FCHS AP HUMAN GEO...
Follow
Find tag "density"
5.9K views | +5 today
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by FCHSAPGEO from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Developing World Cities and Population Density

Developing World Cities and Population Density | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
Without a question, we are living in an urban era. More people now live in cities than anywhere else on the planet and I’ve repeatedly argued that cities are our most important economic engine. As a result of these shifts, we’re seeing megacities at a scale the world has never seen before.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Mr Steven Newman's curator insight, June 26, 5:25 PM

Just a few years ago there were only  20 cities with a pop over 10 million.  I'll use this with my  10 geography class to compare Australia's population and size with these cities and  look at debates around policies.  I,ll try and get the students to debate around ecological sustainability.

Fathie Kundie's curator insight, June 27, 12:05 PM
المدن الأعلى كثافة بالسكان على مستوى العالم
Sally Egan's curator insight, June 29, 9:31 PM

Mega cities and the challenges they face for the future is focus in this article. Great statistics on populations and urban densities are also included.

Rescooped by FCHSAPGEO from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Megacities Reflect Growing Urbanization Trend

Read the Transcript: http://to.pbs.org/b6sR86 The capital of the South Asian country Bangladesh, Dhaka, has a population that is booming. However, it stands ...

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Peter Steffan's curator insight, October 9, 2013 4:51 PM

See attached video clips!

Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 1, 2:44 PM

It is very sad that people have to move to a polluted, crowded mess of a place in order to get a better life. The man says at the end that if they can make it work in Dhaka, they could make it work in any city but the beginning is too monumental to get over. I think that maybe some government control over the outer limits of the city and offering a place nearby with some resources may allow more control over the growth of the city at least temporarily.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 8:50 PM

To be a megacity like this, you have to conform to urbanization. There is no possible way to have such a populated and crowed city with farmlands around. This is a place of business yet residential areas, it also is where the marketplaces are and where kids go to school. Megacities need to be a part of an urban society in order for them to stay afloat.

Rescooped by FCHSAPGEO from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

What Would Happen If The Entire World Lived Like Americans?

What Would Happen If The Entire World Lived Like Americans? | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

After making an infographic depicting how much space would be needed to house the entire world’s population based on the densities of various global cities, Tim De Chant of Per Square Mile got to thinking about the land resources it takes to support those same cities.


Tags: consumption, development, resources, energy, density, sustainability.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Michelle Carvajal's comment, September 18, 2012 6:23 PM
Its very interesting that the United Arab Emirates would need more land mass than lets say China and the US. I guess what I'm trying to say is that the common misconception of people is that China has the greatest population. I definetely will rescoop this because people could actually see how hard it must be to house people who in essence would need all this land mass to live comfortably.
Thomas D's comment, April 22, 2013 4:13 PM
I thought that this was a very interesting graph and article to read. It shows that if the rest of the world lived like us Americans we would need four times the world’s surface, which is pretty substantial to think about. Although the United Arab Emirates is the leading this graph it’s hard to believe that America is in second. This goes to show that our way of living is out of hand, that the only reason we haven’t consumed everything is because the rest of the world is living of more reasonable amounts of resources or no resources at all. That we need to be as a country more conservative of our resources before we have to rely even more heavily than we already do on other countries. I was surprised to see that India has such a small percentage of resource consummation considering it is such a highly populated country.
Brianna Simao's comment, April 30, 2013 10:23 PM
Countries with a more advanced and urbanized way of life clearly would need more space to survive but if everyone lived like these more developed countries then natural selection dies and survival of the fittest takes over. Eventually all the natural resources would be used up. If they all continued to use the same amount and reproduce then the fertility rate would rapidly increase making the area overpopulated and the quality of life decreased. It is a good thing the entire world lives differently and has a diverse ecological footprint because it creates a balance in the world. As one country’s consumption is out of control another is holding down the fort because they lice more reasonably. It is interesting to see that even though China and India have the largest populations they don’t consume as many resources as the United States and the United Arab Emirates.
Rescooped by FCHSAPGEO from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

If the world’s population lived in one city…

If the world’s population lived in one city… | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

This is an very intriguing map that shows different urban layouts and applies the concept of population density at the city scale and compares it to the global population.  What is everyone lived in the city of New York (at New York's population density)?  How big would that city be? 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by FCHSAPGEO from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

London Urban Form 3D Map

Visualisation of the density and function of the built-environment in Greater London 2010. Shows the dominance of the intensifying city-centre, corridors of commercial development and the smaller scale centres in Outer London.

 

This is a fantastic way to visually comprehend the spatial urban patterns and densities of a world city like London.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by FCHSAPGEO from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

What Would Happen If The Entire World Lived Like Americans?

What Would Happen If The Entire World Lived Like Americans? | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

After making an infographic depicting how much space would be needed to house the entire world’s population based on the densities of various global cities, Tim De Chant of Per Square Mile got to thinking about the land resources it takes to support those same cities.


Tags: consumption, development, resources, energy, density, sustainability.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Michelle Carvajal's comment, September 18, 2012 6:23 PM
Its very interesting that the United Arab Emirates would need more land mass than lets say China and the US. I guess what I'm trying to say is that the common misconception of people is that China has the greatest population. I definetely will rescoop this because people could actually see how hard it must be to house people who in essence would need all this land mass to live comfortably.
Thomas D's comment, April 22, 2013 4:13 PM
I thought that this was a very interesting graph and article to read. It shows that if the rest of the world lived like us Americans we would need four times the world’s surface, which is pretty substantial to think about. Although the United Arab Emirates is the leading this graph it’s hard to believe that America is in second. This goes to show that our way of living is out of hand, that the only reason we haven’t consumed everything is because the rest of the world is living of more reasonable amounts of resources or no resources at all. That we need to be as a country more conservative of our resources before we have to rely even more heavily than we already do on other countries. I was surprised to see that India has such a small percentage of resource consummation considering it is such a highly populated country.
Brianna Simao's comment, April 30, 2013 10:23 PM
Countries with a more advanced and urbanized way of life clearly would need more space to survive but if everyone lived like these more developed countries then natural selection dies and survival of the fittest takes over. Eventually all the natural resources would be used up. If they all continued to use the same amount and reproduce then the fertility rate would rapidly increase making the area overpopulated and the quality of life decreased. It is a good thing the entire world lives differently and has a diverse ecological footprint because it creates a balance in the world. As one country’s consumption is out of control another is holding down the fort because they lice more reasonably. It is interesting to see that even though China and India have the largest populations they don’t consume as many resources as the United States and the United Arab Emirates.
Rescooped by FCHSAPGEO from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Population Density

Population Density | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

"[This map's] an unabashedly generalized interactive population density map inspired/stolen from a map by William Bunge entitled Islands of Mankind that I came across on John Krygier‘s blog. I thought Bunge’s map was a novel way to look at population density, and I’ve tried to stay close to the spirit of the original."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Kamaryn Hunt's comment, October 7, 2013 6:22 PM
I really liked this map, because it showed me how spread out we are. I actually didnt realize the world was THIS populated!
Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, October 12, 2013 5:23 PM

This interactive map shows the varying intensities of population density, and the first thing that I thought of was how low the population density is in my hometown, compared to some of the bigger cities or areas around the world.  I am from a rural area of Rhode Island, and there are plenty of farms near my home, as well as woods and ponds.  It really is a beautiful area, which made me think that if population densities were so high- the maximum density on the interactive map was over 500 people per square kilometer- that there would  be less room for the beauty of the natural world in those densely populated areas.  I grew up playing in my woods, and I am always shocked by city-dwellers that live in places where their yards have one or two trees (and are considered to live in 'woodsy' areas of their towns), or have no yards at all.  My town has a low population density, and much of the land is occupied by the reservoir, farms, and woodland areas that are not permissible for development.  Although my hometown is not a city, it serves the more populated areas- such as Providence- by providing water to their city.  It seems the more populated areas drain the surrounding areas of their natural beauty and resources.

Steven Flis's curator insight, December 17, 2013 12:31 PM

Mindblowing interractive map dealing with the population desinty of the world.  From tinkering around with this ive seen some scary things. As we all know the North East metropolis area is compact with people from rhode island to delaware and everything in between. but when you take the map to 100 people per square to kilomete it almost disapears. This in itself wouldnt be that bad but when you move the image to 500 per kilometer almost the entireity of India is still there. This is a perfect compaitive example of how jam packed south eastern asia is and its actually pretty scary.

Rescooped by FCHSAPGEO from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Megacities Reflect Growing Urbanization Trend

Read the Transcript: http://to.pbs.org/b6sR86 The capital of the South Asian country Bangladesh, Dhaka, has a population that is booming. However, it stands ...

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Peter Steffan's curator insight, October 9, 2013 4:51 PM

See attached video clips!

Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 1, 2:44 PM

It is very sad that people have to move to a polluted, crowded mess of a place in order to get a better life. The man says at the end that if they can make it work in Dhaka, they could make it work in any city but the beginning is too monumental to get over. I think that maybe some government control over the outer limits of the city and offering a place nearby with some resources may allow more control over the growth of the city at least temporarily.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 8:50 PM

To be a megacity like this, you have to conform to urbanization. There is no possible way to have such a populated and crowed city with farmlands around. This is a place of business yet residential areas, it also is where the marketplaces are and where kids go to school. Megacities need to be a part of an urban society in order for them to stay afloat.

Rescooped by FCHSAPGEO from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

80% of Americans Live Within 20 Miles of a Starbucks

80% of Americans Live Within 20 Miles of a Starbucks | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

The green dots on this map representing Starbucks locations which are obviously clustered in major metropolitan centers.  Cross-referencing this Starbucks address location with population data, Davenport explains his mapping technique: "By counting the number of people who live within a given distance to each Starbucks, we can measure how well centered Frappuccinos are to the US citizenry. In other words: draw a 1-mile circle around every store, then add up the % of the population living within the circles. Repeat for 2, 3, 4....100 miles."   The result of this data is a fabulous logrithmic S-curve which explains much about the American population distribution.   

 

Tags: statistics, density, consumption, mapping, visualization, urban.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Rich's comment, October 10, 2012 1:26 PM
That is insane how large that corperation is.
Rescooped by FCHSAPGEO from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Day vs. Night population maps

Day vs. Night population maps | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

A great image for showing the pulsating rythmns of a dynamic urban system.  We treat population density as a static metric, but how many people are in a given place would truly be difficult to fully quantify.  What logisitic difficulties would this shift present for cities?  


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Wildcardspades58's comment, December 16, 2011 11:44 AM
I would be interested to find out how these were created and how the data was recorded.
Darius Kidd's comment, August 27, 2013 10:44 AM
There is not much Definiton on this map......
Rescooped by FCHSAPGEO from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Distance To McDonald’s

Distance To McDonald’s | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

This map answers a few simple questions:  How far away is the nearest McDonald's?  Where is the concentration of McDonald's highest or lowest?  While population density is the immediate pattern that we identify, what else can this map show us?   


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Kalin B.'s comment, November 5, 2012 11:27 AM
Diffusion and globalization are truly forces to be reckoned with.