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Giving Thanks—or Miigwetch

Giving Thanks—or Miigwetch | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
Gathered around the Thanksgiving table, Americans tell stories about colonists and Native Americans coming together. But do Native Americans even celebrate Thanksgiving? And what would Native American heritage food look like? This November, With Good Reason takes a look at the indigenous side of a Thanksgiving table.

Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 25, 2014 2:12 PM

This podcast is a great look at the diverse ways in which a national holiday can be celebrated.  The cultural connections in the podcast are quite rich.  


Tags: Thanksgiving, food, seasonal, folk culture, culture, indigenous.

JebaQpt's comment, December 1, 2014 11:56 PM
For each new morning with its light,
For rest and shelter of the night,
For health and food, for love and friends,
For everything Thy goodness sends.
~RalphWaldoEmerson http://www.thequotes.net/2011/11/thanksgiving-day-quotes/
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Thanksgiving Resources

Thanksgiving Resources | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

Thanksgiving has some fascinating spatial components to it.  My wife and I prepared an article for the Geography News Network on Maps101.com that shows the historical and geographic context of the first Thanksgiving and in the memorialization of Thanksgiving as a national holiday (if you don’t subscribe to Maps 101, it is also freely available as a podcast on Stitcher Radio or iTunes).


Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 16, 2013 7:52 PM

One of my favorite combinations of maps for Thanksgiving involves the geography of food production and food consumption.  When we start looking at the regional dishes on Thanksgiving plates we can see some great patterns.  This ESRI storymap asks the simple question, where did your Thanksgiving Dinner come From?

 

This StoryMap is a great resource to combine with this New York Times article that shows the regional preferences for the most popular Thanksgiving recipes.  Where are sweet potatoes grown?  Where do people make sweet potato pie for Thanksgiving? 

Plymouth County, MA is heart of only 3 cranberry producing regions and is was also home to the first Thanksgiving.  How has this New England local ecology and traditional food patterns influenced national traditions? 

For these and more Thanksgiving resources on scoop.it, click here.

Tony Aguilar's curator insight, November 17, 2013 6:14 AM

This website is interesting because it gives us the geography of where specific foods in the country are manufactured such as cranberrie sauce, turkeys, sweet potatoes and helps us develop a rich cultural history and earn solidarity of where we come from and the traditions that make us who we are in terms of culinary choices. The original thanksgiving with the early puritan settlers in New England most likely reflected dishes that were synonomous with foods that natives grew and other local items that were family in this area. Now because of industry we to choose foods that have their origin from markets nationwide.

Al Picozzi's curator insight, November 17, 2013 12:35 PM

Love to see where the traditional American Thanksgiving food comes from.  We have that, but growing up in an all Italian household Thanksgivng was more then Turkey...it had an added Italian flavor.  Start with antipasto that had a prosciutto that would met in your mouth, plus cheeses, muhrooms, other meats, then would come the soup, then the pasta, could be any variety then the Turkey, but you would also have a ham because you never knew who was going to stop by, plus all the trimmings and then finally dessert with Italian cookies and pastires along with the Thanksgivng traditions of pumpkin and apple pies.  We took breaks inbetween courses to watch some football and make room for more food becasue it was all good.  We literally ate all day.  So for us out food came form all over the world.  In a nation of immigrants, we added our own flavor to an American Holiday..and to me whats more American than brining in some of your own hertitage into a holiday..we are after all a "melting pot"

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Folk Cultures: Fiddler on the roof

Folk cultures are rural, religious, agricultural, family-based and in a word: traditional.  This classic movie's opening 10 minutes are a good primer for markers of folk cultures and struggles that folk cultures have to maintain there vitality in a globalizing world.  

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City of Endangered Languages

"New York has long been a city of immigrants, but linguists now consider it a laboratory for studying and preserving languages in rapid decline elsewhere in the world."


Via Seth Dixon
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Alexandra Piggott's curator insight, November 4, 2014 4:30 PM

Is globalisation enabling the preservation and study of declining languages?

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, November 5, 2014 7:59 PM

I will be showing this in class DO NOT use it for your scoop it review--

 

unit 3

SRA's curator insight, April 19, 10:30 PM

Victoria Margo



This article really caught my eye because at a young age I was taught to speak spanish and english at the same time, and now that I am older I realize how important it is to know two languages. I will forever be grateful that my parents took the time and made my sisters and I learn something different while growing up.

Languages change over a long period of time and many times languages grow or die within time. Two main vocabulary words that I have not forgotten are Language divergence and Language convergence. Language divergence is the dividing of a language into many new languages. Language convergence is when two languages merge to become one. Both these definitions are extremely important when talking about how some languages will soon be extinct. I believe many languages have been endangered due to families and parents who do not continue speaking their language when they leave their original country/state. Language is very important to our world and society today. As stated from the short video clip, if you do not continue speaking your language then who will? I agree with that completely if you don't practice something over and over again how do you expect to get any better at it? This video was a great way to express the diffusion of languages and how families today still practice their language. This video made me think about and reflect on the video we watched in Geography class a couple weeks back because of the decline of all languages that we may not even be aware of. Many times it is hard to find older people who speak your native language but I also learned from the video we watched in class that it is possible if you are willing to try and continue something that is important to you. There are many different languages that connect to our world. 

I also liked how this article mentioned that New York is the city of immigrants, meaning New York is full of different cultures and unique language. Although this article/video does say that language has been endangered it can definitely be changed with a little knowledge of why this is happening. Geography and language tie in together quite well. I am hoping many languages can be saved for the future. 

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Life in Chechnya

Life in Chechnya | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
Photojournalist Diana Markosian spent the last year and half covering Russia's volatile North Caucasus region.

 

These 33 photos are arranged to tell the cultural story of life in Chechnya, especially the life of young women coming of age in the aftermath of the war.  As the architecture of this mosque suggests, the influence of traditional Islamic values and Russian political authority have greatly shaped the lives of the Chechen people.


Via Seth Dixon, Kelly Reagan
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Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, February 18, 2014 3:24 PM

These pictures show many examples to how life in Chechnya for women is very different for women in the United States. We can see that these woman take part in similar day to day activities, but in very different ways. This is why their lives overall are much different than ours.

Shanelle Zaino's curator insight, October 15, 2014 10:49 PM

The images I was able to see were moving. The image that stands out most were the children in gym class. Young men were able to wear gym like clothing and the girls needed to be covered head to toe wearing dresses.Powerful.I was able to see only a few and the rest seemed to be lightened to the point where you could not see them anymore. The words also seemed to be blocked out. =(

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 8, 2014 12:28 PM

These photos show the culture of Chechnya. I found them very effective at mixing the environmental and cultural aspects of the area in these pictures. The one where two young people are on a date in a barren snow covered park sitting on opposites sides of the bench because close physical contact is forbidden before marriage. Although the school gym shows how women have to be dressed modestly even when they are exercising. 

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Russian Summer

Russian Summer | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
At the dacha, the soul of Russia--and its cultural divide--is on display. In vacation cottages the women are in housedresses. The men, Speedos and rubber boots. They brood, plant, party, and restore their souls.

 

The dacha (a seasonal second home or a vacation spot) is incredibly important in Russia.  It is is estimated that over 50% of city residences in Russia own a dacha as a way to culturally connect with the countryside.  This is a nice glimpse into that life. 


Via Seth Dixon
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Jess Deady's curator insight, May 1, 2014 12:02 PM

This is definitely a part of the country/cultural side of Russia. Bathing with animals and in lakes like this is definitely not a part of urban Russia. Throughout societies, there is always an urge to live a different lifestyle. In this country, the residents are given an option to live both countryside Russian life and urban Russian life.

Kaitlin Young's curator insight, October 27, 2014 9:07 AM

“Everyone in Russia has a dacha story”. Dachas are small, summer cottages and cabins that over half of Russia’s population owns. While many people in the United States have this mental image of Russians as drunk, stern, communists, the dacha shows insight to a life much more similar to ours than many people would probably imagine. Russians use dachas as a form of escape, in the same way that many Americans visit a beach house or a mountain cabin in the summer. The need to escape and break through the rut of the daily grind is something that transcends ethnicity or nationality. The need to leave our concrete jungles for the simplicities and feeling of completeness offered by the natural environment is something much more  primordial.

Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, December 17, 2014 9:12 PM

Everyone in Russia has a dacha story. It may be a trace of childhood memory like playing ball late into evening by a sun that won’t set, gathering pinecones to perfume the fire, or swimming in an icy pond. It may be quietly romantic, a first love that fades with the season or blossoms into marriage. An older woman tells of coming home from work to find her husband in bed with her best friend. She kicked him out and, with retirement looming and no husband, wondered, What will I do now? The answer was the dacha she bought for 500 rubles, with a forest nearby for mushroom hunting, a lake, and a garden. “The dacha saved my life,” she says. Sweet or bitter, lighthearted or dark, the story always takes place in summer. A dacha, after all, is a summer cottage.