FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY
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Countries in multiple hemispheres

Countries in multiple hemispheres | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon
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Louis Mazza's curator insight, May 6, 2015 10:12 AM

This articles starts off describing the two meridians that divide the eastern and western hemispheres, the prime meridian and the 180th meridian. The prime meridian is the line of longitude where longitude is equal to zero. Countries east of the prime meridian are considered in the eastern hemisphere, while all countries west are located in the western hemisphere.

                Eight countries intersect in-between both of these hemispheres, there are the United Kingdom, in Europe France, Spain, Algeria, Mali, Burkina Faso, Ghana, and Togo.

                The 180th meridian is opposite the prime, and countries to the west of the 180th are in the eastern hemisphere.

                This is an interesting thing to examine because these locations are not set in stone. The tectonic plates that hold these countries will always be shifting in different directions. So in 20 years from now I wonder is the number 8 will increase or decrease?

Felix Ramos Jr.'s curator insight, May 7, 2015 9:21 PM

Pretty neat information contained on this page.  Kiribati is the only country in the world located in all four hemispheres.  That is a place that I would love to visit.  There are not many countries that can say they are even a part of two hemispheres, let alone four.  

Mark Hathaway's curator insight, December 4, 2015 9:27 AM

Being in multiple hemispheres at the same time is fascinating. The UK is mostly in the western hemisphere. Except, a little sliver is actually located in the eastern hemisphere. France is the opposite. The majority of the country is located in the eastern hemisphere, but a small minority is actually in the western hemisphere. This division is possible, do to the advent of the Prime Meridian. It seems to me, that the equator gets all the publicity in Geography. The Prime Meridian is the distain step cousin that everyone avoids. Looking at the world through the lens of the prime meridian is actually much more interesting. These more scientific distinctions of East and West, hardly jive with the more accepted cultural distinctions. France is a western nation, yet it is mostly in the Eastern section of the globe. The gap between science and culture, is often drastic.

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Island shown in Google Maps doesn’t actually exist

Island shown in Google Maps doesn’t actually exist | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

There’s a South Pacific island positioned midway between Australia and New Caledonia featured on various marine charts, world maps, and has appeared in publications since at least the year 2000. It’s listed as Sandy Island on Google Maps and Google Earth, and yet Australian scientists have just discovered it doesn’t exist.

 

As part of a 25-day voyage, the group went to the area, only to find  a 1,400m (4,620ft) deep section of the Coral Sea. The team collected 197 different rock samples, more than 6800km of marine geophysical data, and mapped over 14,000 square kilometers of the ocean floor.  This is just a reminder that a map is only as reliable as the information used to compile that map.   For another reminder of this same idea see "The Republic of Null Island." 


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Jess Deady's curator insight, May 1, 2014 10:36 AM

Typical. How many times do we see information on the internet thats not totally accurate? Although maps such as Google Maps should be accurate enough for people to trust them this wasn't the case. Who knows why there is this random island that doesn't actually exist on the map?

Jason Schneider's curator insight, April 9, 2015 11:15 PM

I'm attempting to look up this island on google maps and I can't seem to find it. This island is known as "Sandy Island" and I even typed that up. Apparently, when they sailed to this "island", they pretty much sailed through it without noticing. Based on the fact that geographers had to map the ocean floor, my guess has something to do with the fact that the tides rise up at night to the point where it covers the whole island at some points.

 
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First photographs emerge of new Pacific island off Tonga

First photographs emerge of new Pacific island off Tonga | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

The first photographs have emerged of a newly formed volcanic island in the Pacific Ocean after three men climbed to the peak of the land mass off the coast of Tonga. Experts believe a volcano exploded underwater and then expanded until an island formed. The island is expected to erode back into the ocean in a matter of months.


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Louis Mazza's curator insight, May 6, 2015 10:17 AM

A new one mile island of the coast of Tonga in Oceania west coast of Australia. A volcano exploded underwater, turning lava in rock and pushing through the surface of the ocean to expose a new island. Three men have scaled the peak of the mountain to date. The men say the surface was still hot and the green lake in the crater smelt strongly of sulfur.

                This is great example of geography constantly undergoing changes and new looks and features. Officials say that this island will be eroded away within the next month so they will not even name it I wonder how many islands like this has happened to, or if inhabitants went to live there then the next day there home is underwater. This is another great example of plate tectonic and active under sea forces that we do not see with our eyes, and what most people do not think of on a daily basis, but is working on a daily basis, constantly changing geography and our world. 

Felix Ramos Jr.'s curator insight, May 7, 2015 9:34 PM

I just find this fascinating.  History is excellent to study but so is the watching history in the making.  This volcanic island formation off the coast of Tonga is a modern day phenomenon which will one day be history.  Some people predict it will erode back into the water but some others think it will be able to last longer.  Either way stuff like this is pretty cool to watch and study while it is happening before your very own eyes.

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 14, 2015 11:20 PM

This is pretty cool that a new island is being formed, due to a volcano that erupted under water. I am sure there are many more in other places, but it is a new opportunity for life, development and travel. Although since it is new, obviously now would not be a good time because you do not want a volcano erupting on people, that would not be an ideal situation. Although, I hope to one day be able to travel to this new island to check it out.