FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY
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This is an incredible visualization of the world's shipping routes

This is an incredible visualization of the world's shipping routes | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

"Ships carry 11 billion tons of goods each year. This interactive map shows where they all go.  About 11 billion tons of stuff gets carried around the world every year by large ships. Clothes, flat-screen TVs, grain, cars, oil — transporting these goods from port to port is what makes the global economy go 'round.  And now there's a great way to visualize this entire process, through this stunning interactive map from the UCL Energy Institute."


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aitouaddaC's curator insight, May 2, 8:44 AM
On pourra voir aussi , en français  et en allemand :  http://ddc.arte.tv/nos-cartes/le-transport-maritime-coeur-de-la-mondialisation
South Florida Guide's curator insight, May 3, 11:40 AM
Very interesting.
Caitlyn Scott's curator insight, June 14, 10:25 PM
This resource shows great detail into where are products travel when they are imported but also shows us what and where Australian products are going. Good source in regards to showing how large Australia's export market is. Article contains a good amount of information as to why the routes shown on the map are taken as well as having in-depth data showing the different cargo on board ships. This data helps high light what different countries are renowned for in their exports as well as giving so information into why some countries are poorer than others when analysing their exports. Planned use within unit regarding the cost of Australian exports and its sustainability for the future.      
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How one German millennial chose to live on trains rather than pay rent

How one German millennial chose to live on trains rather than pay rent | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

"When others get off the train to finally go home, Leonie Müller stays behind. That's because she already is home: The train is her apartment, and she says she likes it that way. She bought a subscription that allows her to board every train in the country free. Now, Müller washes her hair in the train bathroom and writes her college papers while traveling at a speed of up to 190 mph. She says that she enjoys the liberty she has experienced since she gave up her apartment."


Tags: mobility, transportation, housing, popular culture, Europe, Germany. 


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Mark Hathaway's curator insight, October 9, 2015 9:46 AM

This is no question that living on a train is a radical decision to make. It is a direct challenge to the idea that you are suppose to settle into one particular area. While I doubt that this specific phenomenon will catch on, our society is becoming more mobile.  People are becoming less tied down to one specific area. The Millennial generation is changing many of the previous social norms. The Millennial generation is waiting longer than any previous generation to marry and start a family. Many are even questioning the institution of marriage itself.  Members of the older generations, will decry these changes. This is a familiar cycle that occurs through out history. The Older generation always decries the changes instituted by the Younger generation.

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The Speed Burden [Costs of Sprawl]

The Speed Burden [Costs of Sprawl] | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
The need for speed devours huge chunks of American cities and leaves the edges of the expressways worthless. Busy streets, for almost all of human history, created the greatest real estate value because they delivered customers and clients to the businesses operating there. This in turn cultivated the highest tax revenues in town, both from higher property taxes and from elevated sales taxes. But you can't set up shop on the side of an expressway. How can cities afford to spend so much to create thoroughfares with no adjoining property value?

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Alexa Earl's curator insight, March 14, 2015 10:48 AM

This blog really made me realize what an impact humans are to the environment. They compare different cities and talk about the impacts and it really showed me how humans have built up cities.

Brian Wilk's curator insight, March 21, 2015 6:12 PM

A side by side comparison at first blush is striking but the devil is in the details. Florence, Italy is a city of only 368,000 while the Atlanta metro area is about 4.5 million. Agree that sprawl is ineffective real estate and efficiency wise, but fuel prices may be having a counter effect on the reduction of sprawl. It is much less expensive to commute given the price of oil at its current levels and the millennials will have a say in this urban sprawl contracting or expanding. Many do not own cars, relying on commuter systems within the city to get around. This in theory should drive down demand for fossil fuels, culminating in reduced prices for gasoline. If the infrastructure is already built, was is the cost to maintain it, given the static population of the large metro areas? Interesting to see how this plays out.

Kristina Lemson's curator insight, April 16, 10:38 PM
This post is interesting for us given the massive Mitchell Freeway and Wanneroo Rd  development just north of Banksia Grove. How do you think this perspective adds to the issues you could discuss in your project report? 
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Outside the Amtrak Window, a Picture of the U.S. Economy

Outside the Amtrak Window, a Picture of the U.S. Economy | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
The death and life of the industrial corridor linking New York and Washington.

 

This article is a great example of analyzing the landscape to observe changes in any given place.  This corridor is home to 8 of the 10 wealthiest counties; at the same time this transportation corridor is also home a half a dozen of the country's most broken cities.  Exploring this area is way to analyze the changing economic geographies of the United States.  For a visual representation of these same themes, see this 5 minute video that corresponds to this NY Times magazine article. 

 

Tags: industry, economy, unit 6 industy, transportation, neighborhood, landscape.


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Don Brown Jr's comment, November 20, 2012 12:06 PM
I can’t help but think of Rhode Island, specifically communities in Providence and how the decline of the textile industry and rise of the automobile has affected the contrast in standards of living and opportunities between the residents of the East Side and South Providence.
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Recycling Steel

Steel is strong, versatile and 100% recyclable. Learn how old steel shipping containers are given a new lease on life as liveable spaces.

 

Reusing resources is a critical part of sustainability.  This video looks at the recycling of steel including the creating of container homes.


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What Are You Flying Over? This App Will Tell You

What Are You Flying Over? This App Will Tell You | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

Flyover Country uses maps and data from various geological and paleontological databases to identify and give information on the landscape passing beneath a plane. The user will see features tagged on a map corresponding to the ground below. To explain the features in depth, the app relies on cached Wikipedia articles. Since it works solely with a phone’s GPS, there’s no need for a user to purchase in-flight wifi. Sitting in your window seat, you can peer down on natural features like glaciers and man-made features, such as mines, and read articles about them at the same time.

 

Tags: mobility, transportation, technology, physical, geology.


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YEC Geo's curator insight, March 12, 10:01 AM
Kind of like your own personal Google Earth.
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Nicaragua's Controversial Canal

The proposed Nicaragua Canal could be one of the largest engineering projects in history and promises to bring thousands of jobs to the impoverished country. But the government’s secretive deal with a Chinese-led firm has some Nicaraguans raising the alarm about displacement and environmental destruction in the canal’s path.

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Blake Joseph's curator insight, April 24, 2015 4:38 PM

The Chinese government is seriously considering plans to build a new canal through Nicaragua that will rival the United States' Panama canal. The size of the planned canal will be much larger than the Panama canal, allowing much bigger freighters and cargo vessels to be able to pass through it to and from the Chinese mainland. While many Nicaraguans are enthusiastic about the potential jobs and money involved in the project, others can see through this and sense great problems for the country if completed. The canal would destroy many environments within Nicaragua such as Lake Nicaragua and the forest that are located nearby, displacing many people who live and depend on the area for food and work. China is fast becoming a world superpower, and is alarmingly similar to the old Soviet Union as far as a lack of environmental protection and the welfare of citizens. I fear the future environmental impact this will have on Nicaragua could be devastatingly similar to the fatal impacts of other old Soviet failures like the Aral Sea or Chernobyl (without the radioactive isotopes, of course). I think many Nicaraguans do as well.

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, June 1, 2015 2:13 AM


Chapter 5

Humans value, change and protect landscapes

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, April 5, 8:12 AM

I'm fascinated by massive geo-engineering projects.  Usually, the proponents of the project will support it claiming that by reconfiguring the geographic settings it will lead to the economic growth of the country and strengthen their political situation.  Opponents cite that traditional land use patterns will get disrupted, the poor will be displaced, and the environment will be degraded. This canal is not so very different from many other geo-engineering projects in that respect.

 

Tags: transportation, Nicaragua, globalization, industry, economic, environment, political, resources, political ecology.

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The Most Common Job In Every State

The Most Common Job In Every State | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

"The jobs picture has changed profoundly since the 1970s. This interactive map and accompanying charts show how those changes played out across the country."

 

Tags: economic, labor, USA, transportation, industry.


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Norka McAlister's curator insight, February 14, 2015 7:48 PM

With the new millennium, jobs have been changed. Also, with new technology, which has led to an increased unemployment rate, different kind of jobs have shifted during the last past two decades. Driver trucks are one of the vast modes of transportation in the U.S. and between Mexico and Canada. It does not require too much to be a tractor-trailer truck operator. Usually, the drivers have a high school diploma and attend a professional truck-driving school. As the economy grows, the demand for goods will increase, and more truck drivers will be needed to keep supply chains moving. Truck drivers provide an essential service to industrialized societies by transporting finished goods and raw materials over land, typically to and from manufacturing plants, retail, and distribution centers. As technology continues to advance, massive globalization seems to be a better option for the economy. Driver trucks present a good chance in the workforce. As a result, driver truck careers are projected to grow 11% between 2012 and 2022. Furthermore, truck driving is a part of American lifestyle, and one of the fastest growing of all occupations.

Michael Amberg's curator insight, May 26, 2015 11:33 PM

This is an interesting way to look at each state and it makes sense given the economic opportunities in each state.

Kevin Nguyen's curator insight, September 21, 2015 12:34 PM

It's so amazing within 36 years the most common jobs in United States changed drastically. The dominated jobs of secretaries and machine operators got replaced to quickly as new technologies are developed. The one that stuck out the most were truck drivers because it was relatively common in the 1980's and now its dominated the whole country. People are shifting from jobs that machines has replaced and are working in jobs that actually need human involvement. It will be very interesting to see how machines in the future will replace truck drivers without causing major accidents or teaching a human being without classroom interactions.

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Documentary: Last Train Home

Documentary: Last Train Home | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

Every spring, China's cities are plunged into chaos as 130 million migrant workers journey to their home villages for the New Year in the world's largest human migration.

 

I've posted in the past about this documentary which portrays the The cultural importance of New Year's in China and the massive corresponding migratory shifts that take place.  What is new is that the 85 minute documentary is now available online.  "Last Train Home takes viewers on a heart-stopping journey with the Zhangs, a couple who left infant children behind for factory jobs 16 years ago, hoping their wages would lift their children to a better life. They return to a family growing distant and a daughter longing to leave school for unskilled work. As the Zhangs navigate their new world, Last Train Home paints a rich, human portrait of China's rush to economic development."

 

Tags: China, EastAsia, migration, development, labor, development, transportation, unit 2 population.


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Betty Denise's comment, October 10, 2012 1:29 PM
The request video is not available ...