into the Pacific Ocean rather than where it it needed now.

A solution to the insane drought taking California by storm is to use simple rain barrels to collect water at a typical home and a graded lawn to capture and retain water, allowing it to seep into the ground rather than run off into the streets and eventually into the ocean. 

Lydia Tsao's curator insight, May 25, 2015 2:20 AM

The article relates to irrigation and the conservation efforts discussed in Unit 5. Irrigation has a lot to do with the drought in California because massive amounts of water are being used for agriculture in California, which consists of water-needy fruits and vegetables. There are efforts to try to conserve water by installing rainwater collectors to reuse water instead of just draining usable rainwater to the ocean and rivers. There have also been installations of grey water pipes to reuse for irrigation. Grey water is any water that is flushed down the drain that isn't sewage, such as water from showers or water from washing machines. This way water wouldn't have to be wasted and can be reused.

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California Drought Tests History of Endless Growth

California Drought Tests History of Endless Growth | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
A punishing drought is forcing a reconsideration of whether the aspiration of untrammeled growth that has for so long been the state’s engine has run against the limits of nature.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 6, 2015 8:30 PM

Major urban areas in California have limited local water resources so they draw water from large area to bring in sufficient water for these burgeoning metropolitan regions.  With this current drought getting worse, California has ordered emergency water restrictions on residents while companies and large farms have been granted exemptions even though they account for 82% of the state's annual water consumption (residential accounts for 12%). Almond farms alone consume 10% of the state's water, and many agricultural crops are incredibly water intensive land uses.  A better way to think of it isn't just about raw water usage though.  A better question to ask would be this--how does one gallon of water translate into calories that most efficiently feed people?


Questions to Ponder: How does the concept of carrying capacity relate to California urban growth/drought issues?  California passed its carrying capacity?  How are demographics, economics, politics and the environment intertwined in California?  What are the environmental limits on urban growth and development? 


Tags: physical, weather and climate, consumptionCalifornia, water, environment, resources, environment dependurban ecology.

LEONARDO WILD's curator insight, April 9, 2015 8:49 AM

The mathematics of endless growth due to economic monetary rules has a clear outcome.

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The world's megacities that are sinking 10 times faster than water levels are rising

The world's megacities that are sinking 10 times faster than water levels are rising | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
Scientists have issued a new warning to the world’s coastal megacities that the threat from subsiding land is a more immediate problem than rising sea levels caused by global warming.

 

A new paper from the Deltares Research Institute in the Netherlands published in April identified regions of the globe where the ground level is falling 10 times faster than water levels are rising - with human activity often to blame.

In Jakarta, Indonesia’s largest city, the population has grown from around half a million in the 1930s to just under 10 million today, with heavily populated areas dropping by as much as six and a half feet as groundwater is pumped up from the Earth to drink.

The same practice led to Tokyo’s ground level falling by two meters before new restrictions were introduced, and in Venice, this sort of extraction has only compounded the effects of natural subsidence caused by long-term geological processes.

 

Tags: coastal, climate change, urban, megacities, water, environment, urban ecology.


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Adilson Camacho's curator insight, August 2, 2014 12:32 AM

Perception!

Matt Evan Dobbie's curator insight, August 2, 2014 6:55 PM

Huge problem when combined with sea level rise

MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 2014 6:53 PM

APHG-U7

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Ethiopia's Dam Problems

Ethiopia's Dam Problems | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

"Ethiopia is three years from completing a dam to control its headwaters, and while Egypt points to colonial-era treaties to claim the water and to stop the project, the question remains as to who own the Blue Nile."


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Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, July 20, 2014 8:00 PM

Option: Inland water 

dilaycock's curator insight, July 21, 2014 9:09 PM

Useful example to illustrate the interactions and tensions between natural resources and political systems.

Kate Buckland's curator insight, July 26, 2014 10:38 PM

At least the Murray-Darling Basin is within one country - even if it covers 4 states!

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Where Will The World's Water Conflicts Erupt?

Where Will The World's Water Conflicts Erupt? | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

As the climate shifts, rivers will both flood and dry up more often, according to the latest report from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. Shortages are especially likely in parts of the world already strapped for water, so political scientists expect feuds will become even more intense. To track disputes worldwide, researchers at Oregon State University spent a decade building a comprehensive database of international exchanges—-both conflicts and alliances—over shared water resources. They found that countries often begin disputes belligerently but ultimately reach peaceful agreements. Says Aaron Wolf, the geographer who leads the project, “For me the really interesting part is how even Arabs and Israelis, Indians and Pakistanis, are able to resolve their differences and find a solution.”


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Adilson Camacho's curator insight, June 20, 2014 2:50 PM

Questões políticas... 

J. Mark Schwanz's curator insight, June 21, 2014 11:01 AM

Add water to geography education curriculum? You better believe it. The crisis of the 21st century is and will be water.  

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, May 21, 2015 11:36 AM

summer reading KQ2: How have humans altered the Earth's environment?  Water Security

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Megacities Reflect Growing Urbanization Trend

Read the Transcript: http://to.pbs.org/b6sR86 The capital of the South Asian country Bangladesh, Dhaka, has a population that is booming. However, it stands ...

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Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 8:50 PM

To be a megacity like this, you have to conform to urbanization. There is no possible way to have such a populated and crowed city with farmlands around. This is a place of business yet residential areas, it also is where the marketplaces are and where kids go to school. Megacities need to be a part of an urban society in order for them to stay afloat.

Bec Seeto's curator insight, October 30, 2014 6:07 PM

This is a great introduction to the demographic explosion of the slums within megacities.  This is applicable to many themes within geography.   

Sarah Cannon's curator insight, December 14, 2015 10:20 AM

I can't image or even relate to the experience of living in a place like this. With rivers polluted right outside your house. And those rivers are what people bathe in and wash their clothes. I can't imagine not being able to access clean drinking water or lacking food. The people in Dhaka endure so much their whole lives, a good percentage of them will always live in poverty.

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Satellites Reveal Sudden Greenland Ice Melt

Satellites Reveal Sudden Greenland Ice Melt | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
NASA researchers are expressing concern about something they've never seen before: the melting of ice across nearly the entire surface of Greenland earlier this month.

 

Climate changes are afoot in the Arctic and the Greenland ice sheet.  For more on the Arctic, see: http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2012/jul/26/arctic-climate-change ; In related news, Texas and Louisiana have introduced education standards that require educators to teach climate change denial as a valid scientific position. South Dakota and Utah passed resolutions denying climate change. Tennessee and Oklahoma also have introduced legislation to give climate change skeptics a place in the classroom. http://articles.latimes.com/2012/jan/16/nation/la-na-climate-change-school-20120116


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Sarah Curtis's comment, September 3, 2012 3:33 PM
I didn't know how bad global warming was until I read this article and I don't think many people realize it either. We need to start changing our ways if we want to live in a safe and healthy environment. I think more people need to see images and read articles like this so they have a better knowledge on how little time we have.
Morgan Halsey's comment, September 10, 2012 11:30 PM
Some people still don't believe in global warming, but now with new technology, there is great evidence. New technology has allowed us to explore our world in ways that we have not been able to before. We are now able see things about our world and fix problems before they become worse.
Michael Grant's comment, September 12, 2012 4:12 PM
I am surprised about how the polar ice caps are melting and that global warming is very real, but on the other hand it's just part of the Earth maturing