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Why everyone should be able to read a map

Why everyone should be able to read a map | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
New research suggests that map reading is a dying skill in the age of the smartphone. Perish the thought, says Rob Cowen

Via Seth Dixon
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CT Blake's curator insight, September 2, 4:21 PM

Especially Connor McCloud.

Lindley Amarantos's curator insight, September 5, 9:17 AM

this can explain why it is important to NOT always rely on technology. It is good to keep your brain active and the spatial awareness that comes with reading a map is invaluable

Dolors Cantacorps's curator insight, September 5, 3:13 PM

Practiquem-ho a classe doncs!

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Making room for girls

Making room for girls | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
IN THIS week's print edition we look at an important issue in development economics: how to reduce the gap between the number of girls and boys being educated...

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dilaycock's curator insight, November 5, 2013 8:51 PM

Whilst overall statistics highlight a narrowing of the gap regarding gendered access to education, the UN statistics also indicate the uneven nature of the improvement in terms of geographical location and age. For older girls in sub-Saharan Africa, the enrolment gap between girls and boys is widening. 

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100 People: A World Portrait

100 People: A World Portrait | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

This is the truly global project that asks the children of the world to introduce us to the people of the world.  We've seen videos and resources that ask the question, "if there were only 100 people in the world, what would it look like?"  This takes that idea of making demographic statistics more meaningful one step further by asking student in schools for around the world to nominate some "representative people" and share their stories.  The site houses videos, galleries from each continent and analyze themes that all societies must deal with.  This site that looks at the people and places on out planet to promote greater appreciation of cultural diversity and understanding is a great find. 

 

Tags: Worldwide, statistics, K12, education, comparison.


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ana boa-ventura's curator insight, June 28, 2013 2:31 AM

If you're looking at social media and diversity don't miss this site...In the last couple of years we've seen several sites / videos/ blogs rotating around the question 'if there were only 100 people in the world... ' In this case, children were asked to identify 'representative people' of that group of 100 and use visuals... many visuals.  And visuals of course bring up skin color, living conditions and much more. I don't want to be a spoiler though...Viist the site!

Canberra Girls Grammar GSSF's curator insight, September 1, 2013 10:43 PM

Year 7 Liveability Unit 2

savvy's curator insight, September 3, 12:57 PM

This just makes me realize how the world would be if we only had 100 people rather than the billions we have now.

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High-School Dropouts and College Grads Are Moving to Very Different Places

High-School Dropouts and College Grads Are Moving to Very Different Places | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
Cities like Washington and San Francisco are gaining the highly skilled but losing their less-educated workforce.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 16, 2:56 PM

This article, with its charts and interactive maps, is worth exploring to show some of the important spatial patterns of internal migration.  It's not hard to realize that larger, cosmopolitan metro areas will have an advantage in attracting and keeping prospective college graduates; the question that we should be asking our students is how will this impact neighborhoods, cities and regions?    


Tags: migration, USA, mappingcensus, education.

Kaylin Burleson's curator insight, June 19, 8:47 AM

Good charts/grafts - worth looking at and using with the concept of migration.   

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The No Good, Very Bad Outlook for the Working-Class American Man

The No Good, Very Bad Outlook for the Working-Class American Man | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

The U.S. economy once worked like a finely meshed machine. That is not true anymore. The U.S. economy is still a powerful engine, but workers aren’t seeing the benefits, less-educated men are struggling, and the rich have disconnected from everyone else.


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, December 16, 2012 3:39 PM

The problems with the economy are not universally spread throughout society.  Certain segments are impacted more than others by the current struggles, especially when with look at axes of identity, such as class, gender and ethnicity.  While planning on a blue-collar job in the 1950s could have been a solid career plan for a young man in the United States, not so in the 21st century.     


Tags: labor, gender, class, industry, education.