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Florida, before Disney

Florida, before Disney | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
Watch Mike Wallace's 60 Minutes report from 1972 to see the Florida that existed before Mickey and millions of tourists descended on Orlando.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 14, 9:08 PM

This 11 minute video from the archives is a great profile of a community in flux.  Orange County, Florida was transitioning from an agricultural region off the grid to a largest tourist destination in the United States.  Obviously, the community's economic geography completely transformed, but the cultural shift to the region was equally drastic.  Since Disney today is such a well-known brand and so many students have been to Disney World, they will enjoy seeing what the community was like before it became an entertainment mecca. 


Tags: place, tourism, economichistorical.

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These two maps show the shocking inequality in Baltimore

These two maps show the shocking inequality in Baltimore | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
How vacant houses trace the boundaries of Baltimore's black neighborhoods.


The map on the left shows one very tiny dot for each person living in Baltimore. White people are blue dots, blacks are green, Asians are red and Hispanics yellow.The map on the right shows the locations of Baltimore City's 15,928 vacant buildings. Slide between the two maps and you'll immediately notice that the wedge of white Baltimore, jutting down from the Northwest to the city center, is largely free of vacant buildings. But in the black neighborhoods on either side, empty buildings are endemic.


Tags: neighborhood, gentrification, urban, place, economic, race, poverty, spatial, housing.


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Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, May 1, 9:37 AM

Unit 7

Lauren Quincy's curator insight, May 24, 9:14 PM

Unit 7: Cities and Urban Land Use

 

This article is about Sandtown, Baltimore and its shift into a disamenity sector. It explains how this neighborhood, mainly housed by blacks, had a high percentage of vacant houses. The article says that this neighborhood is overrun with poverty, war on drugs and gangs and has the more residents in jail than any other neighborhood. This shows the changing demographics of the city of Baltimore.

 

This relates to unit 7 because it covers the topic of disamenity sectors and changing demographics. It shows reasons for the high levels of poverty and abandoned housing. It also shows the racial spatial distribution of the neighborhood and its correlation to housing and development.  

Lydia Tsao's curator insight, May 26, 1:46 AM

This article left me heart broken. The African American community in Baltimore is stuck in a deep poverty cycle, and it cannot seem to escape its impoverished past. Even now, the poverty in the area seems to just be getting worse. The problems of income disparity lead to more problems than just economic; they lead to social and political problems. Social unrest and injustice occurs as a result of the modern white flight. This article arose as a result of the death of Freddie Gray, whose death demonstrates a significant social issue that needs to be addressed: police brutality and the criminal targeting of the African American community. His death stems from the tremendously amounts of disparity in the city. Promoting investment in the inner city would definitely help alleviate the poverty in the area. The problem is getting people to invest.

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50 Reasons to #LoveTheWorld

50 Reasons to #LoveTheWorld | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
We asked a range of people, from writers and chefs to musicians and photographers, to share one experience from the last year that truly inspired them – something that, in no uncertain terms, reminded them why they love the world. Madly. Here's what they told us.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 13, 12:30 PM

Most geographers have more than a little bit of wanderlust.  This BBC article is filled with images, quotes and insights into places all around the globe that fill me will a sense of awe and wonder.  For students that have the curiosity, it our mission as educators to cultivate that and help them frame information about the world into a geographic perspective.  I've always felt that window-seat flyers are have the seed of a geographer embedded within them...let's make sure those seeds can grow. 


Tags: place, tourism.

LEONARDO WILD's curator insight, April 14, 9:45 AM

The World is beautiful, but that is not being advertised except by those who want to make money with its beauty (tourism), or call attention to the fact we are destroying it (ecologists). News of destruction and suffering and corruption fill the news outlets, giving us a warped, one percent view of the planet we live in. The only one we have.

Norka McAlister's curator insight, April 18, 3:22 PM

Traveling around the world exposes all culture, traditions and history that probably you will fall in love with. These outstanding images around the world empathize regions, food, people, space, and how people survive on a daily basis will make your mind travel and enjoy places. In every image, we can take and admire sceneries from every single part of the world. Photography captures every image such of cultures, sceneries and geography for people who cannot afford to travel around world.

Break Dancing, Phnom Penh-Style

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Is Your Neighborhood Changing? It Might Be Youthification, Not Gentrification

Is Your Neighborhood Changing? It Might Be Youthification, Not Gentrification | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
One urban planning professor has defined this as a process that occurs in discrete stages.

 

Much has been made of the wave of millennials moving to cities. In intriguing new work, geographer and urban planner Markus Moos of the University of Waterloo gives the phenomenon a name: “youthification.” Moos defines youthfication as the “influx of young adults into higher density” cities and neighborhoods. And in some ways these neighborhoods are “forever young,” where new cohorts of young people continue to move in as families and children cycle out in search of more space.

 

Tags: neighborhood, gentrification, urban, place, culture, economic.


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Norka McAlister's curator insight, February 14, 7:50 PM

As opportunities are continually found in big cities, so too are young people migrating to these prosperous cities. Culture in the youth population has been restructured with new ideas, open mindedness, freedom, and also how the city offers many comforts. They plan out their future in the city because it has so many amenities, with amazing transportation in between other areas. Expectations are raised because young people consider things in different perspectives. New urban developments such as old manufacturing buildings being converted into housing apartments offer the youth suitable living arrangements and accommodations. However, mature populations keep being displaced to the suburban areas, due to different expectations. Older people prefer more relaxation in their lives and they are not very interested in the most advanced technologies. As young people keep moving to the big cities, these highly populated areas have to structure new patterns to develop urban sections.

Cass Allan's curator insight, February 17, 7:45 PM

Changing neighbourhoods

ZiyCharMatt's curator insight, February 20, 12:09 PM

This city talks about which cities in the United States have the largest amounts of young and old residents. This is important because those cities with large amounts of young people (like Austin) are likely to be on the cutting edge of innovation and it is those cities that we can look to to show the rest of the nation the future of urban design. I believe that this article is very interesting and provides a good insight into which parts of the country are advancing quickly and which parts are sating rooted in the past.

 

-Charles Bradbury

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Stop Complaining About Gentrification Unless You Know What It Is

Stop Complaining About Gentrification Unless You Know What It Is | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

"In many cities, it's become popular to hate 'gentrifiers,' rich people who move in and drive up housing prices -- pushing everyone else out. But what's going on in these rapidly-changing urban spaces is a lot more complicated than that."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 28, 2014 2:02 PM

Gentrification can be a very touchy subject.  What appears to be economic revitalization of a down-trodden neighborhood to one, can appear to be systematic removal of minorities to another.  This op-ed isn't a whole-hearted embrace of gentrification, but it might be seen as a critique of the gentrification critics.

  

Tags: neighborhood, gentrificationurban, place, culture, economic.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, September 8, 2014 12:38 PM

unit 7

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France to redraw nation's map to save money

France to redraw nation's map to save money | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

"France's administrative regions — Normandy, Alsace, Burgundy, etc. — have long been part of the identity of citizens of this diverse country. Now, merging some of them is seen as a logical way to save money on bureaucracy, and the French support it — as long as it's someone else's turf."


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Jordan Schemmel's curator insight, May 21, 2014 1:04 PM

How countries identify smaller administrative regions is crucial to understanding both how they are governed, and how these regions impact cultural differences.

Kampe Kyle's curator insight, May 28, 2014 10:18 PM

In AP Human Geo., this article relates to the theme of redistricting and political reapportionment because it involves the redrawing of geographic boundaries within a country in order to facilitate a certain political and economic outcome.

Joy Kinley's curator insight, June 16, 2014 3:28 PM

It is amazing that people are all for redrawing and redistricting until it impacts them.  This is a touchy subject in the United States with some small towns and communities merging even though they only have decades of identity not centuries.  If these merges happen in France I see that there will be many strikes and protests and when it is over everyone still would maintain what they would call their "real identity" not what France gave them.  

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Concentrations of Wealth and Poverty

Concentrations of Wealth and Poverty | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

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Monica S Mcfeeters's curator insight, December 18, 2013 9:59 AM

See where the wealth and poverty are in America using this great map.

Chandrima Roy's curator insight, January 9, 2014 10:44 PM

wonderful

 

Ishwer Singh's curator insight, January 20, 2014 6:56 AM

This picture shows the cocentrations of poverty and affluence.  The areas hilighted in yellow show the areas which are wealthy and the dark blue showing the poor. This coincides with the amout of pay and the education levels in these countries. Areas such as Boston, New York and Washington show high cocentrations of affluence. These areas also have much higher education systems and more well -paid jobs. Countries which are highlighted in dark blue are countries with lesser education and lesser paid jobs. This shows the  extent at which poverty can affect a country.

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How Wal-Mart Used Payoffs to Get Its Way in Mexico

How Wal-Mart Used Payoffs to Get Its Way in Mexico | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
Wal-Mart de Mexico was an aggressive and creative corrupter, offering large payoffs to get what the law otherwise prohibited, an examination by The New York Times found.

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James Hobson's curator insight, September 23, 2014 1:17 PM

(Mexico topic 9)

It is troubling to discover how bribery still continues to promote special interests at the expense of others and their own interests. Though other articles I have commented on discuss the improving economy and politics of Mexico, this one clearly shows an area that needs much more attention.

   Despite this, all of the fuss (though justifiable) may be slightly over-exaggerated in my opinion. Just look at the photo above: the WalMart is at least somewhat set back from the pyramids, BUT the smoke and smog from other industries fills the air right up to and all around the pyramids themselves. I think this is just as much, if not more, of an injustice to the cultural site. While one can choose whether or not to enter a store, it is impossible not to breathe in the polluted air and have one's view limited while visiting such a place.

   Lastly, although bribery is certainly something I deeply frown upon, perhaps it is slightly less "wrong" than it would be in other countries like the US. Since Mexico's government and its departments have a reputation (at least from what I've heard) of being corrupted, perhaps the only way to build a store is to offer a bribe. It would be interesting to see if this was the case with other store locations throughout Mexico.

Kendra King's curator insight, February 2, 8:50 PM

Clearly it is horrible what Walmart did, but what about everyone else in this scenario? Walmart was able to damage public history and jeopardize the traffic safety of Mexico because they figured out the going price for those concepts was: a couple mayors, some INAH official, and an Urban Operations official (see article for in-depth explanations of how each was bought off). All of whom bypassed their duty to the public. See I am not surprised by the corporation’s actions. The corporation is acting for its own self-interest like many corporations have historically done. In fact, compared to the East India Company of 1800 (which had its own standing army) this is tame (see below article). I would prefer companies not to operate as such, however a company will act in such a manner so long as it is permitted. Deterring such actions falls on the fault of the officials who were so easily bought off.

 

Yet, whose job is it to police a corporation? At one point, the article mentioned that when the Mexican investigation found nothing wrong with Walmart they, “chided protesters for failing to present any specific proof.” I’m sorry, but it isn’t the protesters job to go out and find proof. That is the job of an investigator, whom I might add didn’t do a good job given the evidence the New York Times was able to amass. Unfortunately (or maybe fortunately) for Mexico, they probably aren’t that apt at forensic banking because they are a largely agrarian society who only relatively recently is being introduced to the corporate world. Looks like there is a whole new specialty that Mexico will need to learn soon due to globalization. I say Mexico needs to learn this also because it is mainly their job to monitor their people. I understand that this is an American company so on some level they will have to monitor their people. However, majority of the people involved in this were in Mexico. Thus, Mexico will need to deal with their side of justice and also start developing environmentally usefully laws under the new corporate rule (i.e. ones that protect historical artifacts even when the “proper” licenses have been secured.)

 

I am not looking to just pick on Mexico’s corporation problems either because we all know the United States has their fair share of corporate issues. In fact, I think it is safe to say that Walmart could have bought off people in the United States too. Think of all the tainted deals that occurred in the subprime mortgage crisis. We aren’t even sure because no one actually went after them! At least in the case of Walmart there is an investigation going on again. It will be interesting to see what the end result is though. Most times, it isn’t near what a company should get. In the United States some are literally able to get away with murder. Just look at GM's latest court dealings. I hope Mexico can do a better job than the United States when it comes to handling corporate investigations in the future.  

 

* http://www.economist.com/node/21541753

Bob Beaven's curator insight, February 5, 2:32 PM

This article shows the "forced globalization" of Mexico.  I thought it was interesting how Walmart de Mexico would use such cutthroat means to build a "intermediate sized store".  Yet the Walmart officials in Mexico realized that being not too far from a major tourist attraction would help business.  There were many groups who tried to stop it from happening, but they could not stop the store from being built.  This article shows how corporate Globalization is ruthless, and it doesn't care about disobeying laws.  This article also shows that if a company is big enough, it can, in effect do whatever it pleases.  In the United States on the other hand, this type of bribery could never have happened. 

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Where Does the South Begin?

Where Does the South Begin? | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
Roads? Religion? Accent? Food? Which factor dictates where the North ends?

 

This is a great intellectual expercise to help student think about regions and how we define them.  The article can help also inform some of their thinking since one of the main problems for students in drawing regional boundaries is a lack of place-based knowledge.   

 

Tags: regions, USA.


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Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, October 12, 2013 6:49 PM

Borders... the first thing I think of was a giant bookstore near my hometown... it now ceases to exist, having been replaced by Barnes and Nobel...  As for the political organization of space, I could apply this situation and laugh.  Borders will cease to be, and they will be called after people's last names!  I think this has already happened, when people unite together in countries such as the USA- although borders are specific, the general federal laws and many policies still apply in all states... generally. And people's names are often the namesakes of places.  I don't like the idea of borders, though, it seems like a bunch of warmongers trying to get ahead in a world where they can't truly cheat death, so they cheat other people of land that may have been decreed in ancient documents as property of their ancestors, or even in accordance with the righteousness of the universe and what should be alloted to whom.  Ownership is a concept of denial, because no one can truly own anything, not even our bodies, which contain trillions of infinite universes the size of the large one around us that we commonly refer to.  Borders are relative, and will likely become recognized as obsolete.  I know this was abstract, but it's my thoughts on the topic.

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In Remembrance: Teaching September 11

In Remembrance: Teaching September 11 | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

The the United States, 9/11 is memorialized in our landscapes and is etched in our collective consciousness.  This coming Tuesday is the anniversary and Teaching History has put together a host of teaching materials about the importance and impact of the terrorist attacks of Septemper 11th, 2001 on the U.S. and the world.

 

Tags: Landscape, terrorism, conflict, states, political, place, historical, unit 4 political.


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Aaron Feliciano's comment, September 12, 2012 5:47 PM
9/11 will always be remembered in the eyes of americans and they will never forget what they were doing that day. i know i will not
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Political Symbolism in the Religious Landscape

This is a great juxtaposition of communal identities. Before becoming a part of Canada, this was the Cathedral of St. James. As a part of the British Empire, places such as Victoria Square became a part of the Montreal landscape. In what appears to me as a symbolic strike back against the British Monarchy's supremacy, this Cathedral is renamed Marie-Reine-du-Monde (Mary, Queen of the World). The fact that the Hotel Queen Elizabeth is looming overhead only heightens the tensions regarding whose queen reigns supreme; this isn't the real issue. The dueling queens served as a proxy for tensions between British political control and French cultural identity in Quebec several generations ago.


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 12, 4:43 PM

I was recently in Montreal; my last few Instagram posts aren't the prettiest pictures of my time in Canada.  I tried to select images that represented geographic concepts and would be the things I'd mention if we were on a walking tour of the city. 


TagsCanadasocial media, urban, economic, images, placeculture, landscape, tourism

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52 Places to Go in 2015

52 Places to Go in 2015 | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
Untrammeled oases beckon, once-avoided destinations become must-sees, and familiar cities offer new reasons to visit.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 3, 11:39 AM

Most geographers have more than a little bit of wanderlust.  Maybe we don't all have the pocketbook for it, but so many people have the desire to explore, travel and see parts of the world that feel as if they are mythical.  For students that have the curiosity, it our mission as educators to cultivate that and help them frame the world into a geographic perspective.  I've always felt that window-seat flyers are have the seed of a geographer embedded within them...let's make sure those seeds can grow. 


Tags: place, tourism.

Aki Puustinen's curator insight, April 19, 9:51 AM
Yes Sir - June to Milan !
Norka McAlister's curator insight, April 25, 5:16 PM

There are a variety of places to choose from when it comes to vacationing, but one of these places may be in your next trip in 2015. All countries have their own attractions. You will find from old cities to modern suburbs to sky-scraping metropolitan cities establishing their place global tourism market. But one thing that shocks me is how the country of Cuba has been open to the tourism business, where for so many years their communist system has been failing and now they seem to be attracted to the tourism business. In many of these countries, building development has stopped for long time but in other places, modern infrastructure brings more tourists to the city. Urbanism plays a big role in how to distribute the cities. Furthermore, cultures, cities, variety of natural landscape, natural beaches, and tradition are some of few points that attract tourism business in the area. However, in some of these places religion, political, and security needs to be addressed and policies must be implemented in order to market these areas as tourist zones. Islamic countries, communist countries, old and modern cities, and even poor countries are all becoming good places to visit in 2015.

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What’s in a Nickname? In the case of Chiraq, a Whole Lot

What’s in a Nickname? In the case of Chiraq, a Whole Lot | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

"Nicknames are important branding strategies used by civic boosters, and Chicago’s namesakes are frequently employed to market the city and its surrounding region as 'The Jewel of the Midwest' and 'Heart of America.' At the same time, urban monikers can arise from the wider public and they have sometimes been used to draw attention to negative qualities of Chicago life."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 11, 9:37 PM

Is it Londonderry or just Derry?  Xinjiang or Eastern Turkestan?  The Sea of Japan or the East Sea?  Persian Gulf or Arabian Gulf?  Names and nicknames have political and cultural overtones that can be very important.  As the author of this AAG article on the Chicago's nickname, Chiraq says, "city nicknames are more than a gimmick; they can define geographies of violence, marginalization, and resistance."


Tags: Chicago, urban, place, language, toponyms.

Norka McAlister's curator insight, March 15, 8:07 PM

Illinois has been stigmatized by many negative nicknames such as "Killinois," "Shot-town," and "Chiraq." Urban crime hs always been a problem in the city of Chicago, and the most remarkable areas are on the south side of Chicago. High unemployment, poor neighborhoods, and lack of parenting/mentoring, and failing school districts all contribute to the number of young people turning to steet crime in order for survival. With so many gangs acitivities on the street, Chiraq is a city of violence and war. Chaos on the street and the killings of many innocent people increasing, government  officials needs to react with strict regulations in order to stop this violence. Poor economic status has played a significant role in the deterioration of the city. Citizen who were once classified as middle have become a part of the poor class. The relocation of housing projects in proximity to wealthier communities has instilled fear of the expansion of gang violence and activity within residents of these communities.

Lauren Quincy's curator insight, March 19, 12:53 PM

Unit 3: Cultural Practices and Processes

 

This article is about how Chicago's many nicknames represent its culture and people's sense of the place. Many people have began to call Chicago by the name of "Chiraaq" and mixture of Iraq and Chicago. This is due to the violences in the city and resemblence to the action in Iraq. The nickname’s power, politically, is the way in which naming functions as a form of shaming and the name has been advertised on shirts, posters and even songs putting it into the category of pop-culture. As suggested in research, place names are not confined to official nomenclature on maps, but also include competing, vernacular systems of naming. Chicago’s many nicknames provide insight into the different ways that people frame and reconfigure the image of the city for the wider world.


This relates to unit 3 because it deals with vernacular regions and popular culture. The different names of Chicago are often not defined with a definite boundary of the city, rather an individuals opinion or idea of the area. They are often very vague with the names such as "Paris on the Prairie" that not only include Chicago but neighboring towns and cities as well. Or the opposite, where the name "Sweet Home" may only be referring to a portion of the city rather than the entire city of Chicago. The names, such as Chiraq, also fall under pop-culture when they become a widely known idea and are adopted by many sources. The advertisement and use of the nickname in songs and merchandise shows the wide range of distribution for the nickname. The use of the word is often changing and will be popular for a short period of time as popular culture is always changing. 

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11 Signs Your Hood Is Being Gentrified

11 Signs Your Hood Is Being Gentrified | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
A Washington, D.C., resident describes the changes and privilege that have moved into her longtime neighborhood.


Tags: neighborhood, gentrification, urban, place, culture, economic, Washington DC.


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Emily Bian's curator insight, March 22, 8:48 PM

7) Uneven development, zones of abandonment, disamenity, and gentrification

This article was written by a woman who noticed a lot of changes in Washington D.C. Gentrification led to these many changes, by becoming not as unique and urbanizing at other people's expense. She describes gentrification as remodeling very quickly and ferociously. A lot of the things she says are for the general good of the people, like installing street lights, but don't take into consideration the people who don't appreciate the changes. Stores like walmart are taking over the family owned stores, and more people are moving in. 

This article describes gentrification perfectly, and I like her pictures to go along with it. I think this would help introduce this vocab term to new students. 

Lydia Tsao's curator insight, March 24, 12:29 AM

Sadly, gentrification happens all across the world. Poor populations in cities are disadvantaged and often have to move out due to wealthier populations moving in. One of the signs I found most disturbing was that police will start patrolling the areas where wealthier and poorer populations mix. This is a sad reality. Police do this to ensure that crime rates are low as poor people would be more tempted to commit crimes in wealthier neighborhoods. I do think this police patrolling has racist roots since the poorer population in Washington D.C. is mostly black. Words like "renewal" and "redevelopment" hide the sad reality behind gentrification/

Ricardo Cabeza de Vaca's curator insight, May 25, 9:36 PM

I believe this article is very interesting because it shows how gentrification can change a neighborhood. I believe gentrification is a little bit of a negative thing because it adds geographical uniformity to our modern society and yes that could be good thing in measure. The article states now police patrol every street, Walmart's and 7-11's start showing up, areas will start becoming more aesthetically pleasing, but is that really a good thing? I believe that sometimes while you are driving by it is better to have a change in your surrounding, rather than seeing the same thing over and over again even if it is more modern.

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How Cities Use Design to Drive Homeless People Away

How Cities Use Design to Drive Homeless People Away | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

"Saying 'you're not welcome here'—with spikes."


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Michael MacNeil's curator insight, August 2, 2014 8:38 AM

Lack of understanding of mental disability can lead to heartlessness. There is so much that needs to be done.

dilaycock's curator insight, August 3, 2014 3:50 AM

I'd never really taken notice, or heard of some,  of the architectural deterrents mentioned here. I can't believe that we, as a society, go to such lengths to make life even more difficult for those already struggling. 

MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 2014 6:52 PM

APHG-U7

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Countries Divided on Future of Ancient Buddhas

Countries Divided on Future of Ancient Buddhas | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
Thirteen years after the Bamian Buddhas were blasted into rubble, opinion is split on whether to leave them as is, rebuild them, or make copies of them.

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Edelin Espino's curator insight, December 15, 2014 5:27 PM

Camels are such a work-shipping animals, their support hundreds of weight from the people also take gallons of waters. If I ever visit Egypt I will make sure to ride one. Although, those are donkeys. Anyway good news, in my opinion it shouldn't be rebuilt. Leave history as it is. 

Bob Beaven's curator insight, March 19, 12:46 PM

Most people often forget that the Silk Road passed into Central Asia and the Middle East from East Asia.  This means that along the road, travelers often put things that reminded them of home.  The Buddha statues that once existed in Afghanistan are an example of this.  They were in fact labeled a world heritage site.  Sadly, the Buddhas had been ravaged throughout history by radical arabs.  This is because their religion frowns upon (actually forbids) idols, which they considered the statues to be.  Although they had been tempered with for many years, the Taliban finally decided to blow them up in 2001.  Now, there are differing opinions across various countries as to whether they should be rebuild or not.  Afghanistan believes that they should be rebuilt so the government can claim a symbolic victory over the Taliban.  Unesco wants a restoration done right, so for now it won't allow rebuilding to occur.  Germans tried to rebuild them, but Unesco blocked it from happening.  South Korea, Italy and Japan are all willing to donate money, but have no mention of the statues.  I believe that the statues should be rebuilt, as the article points out monuments were rebuilt in France after Protestants burnt down many old Gothic Cathedrals.  I also believe it is necessary because we cannot let the culture of hate that the Taliban believes in to win.  Average Muslims realize that the statues have historical significance and that they do not need to worship Buddha to respect that this site was 1,500 years old.  I also think it would send a strong message from the Afghan government if the statues were rebuilt because it would show they, like the article states, are not going to let the Taliban rule their country.

 

Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, April 7, 9:42 PM

I find it interesting that other countries are divided.  Why are they deciding the future for this country?  They can't seem to get out of their ways to come up with a real solution.  Its unfortunate.  

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Inequality and the Gini Coefficient

Inequality and the Gini Coefficient | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
Think everyone should just pull themselves up by their bootstraps? Try this one on for size.

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Heidi Hutchison's curator insight, October 12, 2013 1:46 PM

Just incredibly awesome, but so, so sadly true.

Ms. Harrington's curator insight, October 12, 2013 3:00 PM

Educating in poverty

Alison D. Gilbert's curator insight, October 16, 2013 7:47 AM

Do you find this information surprising?

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Twitter Languages in London

Twitter Languages in London | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

This map is a fantastic geovisualization that maps the spatial patterns of languages used on the social media platform Twitter.  This map was in part inspired by a Twitter map of Europe.  While most cities would be expected to be linguistically homogenous, but London's cosmopolitan nature and large pockets of immigrants influence the distribution greatly.

   

Tags: social media, language, neighborhood, visualization, cartography.


Via Seth Dixon
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Betty Denise's comment, November 7, 2012 1:13 PM
Thank you – again – for your tremendous partnership
Ursula O'Reilly Traynor's comment, December 14, 2012 9:29 PM
thanks for this! we have shared!
Ursula O'Reilly Traynor's comment, December 14, 2012 9:29 PM
thanks for this! we have shared!
Rescooped by FCHSAPGEO from Geography Education
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Social Media and Place

Social Media and Place | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
Facebook most social cities: People everywhere use Facebook to check in to places. Here you can see the 5 top hotspots of the most "social"cities.

 

Questions to ponder: What attributes do these commonly 'checked into' landmarks have in common?  Are you surprised that some are or are not on the list?

 

Tags: socialmedia, place, tourism, infographic, London, NYC, Paris.


Via Seth Dixon
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