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The Godfather of Digital Maps

The Godfather of Digital Maps | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
Nearly 50 years ago, Jack Dangermond started digital mapping pioneer Esri, and its work made Google Maps and Google Earth possible.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 11, 12:32 PM

Two resources on pioneers in GIS. 

  • This is a nice article on the beginnings of ESRI and Jack Dangermond's impact on digital mapping.  
  • Here is a video about Roger Tomlinson, 'father of GIS.'

 

Tags: GIS, ESRI, mapping, cartography, geospatial.

YEC Geo's curator insight, February 12, 11:37 AM

It's no exaggeration to say that digital mapping is oen of the most powerful advancements in geoscience in the twentieth century.

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Santas Around the World

Santas Around the World | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
This story map was created with the Esri Map Tour application in ArcGIS Online.

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Vivica Juarez's comment, January 13, 2014 8:10 PM
This was definitely an interesting reading. I believe @Spencer Levesque had a very good point. They all have similar features, but are different in little ways. And who would of thought someone came on New Years too?
Kate Loy's curator insight, January 13, 2014 10:23 PM

I find it very interesting on how other countries precieve Santa Claus. The history on him, what he looks like, how he gets around, and what they call him. Each country perceives him differently, depending on their culture and history. His clothes, age, language, and personality.

Kate Loy's curator insight, January 13, 2014 10:28 PM

I find it very interesting on how other countries perceive Santa Claus. The history on him, what he looks like, how he gets around, and what they call him. Each country precieves him differently, depending on their culture and history. His clothes, age, language, and personality.

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Great Web Maps


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Speaking the “Language” of Spatial Analysis via Story Maps

Speaking the “Language” of Spatial Analysis via Story Maps | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

"Spatial analysis has always been a hallmark of GIS, the 'numerical recipes' which set GIS apart from other forms of computerized visualization and information management. With GIS we pose questions and derive results using a wide array of analytical tools to help us understand and compare places, determine how places are related, find the best locations and paths, detect and quantify patterns, and even to make spatial predictions."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 21, 2014 7:50 PM

GIS is a key tool in spatial analysis, but it can also be a driving force in using math, science, technology and (yes) geography as interdisciplinary ways of teaching the curriculum.  StoryMaps can be rich with images and videos, but also filled with data at a variety of scales.  ESRI has share a "Maps we love" page with excellent examples of Story Maps and carefully explains WHY these maps work and HOW they were made.  Are you new to using the Analysis tool in ArcGIS Online?  Try this exercise on analyzing flood risk to guide you through some of the steps to learn what is possible for a project of your own.  What stories can you tell in this rich, visual format?  What visual template shown might lend itself best for that sort of project? 


Tagsmapping, GISESRIgeography education, geospatial, edtech.

Caterin Victor's curator insight, October 29, 2014 12:16 PM

 Not only Spatial, even plain geography is very interesting and important,  but.....not everybody understands, and want to...

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Thanksgiving Resources

Thanksgiving Resources | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

Thanksgiving has some fascinating spatial components to it.  My wife and I prepared an article for the Geography News Network on Maps101.com that shows the historical and geographic context of the first Thanksgiving and in the memorialization of Thanksgiving as a national holiday (if you don’t subscribe to Maps 101, it is also freely available as a podcast on Stitcher Radio or iTunes).


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 16, 2013 7:52 PM

One of my favorite combinations of maps for Thanksgiving involves the geography of food production and food consumption.  When we start looking at the regional dishes on Thanksgiving plates we can see some great patterns.  This ESRI storymap asks the simple question, where did your Thanksgiving Dinner come From?

 

This StoryMap is a great resource to combine with this New York Times article that shows the regional preferences for the most popular Thanksgiving recipes.  Where are sweet potatoes grown?  Where do people make sweet potato pie for Thanksgiving? 

Plymouth County, MA is heart of only 3 cranberry producing regions and is was also home to the first Thanksgiving.  How has this New England local ecology and traditional food patterns influenced national traditions? 

For these and more Thanksgiving resources on scoop.it, click here.

Tony Aguilar's curator insight, November 17, 2013 6:14 AM

This website is interesting because it gives us the geography of where specific foods in the country are manufactured such as cranberrie sauce, turkeys, sweet potatoes and helps us develop a rich cultural history and earn solidarity of where we come from and the traditions that make us who we are in terms of culinary choices. The original thanksgiving with the early puritan settlers in New England most likely reflected dishes that were synonomous with foods that natives grew and other local items that were family in this area. Now because of industry we to choose foods that have their origin from markets nationwide.

Al Picozzi's curator insight, November 17, 2013 12:35 PM

Love to see where the traditional American Thanksgiving food comes from.  We have that, but growing up in an all Italian household Thanksgivng was more then Turkey...it had an added Italian flavor.  Start with antipasto that had a prosciutto that would met in your mouth, plus cheeses, muhrooms, other meats, then would come the soup, then the pasta, could be any variety then the Turkey, but you would also have a ham because you never knew who was going to stop by, plus all the trimmings and then finally dessert with Italian cookies and pastires along with the Thanksgivng traditions of pumpkin and apple pies.  We took breaks inbetween courses to watch some football and make room for more food becasue it was all good.  We literally ate all day.  So for us out food came form all over the world.  In a nation of immigrants, we added our own flavor to an American Holiday..and to me whats more American than brining in some of your own hertitage into a holiday..we are after all a "melting pot"

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Remote Sensing and Land Cover Change

Remote Sensing and Land Cover Change | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

By moving the slider, the user can compare 1990 false-color Landsat views (left) with recent true-color imagery (right). Humans are increasingly transforming Earth’s surface—through direct activities such as farming, mining, and building, and indirectly by altering its climate.


This interactive feature includes 12 places that have experienced significant change since 1990.  This is an user-friendly way to compare remote sensing images over time.  Pictured above is the Aral Sea, which is and under-the-radar environmental catastrophe in Central Asia that has its roots in the Soviet era's (mis)management policies.  

 

Tags: remote sensing, land use, environment, geospatial, environment modify, esri, unit 1 Geoprinciples, zbestofzbest.


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Jake Red Dorman's curator insight, November 13, 2014 2:25 PM

Clearly the water level has decreased in Kazakhstan from 1990 until now. Farming, mining, and building are all indirectly changing the geography of some places. The use of rivers for cotton irrigation has shrunk by 3 quarters in the last 50 years and it is extremely affecting the Aral Sea. 

Edelin Espino's curator insight, December 13, 2014 3:10 PM

Is sad to see how humans are changing the environment forcing the wild creatures to abandon the places they've been living for hundred or years or die of starvation. I wonder what will happen in 300 years when there is no more big lakes and the oceans will be completed polluted .

Tanya Townsend's curator insight, November 20, 2015 2:57 PM

Great tool to show students how human use of natural resources can change landscapes and have permanent impacts on geographical landmarks such as the aerial sea. How do we stop it? Can we undo the damage done? How do we prevent these tragedies from happening in the future?