FCHS AP HUMAN GEO...
Follow
Find tag "industry"
5.7K views | +0 today
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by FCHSAPGEO from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Inequality and the Gini Coefficient

Inequality and the Gini Coefficient | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
Think everyone should just pull themselves up by their bootstraps? Try this one on for size.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Heidi Hutchison's curator insight, October 12, 2013 10:46 AM

Just incredibly awesome, but so, so sadly true.

Ms. Harrington's curator insight, October 12, 2013 12:00 PM

Educating in poverty

Alison D. Gilbert's curator insight, October 16, 2013 4:47 AM

Do you find this information surprising?

Rescooped by FCHSAPGEO from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Hot Commodities

Hot Commodities | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

"77 Photos of the mass production of the Earth's natural resources.  In the picture above, a Tibetan villager works in a salt field. Salt has been the most common food preservative, especially for meat, for thousands of years." 

Tags: consumption, agriculture, resources, labor, industry, economic, unit 6 industry.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 24, 2013 3:55 PM

Coal, steel, gold, iron, copper, aluminum and oil are all incredibly important commodities.  Agricultural products such as rice, cotton, corn, wheat and coffee all travel far beyond their area of origin.   Where do these resources come from?  How are they produced?  This gallery of 77 pictures is a fantastic tour of the resources that are key cogs in the global economy.  

Lauren Jacquez's curator insight, February 24, 2013 7:55 PM

Just in time for Industry!

Adrian Bahan (MNPS)'s curator insight, March 7, 2013 5:52 PM

intensive or extensive agriculture? Why?

Rescooped by FCHSAPGEO from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

How Wal-Mart Used Payoffs to Get Its Way in Mexico

How Wal-Mart Used Payoffs to Get Its Way in Mexico | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
Wal-Mart de Mexico was an aggressive and creative corrupter, offering large payoffs to get what the law otherwise prohibited, an examination by The New York Times found.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Jessica Rieman's curator insight, February 4, 9:36 AM

Some reactions that I had about this article were that the corporate Walmart took steps in order to enforce their way into the new making of a Walmart store in Mexico. Some things I would ask would be are what regualtions would the Mexican people know to follow in realation to the fact that Walmart had broken rules in order to expand their monopoly.

Paige Therien's curator insight, February 6, 12:33 PM

Wal-Mart is sometimes considered to be the embodiment of globalization.  Unfortunately, these things  come at the cost of not only the quality of life of many people, but also at the cost of these people's culture itself.  This is especially sad in Teotihuacon, where the tourism that is brought by the ruins helps support locals small businesses (their livelihood).  As the article states, and which has been seen wherever a Wal-mart pops up, these small, local business get shut-out quickly.  According to the evidence, it seems as though most of Wal-Mart de Mexico's stores were established through bribery.  With such a huge corporation showing such sure signs of corruption, what else in Mexico is made possible through bribery?

Jess Deady's curator insight, April 24, 1:58 PM

Walmart is a huge, huge, huge corporation. Does anyone really think they wouldn't bribe tons of Mexican cities to change their maps to put their stores into place? With Walmart's calculations of how well their stores would do in the Mexican societies, why not? Although Walmart's sly business is shameful and corruptive, is it so hard to believe they did this?

Rescooped by FCHSAPGEO from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

The No Good, Very Bad Outlook for the Working-Class American Man

The No Good, Very Bad Outlook for the Working-Class American Man | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

The U.S. economy once worked like a finely meshed machine. That is not true anymore. The U.S. economy is still a powerful engine, but workers aren’t seeing the benefits, less-educated men are struggling, and the rich have disconnected from everyone else.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, December 16, 2012 12:39 PM

The problems with the economy are not universally spread throughout society.  Certain segments are impacted more than others by the current struggles, especially when with look at axes of identity, such as class, gender and ethnicity.  While planning on a blue-collar job in the 1950s could have been a solid career plan for a young man in the United States, not so in the 21st century.     


Tags: labor, gender, class, industry, education.

Rescooped by FCHSAPGEO from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Globalization

The world is becoming more and more interconnected. Globalization changes how people consume, work and live almost everywhere on the world. Today, many economic, political, cultural or ecological relationships are not explainable from a national perspective. At the same time, a controversial debate about the consequences of globalization has begun.

 

Questions to ponder: What are the driving forces behind globalization? What areas are most impacted by globalization?  How does globalization benefit some, and adversely impact others? Why?

 

Tags: Globalization, economic, industry, NGOs, political, scale, unit 6 industry.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Kyle Toner's comment, September 10, 2012 9:31 AM
Globalization is an overall positive drive. In time globalization needs to mold developing countries who are in need of a better political and economical system
Sheyna Vargas's comment, September 10, 2012 10:16 AM
After watching this video, it is becoming clear that Globalization isn't just one-sided. While making it easier to connect with people all around the world and lowering costs for businesses, it is also causing harm to less developed countries. The question that pops into my head is, "Does the ends justify the means?" One could argue either point.
First, Globalization has made the world a "smaller" place. Not only is it easier to communicate with one another on different sides of the world but it’s also easier and cheaper to transport goods across nations and bodies of water. These are obviously benefits to both the developed countries and lesser developed countries in getting goods in timely fashions and producing jobs in both areas. Globalization also creates competition amongst developing nations to learn or advance in new skills to bring and/or keep jobs in their country/area.
On the other hand, Globalization is also wreaking havoc on cultural diversity around the global with Western music, food, and products becoming more available. Western culture is basically looked upon as the “money making” culture. Globalization, by creating competition is also harming local business in newly developing countries. This drives the prices down for the local businesses and makes them work for less.
Maricarmen Husson's curator insight, May 3, 2013 8:39 AM

Globalización Globalization

Rescooped by FCHSAPGEO from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Recycling Steel

Steel is strong, versatile and 100% recyclable. Learn how old steel shipping containers are given a new lease on life as liveable spaces.

 

Reusing resources is a critical part of sustainability.  This video looks at the recycling of steel including the creating of container homes.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by FCHSAPGEO from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Ten Ways Walmart Changed the World

Ten Ways Walmart Changed the World | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
On July 2, 1962 -- 50 years ago today -- Sam Walton opened the very first Walmart store in Rogers, Arkansas.

 

The Walmart business model has profoundly reshaped the economic paradigm of retail these has 50 years.  Walmart is commonly cited as a business that exemplifies the processes of globalization.  How has Walmart reshaped aspects of society such as industrial production, environmental standards, labor, urban shopping locations, the outsourcing of manufacturing and consumption? 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Jordan Simon's comment, August 17, 2012 9:12 AM
It is crazy to think that one store could change the world but this one has. Their effective ways of selling and buying products have made this store very well known. Walmart has more than 140 millions customers shop a week which is very impressive. Without Walmart where would we be?
Rj Ocampo's comment, August 24, 2012 4:11 PM
Its amazing to see how far Walmart has come in just 50 years! Sam Walton's philosophy "Always low prices," shaped Walmart to be so successful and could not be the same without it. It's crazy to know that one store could change the globe, I just wonder how much longer Walmart can keep their success going.
Matt Nardone's comment, September 2, 2012 12:19 PM
I have to say that Walmart is my mom's favorite store. I like going there because I know that things are cheaper and I can end up saving money when I get something I need. But I never realized that they put so many small companies out of business trying to make things cheaper for customers. It is a good thing for us but bad for small business guys. What is the right balance?
Rescooped by FCHSAPGEO from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Thinking Green in Pittsburgh

Thinking Green in Pittsburgh | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

"Pittsburgh, called 'hell with the lid taken off' in the 19th century because of its industrial filth, is now an academic leader in the green movement."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Bri Coins's comment, September 12, 2013 4:16 PM
This is awesome! A city coming together to make it a green and better place? Why arent all cities doing this? I remember learning Pittsburgh being one of the dirtiest and industrial based cities, and now to read that its a better place. I think more cities need to come together as they said and stop competing with each other over money and make cities better for the citizens.
Drake Peterson's comment, September 12, 2013 5:06 PM
I think this is an outstanding article. Pittsburgh especially being known for their production of steel and coal, which is very harmful to the atmosphere. But now the city is taking their image and turning it into something green. Which is good for them and good for the world
harish magan's comment, September 14, 2013 1:25 AM
If this city and its governing body can do it any other metro city can also follow suit.Only thing is to take action and act on it. people can ask their respective city council to initiate efforts in this regard . If their citizen also take interest and raise their voice for this concept lot can happen soon.
Rescooped by FCHSAPGEO from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Allentown- Billy Joel

Home-made music video of Billy Joel's "Allentown".

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 4, 2013 1:12 PM

Many teachers use Billy Joel's classic song and music video Allentown as a teaching tool to introduce the topic of deindustrialization in the Rust Belt of the United States.  This alternative music video version adds some useful teaching images to help students contextualize the lyrics.  Another song to consider using is Telegraph Road by Dire Straits; the song follows a town as it industrialized and as it later deindustrialized.  


Tags: labor, industry, economic, unit 6 industry and video.

Nancy Watson's curator insight, January 4, 2013 5:26 PM

Deindustrialization and economic units

Mr Ortloff's curator insight, October 8, 2013 11:35 AM

Billy Joel's classic song and music video Allentown addresses the topic of deindustrialization in the Rust Belt of the United States.  This alternative music video version adds some images to help visualize the lyrics.  Another song that is similar is Telegraph Road by Dire Straits; the song follows a town as it industrialized and as it later deindustrialized.

Rescooped by FCHSAPGEO from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Inside an Amazon Warehouse


Via Seth Dixon
more...
noah taylor's comment, September 12, 2013 5:30 PM
to see something this lsarge and relavent to the world be built by human beings
Kenny Dominguez's curator insight, November 20, 2013 1:07 PM


It is amazing how big this warehouse is. This warehouse must be a couple of acres because amazon is a big company that mostly everyone in the world buys from. it is also amazing how organized they are with all the inventory they get. Amazon is a great company that is helping people gets jobs to help improve there lives and also the economy in which is struggling to get back on it knees. I wonder were amazon has found this warehouse because there are not so many that have this much space. The workers must have golf carts to get around from one spot to the other. Amazon keep up the good work.

 

Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 11, 2013 7:45 AM

Online shopping is a great way to get your holiday gifts or just to regularly shop. By online shopping we do not have to go to the mall and walk around in all these different stores. What most people do not realize is when we online shop our orders are being processed somewhere and it is usually in big warehouse buildings. These buildings require a lot of space to hold all of a stores merchandise. 

Rescooped by FCHSAPGEO from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Outside the Amtrak Window, a Picture of the U.S. Economy

Outside the Amtrak Window, a Picture of the U.S. Economy | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
The death and life of the industrial corridor linking New York and Washington.

 

This article is a great example of analyzing the landscape to observe changes in any given place.  This corridor is home to 8 of the 10 wealthiest counties; at the same time this transportation corridor is also home a half a dozen of the country's most broken cities.  Exploring this area is way to analyze the changing economic geographies of the United States.  For a visual representation of these same themes, see this 5 minute video that corresponds to this NY Times magazine article. 

 

Tags: industry, economy, unit 6 industy, transportation, neighborhood, landscape.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Don Brown Jr's comment, November 20, 2012 9:06 AM
I can’t help but think of Rhode Island, specifically communities in Providence and how the decline of the textile industry and rise of the automobile has affected the contrast in standards of living and opportunities between the residents of the East Side and South Providence.
Rescooped by FCHSAPGEO from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Globalization

The world is becoming more and more interconnected. Globalization changes how people consume, work and live almost everywhere on the world. Today, many economic, political, cultural or ecological relationships are not explainable from a national perspective. At the same time, a controversial debate about the consequences of globalization has begun.

 

Questions to ponder: What are the driving forces behind globalization? What areas are most impacted by globalization?  How does globalization benefit some, and adversely impact others? Why?

 

Tags: Globalization, economic, industry, NGOs, political, scale, unit 6 industry.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Kyle Toner's comment, September 10, 2012 9:31 AM
Globalization is an overall positive drive. In time globalization needs to mold developing countries who are in need of a better political and economical system
Sheyna Vargas's comment, September 10, 2012 10:16 AM
After watching this video, it is becoming clear that Globalization isn't just one-sided. While making it easier to connect with people all around the world and lowering costs for businesses, it is also causing harm to less developed countries. The question that pops into my head is, "Does the ends justify the means?" One could argue either point.
First, Globalization has made the world a "smaller" place. Not only is it easier to communicate with one another on different sides of the world but it’s also easier and cheaper to transport goods across nations and bodies of water. These are obviously benefits to both the developed countries and lesser developed countries in getting goods in timely fashions and producing jobs in both areas. Globalization also creates competition amongst developing nations to learn or advance in new skills to bring and/or keep jobs in their country/area.
On the other hand, Globalization is also wreaking havoc on cultural diversity around the global with Western music, food, and products becoming more available. Western culture is basically looked upon as the “money making” culture. Globalization, by creating competition is also harming local business in newly developing countries. This drives the prices down for the local businesses and makes them work for less.
Maricarmen Husson's curator insight, May 3, 2013 8:39 AM

Globalización Globalization

Rescooped by FCHSAPGEO from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Mexico's 'maquiladora' labor system keeps workers in poverty

Mexico's 'maquiladora' labor system keeps workers in poverty | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

"Some four decades after welcoming foreign assembly plants and factories, known as maquiladoras, Mexico has seen only a trickle of its industrial and factory workers join the ranks of those who even slightly resemble a middle class." 

 

Despite making such consumer goods like BlackBerry smartphones, plasma TVs, appliances and cars that most people in the US, for instance, consider necessities, Mexican workers in these factories seldom get to enjoy these items because, as this article argues, the labor system keeps them in poverty.  Foreign investment in these businesses keep unions out and attracts workers from poorer areas, allowing low-cost labor to prevail.  Less than $8 a day is the going wage - great for the bottom line and consumer prices but very bleak for those who toil in this system.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
JeanneSilvey's curator insight, November 9, 2013 8:40 AM

What still needs to change?

Olga Varlamov's curator insight, November 23, 2013 5:26 PM

This article talks about how the maquiladora labor system dosen't provide enough money for it's workers. Many in Mexico are living in poverty and can't afford much more than dinner because of their low wages.

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, February 4, 9:47 AM

The labor system keeps workers in Poverty. This is the argument that is transitioned by stating the fact that many factory workers are and will always remian in poverty if they have no oppurtunity to move up in the food chain and become educated in order to get themselves out of poverty. They need different skills in order to aquire a better job to create a better life.  

Rescooped by FCHSAPGEO from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Ultimate factories: Coca Cola

nat geo programme about the coke factory and the manufacturing process of coke...

 

Where is Coca Cola produced?  Some products are bulk losing some are bulk gaining in the manufacturing process.  Coca Cola and their containers represent bulk gaining products.  Although not the focus of this video, what is the geography behind where these factories are located?  How would this geographic pattern change if this were are bulk losing industry?  What are examples of bulk gaining and bulk losing industries?  Why are glass bottles not manufactured in the United States? 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Kamaryn Hunt's comment, October 7, 2013 3:32 PM
As consumers, we never pay THAT much attention to how theproduct is manufactured, but only what's in it. Seeing this vide makes me wonder how many other well-known products are manufactured??
megan b clement's curator insight, October 31, 2013 8:40 AM

"The video displays the maufacturing and distribution of the Coca Cola product globally. Goal is to put Coke in all hands and they need ultimate factories for distribution. For non-alcoholic beverage market Coke is number 1. They produce 800 servings a day and Coke does about 670 billion dollars in sales a year. There recipe is the best kept secret, they use words like natural flavors that help keep the recipe a secret. Logistics, cheap labor, and cheap transportation are key to maximize every dollar. "

Denise Pacheco's curator insight, December 17, 2013 9:57 AM

I can't believe how much money this company makes in a single year. The people in this country must have some serious kidney stones lol. But on a serious note, this company definately has a good strategy on how to minimize cost transportation, because to transport 4.5 million servings that Coca Col makes in a single day, let alone, a year, must be quite expensive and time consuming. Not to mention that they distribute their products in 206 countries, they legit serve 99% of mankind. No wonder they make $670 Billion.