FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY
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This is an incredible visualization of the world's shipping routes

This is an incredible visualization of the world's shipping routes | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

"Ships carry 11 billion tons of goods each year. This interactive map shows where they all go.  About 11 billion tons of stuff gets carried around the world every year by large ships. Clothes, flat-screen TVs, grain, cars, oil — transporting these goods from port to port is what makes the global economy go 'round.  And now there's a great way to visualize this entire process, through this stunning interactive map from the UCL Energy Institute."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 29, 5:26 PM

If you haven't discovered www.shipmap.org then you are in for a treat.  This delightful geographic visualization nicely shows the shipping lanes and connectivity that makes the globalized economy flow.  

 

Tags: transportation, globalization, diffusion, industry, economic, mapping, visualization.

aitouaddaC's curator insight, May 2, 8:44 AM
On pourra voir aussi , en français  et en allemand :  http://ddc.arte.tv/nos-cartes/le-transport-maritime-coeur-de-la-mondialisation
South Florida Guide's curator insight, May 3, 11:40 AM
Very interesting.
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Thanksgiving Maps, Posters and Geospatial Data

Thanksgiving Maps, Posters and Geospatial Data | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

"Thanksgiving resources for geography educators." http://wp.me/P2dv5Z-1lR


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Interactive Gnomonic Map

Interactive Gnomonic Map | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 30, 2015 9:24 AM

As stated on USGS map projections page: "[Gnomonic maps are] used by some navigators to find the shortest path between two points.  Any straight line drawn on the map is on a great circle, but directions are true only from center point of projection."  This interactive is a very fun way  to visualize this and to understand distortion.

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See where women outnumber men around the world (and why)

See where women outnumber men around the world (and why) | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

"A new study maps the population gaps between men and women around the world."

 


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Laura Lee Smith's comment, September 7, 2015 7:19 PM
This is actually something I discussed a while back with a friend of mine who is from Russia, how there is such a huge lack of marriageable men that women there consider being a mail order bride a good alternative to spinsterhood.
Laura Lee Smith's comment, September 7, 2015 7:19 PM
This is actually something I discussed a while back with a friend of mine who is from Russia, how there is such a huge lack of marriageable men that women there consider being a mail order bride a good alternative to spinsterhood.
Cohen Adkins's curator insight, September 8, 2015 4:59 PM

Its amazing how well balanced some countries are with the ratio of men to women how ever some of the 3rd world countries are off balance but not to an extreme.

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The Food Capitals of Instagram

The Food Capitals of Instagram | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
Explore the popularity of some of the world’s favourite foods on Instagram. Discover Instagram’s capital of curry, which cities are big on burgers, and where pulled pork is most prolific.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 12, 2015 8:41 PM

I was talking to a good friend about the geographic distribution of poutine after watching the silliest YouTube video. (Montreal is famous for it's poutine, but is in equally widespread throughout Quebec?  Canada?  Is there a core/domain/sphere areas to be mapped? These are the questions that plague geographers.).  True, this map has it's limitations; Instagram hashtag data isn't normalized so the biggest cities tend to pop out more easily, access/use of Instagram isn't uniform, etc.  Still, what a great map to show some geographic applications of social media data.  This sort of map also nicely shows the spatial concepts of region, diffusion, concentration and distribution.  


Tags: visualizationsocial media, mapping, culturediffusion, popular culture, regions, food.

Immigration Overseas Complaints's comment, August 21, 2015 8:50 AM
Nice Post You Can Know About Our Service | http://immigrationcomplaints.india.com/post/immigration-overseas-no-complaints-always-found-positive-review-40013
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My daughter can’t read a map. And your kid probably can’t either

My daughter can’t read a map. And your kid probably can’t either | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
Ask any teenager for directions and he can pull up Google Maps quicker than you can recite an address. Pretty awesome, right? And I’ll be the first to admit that having a map in my phone that not only tells me where to turn but how long it will take me to get there is pretty amazing. I use it all the time, honestly. But even when I’m zoning out and listening to that soothing voice telling me where to turn, I have a mental picture in my head of her directions. And I never realized that my teenage daughter doesn’t have a map in her head, because she’s never really had to use one. Ever.

 

Tags: education, K12, geography education, spatial, mapping.


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Cade Johns's curator insight, August 16, 2015 9:26 PM

I think maps on your phone is great but what about if you get lost and you don't have service on your phone then what are you gonna do?Most young people have never had to read an actual map so most likely they won't be able to find their way back to civilization. CJ

Ethan Conner's curator insight, August 17, 2015 8:56 AM

Many people cannot read maps because of technolagy. This new form of maps are keeping children from the traditional way. Also keeping them from education.

Aaron Burnette's curator insight, August 26, 2015 9:50 AM

Although cell phone and technology is helpful, other people still believe in the prideful way. Reading paper maps.

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Bad Maps Are Everywhere These Days. Here's How to Avoid Being Fooled

Bad Maps Are Everywhere These Days. Here's How to Avoid Being Fooled | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
Tips from a geographer who's seen it all.

 

Tags:  mapping, cartography, 201, perspective, map.


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lackingingot's comment, June 30, 2015 2:58 AM
Excellent...!!
Kevin Barker's curator insight, June 30, 2015 10:35 AM

Excellent article with examples for exploring the ways in which maps can fail or mislead us.  This is particularly important considering how easily maps can be created by anyone through the availability of digital resources.

Angus Henderson's curator insight, July 2, 2015 2:04 AM

A mapping 'take-down' of great detail, with lots of of interesting linked examples

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100 Years of National Geographic Maps

100 Years of National Geographic Maps | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
Since 1915, National Geographic cartographers have charted earth, seas, and skies in maps capable of evoking dreams.

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Bharat Employment's curator insight, February 5, 2015 12:35 AM

www.bharatemployment.com

Matt Davidson's curator insight, February 5, 2015 5:17 AM

Beautiful article on an amazing organisation - the history of maps and map-making tells us so much about how people have viewed the world through history - great for year 7.

Lydia Tsao's curator insight, May 26, 2015 2:32 AM

All I can say is: WOW. I loved looking at the maps in this picture. When I think of maps, I usually just think about a plain old mercator projection of the world. However, this article has reminded me of how special each and every map it. Each map is made by a group of people who put in a lot of time and effort to giving the public the best information. I would have never thought of mapmaking as reaching as deep at the Atlantic ridges and reaching as high as the moon. It is simply amazing how much these mapmaker must understand of the world and even to some extent the Universe to make these maps. Maps are simply amazing. However, this does remind me of the article I read about how HarperCollins omitted Israel from the maps in the Middle East. It just shows that our perceptions of maps as objective things just are not that true. Maps do show favoritism and may leave out certain countries or territories that the group of people who made the map do not like or do not recognize.

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How to Interpret a Satellite Image: Five Tips and Strategies

How to Interpret a Satellite Image: Five Tips and Strategies | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
What do you do when presented with a new satellite image? Here's what the Earth Observatory team does to understand the view.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 3, 2014 9:30 AM

Aerial photography can be quite beautiful, as can satellite imagery. These are more than just pretty pictures; interpreting aerial photography and satellite imagery is not easy; here is a great article that gives an introduction on how to interpret satellite imagery. With a little training, satellite images become rich data sources (instead of some visually meaningless data).  Using Stratocam, you can explore and tag some of the amazing place on Earth. 


Tags: mapping, perspective, remote sensing, geospatial, unit 1 Geoprinciples.


Sharrock's curator insight, November 3, 2014 12:05 PM

Seth Dixon's insight:

Aerial photography can be quite beautiful, as cansatellite imagery. These are more than just pretty pictures; interpreting aerial photography and satellite imagery is not easy; here is a great article that gives an introduction on how to interpret satellite imagery. With a little training, satellite images become rich data sources (instead of some visually meaningless data).  Using Stratocam, you can explore and tag some of the amazing place on Earth. 

 

 

Tags: mapping, perspective, remote sensing, geospatial, unit 1 Geoprinciples.

 

Michael Meller's curator insight, November 3, 2014 11:34 PM

Cool

 

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Why everyone should be able to read a map

Why everyone should be able to read a map | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
New research suggests that map reading is a dying skill in the age of the smartphone. Perish the thought, says Rob Cowen

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Lindley Amarantos's curator insight, September 5, 2014 9:17 AM

this can explain why it is important to NOT always rely on technology. It is good to keep your brain active and the spatial awareness that comes with reading a map is invaluable

Dolors Cantacorps's curator insight, September 5, 2014 3:13 PM

Practiquem-ho a classe doncs!

Richard Thomas's curator insight, July 30, 2015 10:52 PM

Despite the gendered overtones of the article (that it's important for men to learn to read a map), this is some good advice, regardless of gender.  The vocabulary and concepts of maps can strengthen spatial cognition and geography awareness.  While GPS technology can help us in a pinch, relying primarily on a system that does not engage our navigation skills will weaken our ability to perform these functions.  While it intuitively makes sense, that the 'mental muscles' would atrophy when not used, it is a reminder that an overuse of geospatial technologies can be intellectually counterproductive.  So break out a trusty ol' map, but more importantly, be a part of the spatial decision-making process. 


Tags: mapping, spatial, technology, education.

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Topography of Religion

Topography of Religion | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

"The Pew survey sorts people into major groupings--Christians; other religions, including Jewish and Muslim; and 'unaffiliated,' which includes atheist, agnostic and 'nothing in particular.'  Roll your cursor over the map to see how faiths and traditions break down by state."


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Ignacio Quintana's curator insight, December 1, 2014 6:56 PM

Even though this is just an info-graphic, this is very interesting. What we can see from this map is the spatial organization of religion specifically in the U.S. It's interesting to see how protestant makes up the majority (but apparently not according to the article above this from Haak's page) and how drastically these views can change from coast to coast, and state to state. What I find particularly interesting is that you can clearly find hearths of many of these religions, for example, Utah has an extremely out-numbering amount of Mormons. For obvious reasons that is, but still very educational to see the centers of many of the big religions in the United States.

Joshua Mason's curator insight, January 28, 2015 8:46 PM

Looking at the map, it looks like the Northeast is predominately Catholic while the further South you go along the Eastern coast, you find more Protestants, mostly Evangelical, especially in the from Confederate States. The Mid and Northwest seems to hold a healthy mix of all the Christian denominations while places in the Southwest have a higher Catholic percentage, my guess would be from immigration from Mexico. The one odd ball out in the Southwest is Utah with its 58% of Mormons.

Molly McComb's curator insight, March 21, 2015 4:04 PM

Different cultural religions and senses of place in America. This graph shows the diversity of religion around the united states as it varies from place to place. 

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40 Maps That Explain The Middle East

40 Maps That Explain The Middle East | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
These maps are crucial for understanding the region's history, its present, and some of the most important stories there today.

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Lora Tortolani's curator insight, March 15, 2015 8:47 PM

It is interesting to see the same trends over and over again.  These maps are a great tool to show the history of the area, as well as the history of religion and political views.  I appreciate the information provided since the Middle East has undergone the most transitions (going all the way back to Mesopotamia) and its history can be confusing. 

Alex Vielman's curator insight, November 23, 2015 3:17 PM

Maps like the ones posted in this article, really helps people to understand and break down deeply of understanding the entire region as a whole. Visualization is very important in geography when trying to understand the region people are talking about. this region as goes down to the Mesopotamia Era. It is important to know, how the culture was in this area to how it differentiated during the Ottoman Empire. During the first couple of maps, we can begin to see the division of the entire region. As you go on, we begin to notice the divisions between people, religion, language between states and in-states. There is so much information to know about the Middle East region and it may be even harder to understand due to the tons of changes and separations, but it is important to understand these divisions like the Sunni's and the Shi'ites in order to fully explain the development and the current situations that are occurring in this region as we speak. 

Matt Ramsdell's curator insight, December 7, 2015 5:18 PM

These 40 maps are a very interesting way of showing how people have traveled around and moved about the Earth from the time of the fertile crescent era to the people of today. It shows us the paths that people have taken to move to a new location. How they used the Meditteranean Sea to move from one side to the other. It also shows how the Tigris and Euphrates came together to form a smaller area of the Persian gulf. This led to smalled economic growth because now there is less land for imports and exports.

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Local Population Pyramids

Local Population Pyramids | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

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Mrs. Karnowski's curator insight, August 27, 2014 7:13 AM

1G Theme 2: 6 Billion people and me

CT Blake's curator insight, August 29, 2014 8:27 PM

Useful for explaining population pyramids.

Sarah Ann Glesenkamp's curator insight, September 16, 2014 12:08 PM

Unit 2

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The Godfather of Digital Maps

The Godfather of Digital Maps | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
Nearly 50 years ago, Jack Dangermond started digital mapping pioneer Esri, and its work made Google Maps and Google Earth possible.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 11, 12:32 PM

Two resources on pioneers in GIS. 

  • This is a nice article on the beginnings of ESRI and Jack Dangermond's impact on digital mapping.  
  • Here is a video about Roger Tomlinson, 'father of GIS.'

 

Tags: GIS, ESRI, mapping, cartography, geospatial.

YEC Geo's curator insight, February 12, 11:37 AM

It's no exaggeration to say that digital mapping is oen of the most powerful advancements in geoscience in the twentieth century.

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Which NFL Team Are You Stuck Watching Every Sunday?

Which NFL Team Are You Stuck Watching Every Sunday? | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
Like millions of other Americans, I watch the NFL on a regular basis. However, just like millions of other viewers, most Sundays I am not sure which games will be on my television. For years, the strange geographic structures that underpinned league broadcasts were almost entirely obscured from the average consumer. People would turn on their TVs expecting to see one game only to be disappointed by another.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 16, 2015 1:25 PM

The top map is essentially a major market analysis of sports teams and shows to some extent the media hinterlands of America's major cities.  The second map I find even more interesting; all teams are regional, but a select few have larger national followings (if you are a fan of the Packers, Steelers, 49ers or Cowboys and are not from those areas, maybe I can guess your age).  There are many other maps in this interesting sports geography article.  What patterns do you see?  Explanations? 


Tag: sportspatialmapping, regions.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, October 20, 2015 11:31 AM

unit 1 and 6

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Why Mercator for the Web? Isn’t the Mercator bad?

Why Mercator for the Web? Isn’t the Mercator bad? | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

"As you may know, Google Maps uses the Mercator projection. So do other Web mapping services, such as Bing Maps and MapQuest. Over the years I’ve encountered antipathy toward the use of the Web Mercator from map projection people. I know of two distinct schools of opposition. One school, consisting of cartographic folks and map aficionados, thinks the Mercator projection is 'bad': The projection misrepresents relative sizes across the globe and cannot even show the poles, they are so inflated. The other school, consisting of geodesy folks, thinks mapping services have corrupted the Mercator projection, whether by using the wrong formulæ for it or by using the wrong coordinate system for it."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 30, 2015 8:41 AM

In this article you will find a thoughtful discussion of the reasons why the Mercator projection is disliked by many, but still so prevalent.  In ArcGIS online, you can Search For Groups and then enter Projected Basemaps to see many map projections on that platform. For more resources on understanding map projections, click here


Tags: mapping, visualization, map projections, cartography, perspective, unit 1 Geoprinciples.

Luis Cesar Nunes's curator insight, October 7, 2015 7:42 AM

Mercaror ArcGis

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Map Projection Transitions

Map Projection Transitions | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

"In some ways, all 2D maps of Earth are interrupted at some point, even if it’s just along the antimeridian at 180°. Interruptions are often in areas of less interest e.g. oceans for a land-focused map."


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Lilydale High School's curator insight, September 3, 2015 6:01 AM

New ways to see the world.

Luis Cesar Nunes's curator insight, September 3, 2015 10:33 AM

map projections

Alex Smiga's curator insight, September 7, 2015 4:23 PM
Seth Dixon's insight:

No screenshot could do justice to this animation.  It transforms a map of the world from one map projection to another, and in the 5 second interval it 'spins the globe' to give you a sense of the the spatial distortions inherent in all projections.  This is but one of the many visualizations fromJason Davies mapping project.   

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How Maps Are Saving the World

How Maps Are Saving the World | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
Maps. They’ve been around longer than photographs. They’ve defined empires,guided explorers, told stories, and captured the imagination of many a hopeful traveler for years. While most appreciate the beauty and power of a good map, few recognize the dynamic and vital applications they have today.


Tags:  mapping, 201, edtech, cartography.


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Gender equity in sports

Gender equity in sports | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

"Yesterday the United States Women’s Soccer Team defeated Japan 5-2 in the FIFA Women’s World Cup Final in Vancouver, claiming their third world title. The event was watched by soccer fans around the country, and was called a “ratings knockout” but couldn't come close to those drawn by men’s soccer in Brazil last summer...while some states have made great strides in reducing this gender gap, others still have great inequity that needs to be addressed to effectively celebrate and give potential American female athletes the opportunities they deserve to succeed."

 

Tags: sport, gender, popular culture, mapping, regions, the South, culture.


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Alexander Yakovlev's comment, July 8, 2015 10:08 AM
This article talks about how not many men are interested in watching women’s sport. I think gender inequity is a major problem in general, not only in sports. Police officers are mostly men as well, as well as many high ranked jobs. We just need to keep working on it as a nation and think that the women who are being discriminated are women of our nation.
Rob Duke's comment, July 9, 2015 1:42 AM
Alex, I worked for a Chief that allowed job sharing, so that women officers who wanted to do so could share a job with both getting benefits, but only working part-time in order to have more time with family. It was a great way to improve the ratio of male to female officers.
Cultural Infusion's curator insight, August 24, 2015 10:13 PM

An important issue of our time is the gap between women and men not only in pay and workplace equality but sports and athletics also. With such a huge presence of many strong, dominate female sporting teams, the question needs to be asked, what more can we do to give these women the recognition and respect of which they deserve?

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Bad Maps Are Everywhere These Days. Here's How to Avoid Being Fooled

Bad Maps Are Everywhere These Days. Here's How to Avoid Being Fooled | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
Tips from a geographer who's seen it all.


Tags:  mapping, cartography, 201, perspective, map.


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lackingingot's comment, June 30, 2015 2:58 AM
Excellent...!!
Kevin Barker's curator insight, June 30, 2015 10:35 AM

Excellent article with examples for exploring the ways in which maps can fail or mislead us.  This is particularly important considering how easily maps can be created by anyone through the availability of digital resources.

Angus Henderson's curator insight, July 2, 2015 2:04 AM

A mapping 'take-down' of great detail, with lots of of interesting linked examples

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Mapping World Religions


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Elle Reagan's curator insight, March 22, 2015 3:17 PM

This was a nice video of good length that allowed me to see how the world is broke up into different regions. I know that religion is a main factor of how places are divided and so I thought this video was a nice visualization of that. The map with the timeline was nice to have and I liked how it gave us an estimate of how many people are following each religion today. The video also helped me see how religion can be a main factor in defining world regions.

Jacqueline Garcia pd1's curator insight, March 22, 2015 3:26 PM

In this video we are able to see the growth and fall of religions. It was quite fascinating to see the number of people in each religion and where in the world the spread. I thought it was helpful to see the dates of events that either caused spread or destruction of religions . For example the birth of Muhammad and the Crusades. THis shows the spatial distribution of religion. 

Ryan Tibari's curator insight, May 27, 2015 9:58 AM

This video puts world religions in a more basic form. Shows the patterns that religions take on a global scale, outlining the most prominent and least prominent throughout the world. 

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How Many Flyover States Does It Take to Equal One New York City?

How Many Flyover States Does It Take to Equal One New York City? | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

"Don’t let my New York City–centric comparisons hinder your imagination. The interactive at the top of this page lets you visualize how different parts of the country compare in population density.

Click the button at the bottom of the interactive to select Los Angeles County, for instance, and then click anywhere on the map to generate a (roughly) circular region of (roughly) equal population. The population data come from the 2010 census, and the square mileage was calculated by summing each highlighted county’s total area. You can also use New Jersey (the most densely populated state), Wyoming (the least densely populated state outside of Alaska), Texas, the coasts (the group of all counties that come within 35 miles of either the Atlantic or Pacific oceans), and, yes, New York City as the baseline for your population comparison."

 

Tags: cartography, mapping, visualization, urban, density.


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Andrew Stoops's curator insight, October 13, 2014 10:16 PM

This map is interesting in that flyover states is something that is not easily defined, at least by me. You could argue that no state is a flyover state because of the industry and businesses within the state itself. I am also curious to know why so few folks live in these areas as I have been to most of these places and they have the social and environmental pull factors important to migration.

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What Does Earth Look Like?


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MsPerry's curator insight, September 1, 2014 9:51 AM

APHG-Unit 1

Lindley Amarantos's curator insight, September 5, 2014 9:18 AM

Mapping and Satellite Imagery

Alex Smiga's curator insight, September 7, 2015 4:29 PM
Seth Dixon's insight:

This video covers various topics important to mapping and satellite imagery (and alesson from an APHG teacher on how to use this video with other resources).  There is so much more to the world and space than what we can see see.  Chromoscope, referenced in the video, simulates other forms of energy on the electromagnetic spectrum besides just visible light.  This type of information is at the core of the science behind all of our satellite imagery.  This video also covers many map projection issues and highlights online resources to understand map distortion including:

Google’s Mercator Map PuzzleJason Davies’ interactive map projection websiteInteractive Gnomonic Projectionand the military's live rendering of what the Earth looks like right now.  
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Cartographic Anomalies: How Map Projections Have Shaped Our Perceptions of the World

Cartographic Anomalies: How Map Projections Have Shaped Our Perceptions of the World | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

Elizabeth Borneman explores how cartography and cartographic projections help and hinder our perception of the world.

"How do you think the world (starting with our perceptions) could change if the map looked differently? What if Australia was on top and the hemispheres switched? By changing how we look at a map we truly can begin to explore and change our assumptions about the world we live in."

 

Geography doesn’t just teach us about the Earth; it provides ways for thinking about the Earth that shapes how we see the world.  Maps do the same; they represent a version of reality and that influences how we think about places. 

 

Tags: mapping, perspective.


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Mrs. B's curator insight, September 22, 2014 7:02 AM

Unit 1 !!!!

 

samantha benitez's curator insight, November 22, 2014 2:53 PM

helps show the different perspectives of our world and how it has changed. also shows many different forms of mapping our world throughout time.

Emily Coats's curator insight, May 27, 2015 10:34 AM

UNIT 1 

This article discusses map projections and how they shape our perception of the world. Maps influence how we see the world, and could change the way we see it as well. These projections show us many different views of the Earth, which is very influential to our perspectives. This applies to unit 1 and its major concepts and underlying geographical perspective such as analyzing maps. 

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40 Maps That Explain The Middle East

40 Maps That Explain The Middle East | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
These maps are crucial for understanding the region's history, its present, and some of the most important stories there today.

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Lora Tortolani's curator insight, March 15, 2015 8:47 PM

It is interesting to see the same trends over and over again.  These maps are a great tool to show the history of the area, as well as the history of religion and political views.  I appreciate the information provided since the Middle East has undergone the most transitions (going all the way back to Mesopotamia) and its history can be confusing. 

Alex Vielman's curator insight, November 23, 2015 3:17 PM

Maps like the ones posted in this article, really helps people to understand and break down deeply of understanding the entire region as a whole. Visualization is very important in geography when trying to understand the region people are talking about. this region as goes down to the Mesopotamia Era. It is important to know, how the culture was in this area to how it differentiated during the Ottoman Empire. During the first couple of maps, we can begin to see the division of the entire region. As you go on, we begin to notice the divisions between people, religion, language between states and in-states. There is so much information to know about the Middle East region and it may be even harder to understand due to the tons of changes and separations, but it is important to understand these divisions like the Sunni's and the Shi'ites in order to fully explain the development and the current situations that are occurring in this region as we speak. 

Matt Ramsdell's curator insight, December 7, 2015 5:18 PM

These 40 maps are a very interesting way of showing how people have traveled around and moved about the Earth from the time of the fertile crescent era to the people of today. It shows us the paths that people have taken to move to a new location. How they used the Meditteranean Sea to move from one side to the other. It also shows how the Tigris and Euphrates came together to form a smaller area of the Persian gulf. This led to smalled economic growth because now there is less land for imports and exports.