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The Strategic Importance of the Caspian Sea

"Stratfor Eurasia Analyst Eugene Chausovsky examines the Caspian Sea's large energy reserves and its conflicting maritime boundaries."


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Felix Ramos Jr.'s curator insight, April 15, 9:37 AM

Here is another example of a relatively small body of water that has multiple countries disputing over it.  Of course this is mainly due to the natural resources that lie under the Caspian Sea.  And again Russia is in the middle of another situation that has to deal with a small part of the world.  I find it fascinating what countries will do for otherwise meaningless areas of the world.

Kendra King's curator insight, April 28, 1:17 PM

This video does a great job depicting how neighbors complicate a situation anytime oil is involved.  As mentioned in class, these borders did not always exist. Prior to the collapse of the Soviet Union, it was just the SU and Iran who had to fight over the Caspian. Now there are 5 neighbors with conflicting ideas. Agreeing over oil would never be easy . However at least, Iran and Russia seem to be on the same page when it comes to keeping the project and the oil away from European benefit. With just those two as neighbor, a deal might have been possible due to there slightly common interests. Now though, I think there are too many competing ideas. So any headway on a deal will be next to impossible.  

 

I wouldn't be surprised if Russia took over Azerbaijan (or tries to take over the country) in the future. Since the lines were re-drawn, Azerbaijan has made out pretty well because they have all of the drilling tools and money that comes with it. When someone figures out how to move the oil of the Caspian, Russia is going to want the old equipment of theirs back. Furthermore, Azerbaijan was one of the countries who wanted to use the oil to benefit Europe according to this video. As mentioned in class,when the Ukraine thought about selling oil to Europe, Russia was none to pleased. In fact, oil was a major reason for why Russia invaded in the first place. Plus, with one less annoying neighbor, Russia would be closer to the oil in their hands. 

 

Given the complications of excess and unagreeable neighbors, Azerbaijan might want to invest a little more in its defense budget and a little less on the extravagant buildings they keep making. 

Rachel Phillips's curator insight, May 11, 5:39 PM

Having one body of water this size, with these resources, surrounded by five countries is a difficult situation, but also a very important one.  These natural resources could help the entire world, bringing down costs of oil and gas, and boosting the economies of not only thse five countries, but probably any countries who buy from them as well.  However, having the five countries, especially after the fall of the Soviet Union, surround a sea of this much importance can be concerning.  Despite the fact that this will make them all much wealthier than they already are, or maybe aren't, it will also mean that they can communicate and agree and make decisions as neighboring countries, not as opposing countries that were once part of the S.U.  To be able to come to an agreement on an issue this size could mean easier business later on in time.

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This Map Shows Why The Battle For 'Ukraine's Soul' Is So Pivotal

This Map Shows Why The Battle For 'Ukraine's Soul' Is So Pivotal | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
The tug-of-war for Ukraine.

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Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, February 18, 2014 3:04 PM

With gas being the key factor to the Russia-Eu tug of war over Ukraine, Russia fights hard to win this battle. Russia needs Ukraine as their own due to all the pipelines that transport the gas to Europe. Who will win this tug-of-war?

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, March 1, 2014 12:26 AM

This infographic gives an idea of why Russia is so invested in Ukraine. The energy infrastructure built during the Soviet era runs almost entirely through Ukraine. A significant amount of gasoline consumed in Europe comes from Russia via Ukraine, while over 2/3rds of all the gas Russia exports to the EU goes through Ukraine. This puts Ukraine in a position of power, but the country itself is divided between the East and West making siding with the EU or Russia difficult. These are lasting effects of the Soviet era.

Paige Therien's curator insight, May 4, 2014 11:28 AM

Besides the very intense cultural and political split that exists in Ukraine and the conflict as a whole, one of the key factors in this situation is gas.  This infographic shows that both Ukraine and the EU gets their gas from Russia, and Ukraine is the area which the gas lines flow through.  As soon as many people in Ukraine showed interest in joining the EU, Russia reminded Ukrainians and the world of this fact

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What Would Happen If The Entire World Lived Like Americans?

What Would Happen If The Entire World Lived Like Americans? | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

After making an infographic depicting how much space would be needed to house the entire world’s population based on the densities of various global cities, Tim De Chant of Per Square Mile got to thinking about the land resources it takes to support those same cities.


Tags: consumption, development, resources, energy, density, sustainability.


Via Seth Dixon
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Michelle Carvajal's comment, September 18, 2012 6:23 PM
Its very interesting that the United Arab Emirates would need more land mass than lets say China and the US. I guess what I'm trying to say is that the common misconception of people is that China has the greatest population. I definetely will rescoop this because people could actually see how hard it must be to house people who in essence would need all this land mass to live comfortably.
Thomas D's comment, April 22, 2013 4:13 PM
I thought that this was a very interesting graph and article to read. It shows that if the rest of the world lived like us Americans we would need four times the world’s surface, which is pretty substantial to think about. Although the United Arab Emirates is the leading this graph it’s hard to believe that America is in second. This goes to show that our way of living is out of hand, that the only reason we haven’t consumed everything is because the rest of the world is living of more reasonable amounts of resources or no resources at all. That we need to be as a country more conservative of our resources before we have to rely even more heavily than we already do on other countries. I was surprised to see that India has such a small percentage of resource consummation considering it is such a highly populated country.
Brianna Simao's comment, April 30, 2013 10:23 PM
Countries with a more advanced and urbanized way of life clearly would need more space to survive but if everyone lived like these more developed countries then natural selection dies and survival of the fittest takes over. Eventually all the natural resources would be used up. If they all continued to use the same amount and reproduce then the fertility rate would rapidly increase making the area overpopulated and the quality of life decreased. It is a good thing the entire world lives differently and has a diverse ecological footprint because it creates a balance in the world. As one country’s consumption is out of control another is holding down the fort because they lice more reasonably. It is interesting to see that even though China and India have the largest populations they don’t consume as many resources as the United States and the United Arab Emirates.
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Ethiopia's Dam Problems

Ethiopia's Dam Problems | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

"Ethiopia is three years from completing a dam to control its headwaters, and while Egypt points to colonial-era treaties to claim the water and to stop the project, the question remains as to who own the Blue Nile."


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Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, July 20, 2014 8:00 PM

Option: Inland water 

dilaycock's curator insight, July 21, 2014 9:09 PM

Useful example to illustrate the interactions and tensions between natural resources and political systems.

Kate Buckland's curator insight, July 26, 2014 10:38 PM

At least the Murray-Darling Basin is within one country - even if it covers 4 states!

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Mapping the Anthropocene

Mapping the Anthropocene | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

As follow-up to an earlier post about how we have enter the age of the Anthropocene, this stunning map is a fantastic visual representation of the forces that merit the dawning of a new geologic age.  This map depicts the lights at night, major roads, railways power lines, oversea cables, airline routes and shipping lanes.  It also expands the areas according to population size.  For more on the production of this map, see the Globaia website: http://globaia.org/en/anthropocene/

 


Via Seth Dixon, Dot MacKenzie, Geocrusader80
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Rescooped by FCHSAPGEO from Geography Education
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What Would Happen If The Entire World Lived Like Americans?

What Would Happen If The Entire World Lived Like Americans? | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

After making an infographic depicting how much space would be needed to house the entire world’s population based on the densities of various global cities, Tim De Chant of Per Square Mile got to thinking about the land resources it takes to support those same cities.


Tags: consumption, development, resources, energy, density, sustainability.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Michelle Carvajal's comment, September 18, 2012 6:23 PM
Its very interesting that the United Arab Emirates would need more land mass than lets say China and the US. I guess what I'm trying to say is that the common misconception of people is that China has the greatest population. I definetely will rescoop this because people could actually see how hard it must be to house people who in essence would need all this land mass to live comfortably.
Thomas D's comment, April 22, 2013 4:13 PM
I thought that this was a very interesting graph and article to read. It shows that if the rest of the world lived like us Americans we would need four times the world’s surface, which is pretty substantial to think about. Although the United Arab Emirates is the leading this graph it’s hard to believe that America is in second. This goes to show that our way of living is out of hand, that the only reason we haven’t consumed everything is because the rest of the world is living of more reasonable amounts of resources or no resources at all. That we need to be as a country more conservative of our resources before we have to rely even more heavily than we already do on other countries. I was surprised to see that India has such a small percentage of resource consummation considering it is such a highly populated country.
Brianna Simao's comment, April 30, 2013 10:23 PM
Countries with a more advanced and urbanized way of life clearly would need more space to survive but if everyone lived like these more developed countries then natural selection dies and survival of the fittest takes over. Eventually all the natural resources would be used up. If they all continued to use the same amount and reproduce then the fertility rate would rapidly increase making the area overpopulated and the quality of life decreased. It is a good thing the entire world lives differently and has a diverse ecological footprint because it creates a balance in the world. As one country’s consumption is out of control another is holding down the fort because they lice more reasonably. It is interesting to see that even though China and India have the largest populations they don’t consume as many resources as the United States and the United Arab Emirates.