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What Does Earth Look Like?


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Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, August 27, 12:37 PM

Unit 1

MsPerry's curator insight, September 1, 9:51 AM

APHG-Unit 1

Lindley Amarantos's curator insight, September 5, 9:18 AM

Mapping and Satellite Imagery

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Gallery: What inequality looks like

Gallery: What inequality looks like | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
Artists, designers, photographers and activists share one image that encapsulates what inequality means to them.

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Mirta Liliana Filgueira's curator insight, June 16, 9:28 AM

Galería de Imágenes acerca de la desigualdad como consecuencia de la pobreza.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, June 17, 9:32 AM

powerful images that define unit 6!

Rianne Tolsma's curator insight, June 18, 7:07 AM

add your insight...

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Changes on the Cape Cod Coastline

Changes on the Cape Cod Coastline | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
Beaches are dynamic, living landscapes. The coast off of Chatham, Massachusetts, provides a prime example of beach evolution.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 5, 11:52 PM

To quote coastal geologist Robert Oldale, "Many people view coastal erosion as a problem that needs to be addressed and, if possible, prevented.  However, storm and wave erosion along the shore of Cape Cod has been going on for thousands of years and will likely continue for thousands of years more. It is a natural process that allows the Cape to adjust to rising sea level. Erosion is only a peril to property. If we build on the shore, we must accept the fact that sooner or later coastal erosion will take the property away.”


Tagscoastal, remote sensing, mappingerosion, landscape.

Miroslav Sopko's curator insight, June 7, 1:16 PM
Všetko sa mení...
Sam Burden's curator insight, June 16, 7:40 AM

The NASA Earth Observatory is a teaching tool used to assist educators in teaching students about the environmental, including natural hazards with visualizations depicting the date and time these vast changes in the climate occurs. There are multiple global maps which  depict data over a period of time which can be used as a tool to see the effects of global warming it’s the implications on the environment on a global scale. Animations, videos and side by side images are also available to teachers to show how sustainable choices or designs can influence our environment. I really enjoyed looking at all of the real-world images on this site and it opened my eyes to how creating a more sustainable environment could influence our world on a global scale. 

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Cultural Syncretism

Cultural Syncretism | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, December 8, 2013 8:39 AM

I found this image on social media from a great geography teacher (link to his site--looking for APHG group activities?  Try this).  This picture taken at the Jewish Community Center (JCC) in Memphis, TN shows an intrguing linguistic combination that I had never imagined before.  This is referred to as cultural syncretism, where two or more cultures or cultural traits combine together to make something new.  Globalization and migration are making more cultural combinations than we've ever seen before in this human mosaic we call home.


Tags: language, culture, the South, APHG, religion, landscape.

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, December 11, 2013 12:01 AM

Interesting 


Lauren Sellers's curator insight, May 28, 11:02 PM

This was taken in Memphis, TN. I liked how it mixes the religion with the surrounding culture and dialect, really interesting and shows that people can have the same religion and different backgrounds. 

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Humour in the steppes of Mongolia

Humour in the steppes of Mongolia | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
I can´t stop smiling from a photo I stumbled upon on the facebook page of Nomaden (a Norwegian travel store) – I just love it! I tried to find the source of the photo, but no luck. I found it sprea...

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 18, 2013 12:39 PM

I think this is my new litmus test for potential friends.  If this picture from Mongolia doesn't bring a smile to your face, I just don't think that we can be friends.  If anyone can find the original source (or a hi-res version), I'd love to hear about it.  

chris tobin's comment, February 21, 2013 1:33 PM
Great happy photo. This is a possible National Geographgic photo
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Flag Food

Flag Food | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

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dilaycock's curator insight, February 4, 2013 10:02 PM

Now here's an interesting activity for students!

Mark Slusher's curator insight, February 9, 2013 8:46 AM

Now THIS is geographical food for thought! Talk about conquering a nation!

Emily Larsson's comment, September 10, 2013 8:15 PM
I love that! It's so creative. Whoever came up with the idea to do this as an advertisement for the international food festival did a great job. They all look so delicious. Food festivals are a great way to experience other cultures.
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NatGeo on Instagram

NatGeo on Instagram | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

I'm not a photographer, so Instagram isn't one on of my preferred social media platforms.  However, since National Geographic is world renowned for their images, this is a perfect outlet to share more images that wouldn't fit into their articles or other collections.  According to their Social Media expert, this foggy image of NYC is their most viewed image on Instagram. 


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Ingrid Dabringer’s Map Paintings: Finding Whimsy in Geography

Ingrid Dabringer’s Map Paintings: Finding Whimsy in Geography | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

This is a great gallery of clever artwork that puts the "art" in cartography (The Earth without art is just "eh"). 


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The True Size Of Africa

The True Size Of Africa | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

This is another old classic image that I might have shared earlier but it merits repeating. As Salvatore Natoli (a leader in geography education) once said, "In our society we unconsciously equate size with importance and even power." This is one reason why many people have underestimated the true size of Africa relative to places that they view as more important or more powerful.


Tags: mapping, Africa, perspective, images. 


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Ricardo Salaya Monsell's comment, November 5, 2012 1:31 PM
Although I do not think they do to "trick", it is true that confuses many people and makes them believe in a world disproportionate. (Apologies for my terrible google-English)
Laurence Cuffe's curator insight, August 1, 2013 4:46 AM

While size is not every thing, and Ireland seems to have returned to the UK, This is an image worth discusing in Class.

Afrikasources's curator insight, January 15, 10:10 AM

Just a reminder

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Ramadan 2012 begins

Ramadan 2012 begins | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
All over the world Muslims have begun their holiest month of the year by fasting from dawn until dusk each day, broken each evening by large, communal meals.

 

This photoessay is a visual and cultural delight.  Pictured above is a Pakistani boy who prays next to plates of fruits donated to worshippers to break their fast (Karachi, July 21, 2012).  On the first day of the holy fasting month of Ramadan, we see the communal ethos of Ramadan.


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Valentia Pollard's comment, September 4, 2012 7:15 PM
The fact that over 1 billion Muslims take part in Ramadan is incredible. My dad is apart of Ramadan and was telling me all about it. Its amazing how dedicated they are to their religion.
David Sanchez's comment, September 5, 2012 8:08 PM
It's amazing that so many people can be so dedicated to their religion, even if it means fasting for such a long period of time.
Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, March 26, 3:32 PM

Ramadan is such a sacred holy month for Muslims. It is a crucial time for holiness and togetherness. Muslims fast, pray, and eat at evening breaking the fasts. It is a celebration that is taken very seriously, but can still incorporate in some fun with fireworks.

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Artful, Aerial Views of Humanity's Impact

Artful, Aerial Views of Humanity's Impact | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
Using aerial photographs that render imperiled landscapes almost abstract, Edward Burtynsky explores the consequences of human activity bearing down on the earth’s resources.

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Diane Johnson's curator insight, August 11, 8:12 AM

These images may be very useful for teaching the DCI's under the Human Impact topic.

Alexandra Piggott's curator insight, August 11, 6:48 PM

Is this evidence of homgeniziation of landscapes?

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, August 11, 8:11 PM

People change landscapes. This is a great resource available as an iPad App also Called Burtynsky Water. 

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Stunning Photos Of Earth From Above Will Change Your Outlook Of The Planet

Stunning Photos Of Earth From Above Will Change Your Outlook Of The Planet | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
This daily dose of satellite photos helps you appreciate the beauty and intricacy of the things humans have constructed--as well as the devastating...

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Lola Ripollés's curator insight, June 15, 8:58 AM

Amazing.

Diane Johnson's curator insight, June 15, 11:19 AM

Great images for giving students a global perspective.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, June 17, 9:33 AM

unit 1

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Aerial housing photographs show stark division between rich and poor in Mexico

Aerial housing photographs show stark division between rich and poor in Mexico | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
A new advertising campaign is seeking to draw attention to the gap between the wealthy and the poverty-stricken in Mexico by showing how they co-exist in disturbingly close proximity.

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Clarissa Rangel's curator insight, May 28, 8:49 PM

Interesting look at the social mobility of a super-urban area. 

Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's curator insight, May 29, 12:26 PM

An advertising campaign hopes to show the differences of income and living standards between neighborhoods in Mexico.

The place of these areas are so vastly different as well as there interactions as the lower class makes shanty architecture and the upper class develops large condos and buildings just for residence.

Ms. Harrington's curator insight, June 17, 8:35 AM

And again in Brazil

http://civitasinclusive.wordpress.com/2013/03/16/paraisopolis-brazil-by-tuca-vieira-2004/

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Meandering Stream

Meandering Stream | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

"I'm used to rivers that know what they're doing."


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Hoffman's comment, September 14, 2013 1:32 PM
hmm, looks like some river had a little to much
Peter Phillips's comment, October 5, 2013 7:31 PM
All rivers move. Those that have a wide, flat basin meander most. Those meanders can be even more dramatic than in this image, snaking 10's of kilometres sideways over time. Combine this action with geological upheaval and it gets even more interesting. Check out images of the Murray River in Australia from space.
Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, December 6, 2013 11:34 AM

Lol... the first words that went through my head were h--- (heck) yeah.  David Bowie... sung by an astronaut... okay, back to Geography. I thought that the rivers reminded me of something I thought of during the talk in class about lava rock being changed into other kinds of rocks over time, and cycling around.  I thought on a larger scale, about this universe, and I have read before that people are studying different areas of space-time fabrics, trying to find origins of the Universe, and answers to other existential questions.  I suppose that if one could trace patterns of rivers, and if one could trace patterns of rocks, to find where they came from, and why/how they came where they came, then by examining the (assumedly tattered and marked) fabrics of space and time, people would be able to determine origins of everything from the beginning of what existed before all universes, and also the origins of life forms.  I enjoyed the movie Prometheus, which was directed by Sir Ridley Scott, and I had to say that I thought that the messages found on rocks in caves, as a catalyst that lead the cast to go visit an alien world that had something to do with human origins, could be very literally taken.  If there are clues in rocks, why wouldn't there be other clues, possibly in celluar components of life forms, or space and time?  Applying the idea of studying rocks and rivers and other physical geographical pursuits to the idea of applying it on a gigantic scale greatly appeals to me.  I believe that humans will find some answers that way, but I hadn't directly realized just that until we mentioned some stuff about physical geography, and glacial forces carrying and spreading out rocks, and deposits and erosion.  After all, the Milky Way has origins, so why believe that we came from the Milky Way, rather than beyond?

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Humour in the steppes of Mongolia

Humour in the steppes of Mongolia | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
I can´t stop smiling from a photo I stumbled upon on the facebook page of Nomaden (a Norwegian travel store) – I just love it! I tried to find the source of the photo, but no luck. I found it sprea...

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 18, 2013 12:39 PM

I think this is my new litmus test for potential friends.  If this picture from Mongolia doesn't bring a smile to your face, I just don't think that we can be friends.  If anyone can find the original source (or a hi-res version), I'd love to hear about it.  

chris tobin's comment, February 21, 2013 1:33 PM
Great happy photo. This is a possible National Geographgic photo
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Inside an Amazon Warehouse


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noah taylor's comment, September 12, 2013 8:30 PM
to see something this lsarge and relavent to the world be built by human beings
Kenny Dominguez's curator insight, November 20, 2013 4:07 PM


It is amazing how big this warehouse is. This warehouse must be a couple of acres because amazon is a big company that mostly everyone in the world buys from. it is also amazing how organized they are with all the inventory they get. Amazon is a great company that is helping people gets jobs to help improve there lives and also the economy in which is struggling to get back on it knees. I wonder were amazon has found this warehouse because there are not so many that have this much space. The workers must have golf carts to get around from one spot to the other. Amazon keep up the good work.

 

Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 11, 2013 10:45 AM

Online shopping is a great way to get your holiday gifts or just to regularly shop. By online shopping we do not have to go to the mall and walk around in all these different stores. What most people do not realize is when we online shop our orders are being processed somewhere and it is usually in big warehouse buildings. These buildings require a lot of space to hold all of a stores merchandise. 

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Life in Chechnya

Life in Chechnya | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
Photojournalist Diana Markosian spent the last year and half covering Russia's volatile North Caucasus region.

 

These 33 photos are arranged to tell the cultural story of life in Chechnya, especially the life of young women coming of age in the aftermath of the war.  As the architecture of this mosque suggests, the influence of traditional Islamic values and Russian political authority have greatly shaped the lives of the Chechen people.


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Derek Ethier's comment, October 18, 2012 1:28 AM
The way women in Chechnya live is in line with how many Muslim women around the world live. They must cover their bodies and follow proper gender codes. Unfortunately, these girls still have very little power as is the case in many Muslim countries. Overall, it is amazing how many different cultures and ethnicities held inside of Russia.
Marissa Roy's curator insight, November 18, 2013 12:07 PM

I find learning about the young women during the rapid redefiniition of their culture into a Muslim state is of great interest. It is also of interest that the society is meshing traditional Islam  with the Russian way of governing to create a reemerged society.

Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, February 18, 3:24 PM

These pictures show many examples to how life in Chechnya for women is very different for women in the United States. We can see that these woman take part in similar day to day activities, but in very different ways. This is why their lives overall are much different than ours.

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82 iconic world landmarks to visit

82 iconic world landmarks to visit | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
Some buildings and features are so well known they have become icons of place.

 

This is a great collection of important world landmarks including the pictured Potala Palace in the Tibetan city of Lhasa.  Who wouldn't like to see some of these places?   

 

Tags: geo-inspiration, tourism, images.


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Sophia Schroeder's comment, September 1, 2013 8:02 PM
All of these landmarks are beautiful. It's very interesting to see how much culture, especially religion, has shaped these "must see places." Also, I felt like I was traveling through time and got to examine the feats of new architectural eras, though some would debate that architectural works from the past are more outstanding strictly by the means in which they built these masterpieces. It needs to be said (to add to the wonderment of these places) that most of these monuments are built in places where the overall economic status is low; to see things like temples and churches of such great magnitude and beauty built with such craftsmanship, dedication, and money (even though it is scarce) shows how much they rely on their faith. I was also disappointed to see that the two monuments displayed for America, the Lincoln Memorial and the St. Louis Arch, were, in my opinion, not the best picks. Compared to the other landmarks ours feel so mundane, so void of history and culture (maybe, that's because I have grown up seeing them all my life and their meaning and awe has deteriorated to me.) I guess this can be attributed, in part, to the fact that our country is newer and has not yet grown enough to have the rich history including the trials and tribulations in which other countries have had which makes their culture more fascinating and intriguing to me.
Mary Rack's comment, September 2, 2013 12:49 AM
Sophia, Thanks for your very fine comment! I agree with you entirely, and especially about the Lincoln Memorial and St Louis Arch. Better choices might be the Grand Canyon, the Giant Sequoia trees in California, the National Cathedral in DC, or even Mt Rushmore? And some of the ancient cliff dwellings in the Southwest are amazing. Too bad they did not consult us.
Mary Rack's comment, September 2, 2013 12:51 AM
PS ... or the Hoover Dam?
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Scale of the Universe

Scale of the Universe | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
Everything in the known universe, created by 14-year-old twins.

 

After you follow the link, click "Start," and then use the slider across the bottom, or the wheel on your mouse, to zoom in -- and in and in and in... or out and out and out... It will take you from the very smallest features postulated by scientists (the strings in string theory) to the very largest (the observable universe).  This really is a fabulous visual demonstration of scale at micro and macro levels.   This is an excellent way to bring spatial thinking into the math curriculum as well.  See this on the twins website at: http://htwins.net/scale2/


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Kalin B.'s comment, September 13, 2012 8:11 PM
I've seen this around, and it always reminds me of a fictional pair of glasses that would show you what little a part of the universe you are, causing you to go insane.

Erm, anyway.. Very neat.
Zakkary Catera's comment, September 13, 2013 12:55 AM
I like to sit and think about how big we think we are, not as just one countrh but as one planet! We think that we are so so big but looking at this scale of the universe it is interesting to see how much bigger things can get AND how small they can get compared to us. So if you think about it this way, we are SO tiny compared to the rest of the universe and if we stopped doing what we are doing now (i.e wars, sickness and natural resources etc.) and work together we would be SO MUCH bigger and as a result of that we would be able to explore more of our world and universe
Zakkary Catera's comment, September 13, 2013 12:55 AM
I like to sit and think about how big we think we are, not as just one countrh but as one planet! We think that we are so so big but looking at this scale of the universe it is interesting to see how much bigger things can get AND how small they can get compared to us. So if you think about it this way, we are SO tiny compared to the rest of the universe and if we stopped doing what we are doing now (i.e wars, sickness and natural resources etc.) and work together we would be SO MUCH bigger and as a result of that we would be able to explore more of our world and universe
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Why We Travel...

Why We Travel... | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

So go 'read' some more (Extra credit for identifying the location)!


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Morgan Halsey's comment, September 8, 2012 10:13 AM
I really like this quote and it got me thinking. One who does not experience what other places are like can only base life off of what they know. They don't know how blue the water of the Bahamas is or how it feels to stare up at the Eiffel Tower. They haven't been able to see the different cultures of the world and how they act. They only know what they know because of what they've seen in pictures or heard from other people. This does not give them the knowledge that they need about other places.
Kendall Dickson's comment, September 11, 2012 9:21 PM
St. Augustine hit this saying out of the ball park. Sometimes when I try taking picutres of the sky or of a scene, I will delete the picture because it just isnt the same as in realy life. I really think that traveling gives people a reality shock when seeing new phenomena.
Lydia Blevins's comment, September 12, 2012 10:14 PM
What i think this quote means is that you may think you know a lot about the world but until you go and travel to different places you will not fully understand the world. I also think it means that there is so many different things to experience on earth.