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40 Percent Of The World's Cropland Is In Or Near Cities

40 Percent Of The World's Cropland Is In Or Near Cities | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
Just how much of the world's cropland can we really call urban? That's been a big mystery until now.


Now, a study published in the journal Environmental Research Letters has an answer: Somewhere around 1.1 billion acres is being cultivated for food in or within about 12 miles (20 kilometers) of cities. Most of that land is on the periphery of cities, but 16.6 percent of these urban farms are in open spaces within the municipal core.


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Evan Margiotta's curator insight, March 20, 2015 2:42 PM

This is a perfect application of how Von Thunen model still applies today. Von Thunen mapped how crops were distributed around cites. The crops near the city were labor intensive while the crops farther away from the city were labor extensive. Von Thunen's model is often disputed today in a world with such fast transportation, but this study shows that it still applies today. Unit 5 Agriculture

Ellen Van Daele's curator insight, March 22, 2015 3:34 PM

This research explores the concept of urban agriculture and the water supply needed and used. It came up with surprising results that state that 80% of urban agriculture is in the developing world and 40% of urban agriculture is in or near cities.  

 

The research also covered water supply, stating that most of urban agriculture relies on irrigation. This is especially true in South Asia, and since the water resources are already scarce, the farmers have to compete for water with the government.

Raychel Johnson's curator insight, March 22, 2015 7:55 PM

Summary: This article is mostly about how much of our agriculture is grown within 20 miles of a city. It turns out 40% of agriculture is grown in this proximity of a city, and this mostly occurs with irrigated agriculture in South Asia. Most of these urban farms are in the developing world as well. 

 

Insight: This article relates to the von Thunen model because it directly talks about the rings that occur around a city, although it is a skewed version of it. I think this is also a good example of how cities have changed since the developing of the von Thunen model, showing that developed countries are supporting the idea of urban agriculture. 

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Polder and wiser

Polder and wiser | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
How long until the robots arrive? AT THE entrance to Hoeve Rosa farm, in the southern Dutch province of Limburg, a sign gives a warning that unmanned machines might...
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Urbanisation Up Close - Speaking of Medicine

Urbanisation Up Close - Speaking of Medicine | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
Jocalyn Clark @jocalynclark discusses the urbanisation of the world’s population and its impact on global health. Image credit: joiseyshowaa, Flickr Undeni

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City of Endangered Languages

"New York has long been a city of immigrants, but linguists now consider it a laboratory for studying and preserving languages in rapid decline elsewhere in the world."


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Alexandra Piggott's curator insight, November 4, 2014 4:30 PM

Is globalisation enabling the preservation and study of declining languages?

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, November 5, 2014 7:59 PM

I will be showing this in class DO NOT use it for your scoop it review--

 

unit 3

SRA's curator insight, April 19, 2015 10:30 PM

Victoria Margo



This article really caught my eye because at a young age I was taught to speak spanish and english at the same time, and now that I am older I realize how important it is to know two languages. I will forever be grateful that my parents took the time and made my sisters and I learn something different while growing up.

Languages change over a long period of time and many times languages grow or die within time. Two main vocabulary words that I have not forgotten are Language divergence and Language convergence. Language divergence is the dividing of a language into many new languages. Language convergence is when two languages merge to become one. Both these definitions are extremely important when talking about how some languages will soon be extinct. I believe many languages have been endangered due to families and parents who do not continue speaking their language when they leave their original country/state. Language is very important to our world and society today. As stated from the short video clip, if you do not continue speaking your language then who will? I agree with that completely if you don't practice something over and over again how do you expect to get any better at it? This video was a great way to express the diffusion of languages and how families today still practice their language. This video made me think about and reflect on the video we watched in Geography class a couple weeks back because of the decline of all languages that we may not even be aware of. Many times it is hard to find older people who speak your native language but I also learned from the video we watched in class that it is possible if you are willing to try and continue something that is important to you. There are many different languages that connect to our world. 

I also liked how this article mentioned that New York is the city of immigrants, meaning New York is full of different cultures and unique language. Although this article/video does say that language has been endangered it can definitely be changed with a little knowledge of why this is happening. Geography and language tie in together quite well. I am hoping many languages can be saved for the future. 

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The stark difference between what poor babies and rich babies eat

The stark difference between what poor babies and rich babies eat | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
A team of researchers analyzed more than 1,500 infant diets. It was clear which babies tended to be fed appropriately, and which did not.
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Linguistic Family Tree

Linguistic Family Tree | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

"When linguists talk about the historical relationship between languages, they use a tree metaphor. An ancient source (say, Indo-European) has various branches (e.g., Romance, Germanic), which themselves have branches (West Germanic, North Germanic), which feed into specific languages (Swedish, Danish, Norwegian).  Minna Sundberg, creator of the webcomic Stand Still. Stay Silent, a story set in a lushly imagined post-apocalyptic Nordic world, has drawn the antidote to the boring linguistic tree diagram."


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Linda Denty's curator insight, November 9, 2014 7:31 PM

A really wonderful graphic.

Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, November 11, 2014 3:21 AM

Linguistic Family Tree

Sreya Ayinala's curator insight, December 2, 2014 9:50 PM

Unit 3 Cultural Patterns and Processes (Language)

      The image shows how many languages are related and have many common ancestors. Languages are grouped into language families and are even more broadly categorized.

      Language is a huge part of culture and it is the way that people communicate amongst each other. There are hundreds of languages in our world, but as globalization and pop culture diffuse many languages are being lost and no longer spoken. A good example of a dead language would be Latin. Many of our common day languages trace their roots back to Latin, but no one speaks Latin anymore.

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Speaking the “Language” of Spatial Analysis via Story Maps

Speaking the “Language” of Spatial Analysis via Story Maps | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

"Spatial analysis has always been a hallmark of GIS, the 'numerical recipes' which set GIS apart from other forms of computerized visualization and information management. With GIS we pose questions and derive results using a wide array of analytical tools to help us understand and compare places, determine how places are related, find the best locations and paths, detect and quantify patterns, and even to make spatial predictions."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 21, 2014 7:50 PM

GIS is a key tool in spatial analysis, but it can also be a driving force in using math, science, technology and (yes) geography as interdisciplinary ways of teaching the curriculum.  StoryMaps can be rich with images and videos, but also filled with data at a variety of scales.  ESRI has share a "Maps we love" page with excellent examples of Story Maps and carefully explains WHY these maps work and HOW they were made.  Are you new to using the Analysis tool in ArcGIS Online?  Try this exercise on analyzing flood risk to guide you through some of the steps to learn what is possible for a project of your own.  What stories can you tell in this rich, visual format?  What visual template shown might lend itself best for that sort of project? 


Tagsmapping, GISESRIgeography education, geospatial, edtech.

Caterin Victor's curator insight, October 29, 2014 12:16 PM

 Not only Spatial, even plain geography is very interesting and important,  but.....not everybody understands, and want to...

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Second immigration wave lifts diversity to record high

Second immigration wave lifts diversity to record high | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
Immigration and other changes mean America looks very different than it did 50 years ago. What will the next 50 look like?
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Obama admin. to allow thousands of Haitians into U.S. without visas: ‘Which countries are next?’

Obama admin. to allow thousands of Haitians into U.S. without visas: ‘Which countries are next?’ | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
The ranking Republican on the Senate Judiciary Committee took the Obama administration to task Friday for its “irresponsible” plan to allow as many as 100,000 Haitians to immigrate to the U.S. without a visa.
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Population Density

This talks about what population density is and why people live where they do.-- Created using PowToon -- Free sign up at http://www.powtoon.com/ . Make your...

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Jeremy Hansen's curator insight, October 21, 2014 10:46 AM

Excellent short video defining and explaining population density. 

Catherine Pearce's curator insight, October 23, 2014 6:35 PM

A nice straight forward presentation

Bradley Hunkins's curator insight, October 28, 2014 2:55 PM

Why do people live in the locations they do and how can we impact our enviroment

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Feeding the Whole World

"Louise Fresco argues that a smart approach to large-scale, industrial farming and food production will feed our planet's incoming population of nine billion. Only foods like (the scorned) supermarket white bread, she says, will nourish on a global scale."


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dilaycock's curator insight, October 19, 2014 6:45 PM

Fresco argues that we tend to see "home-made" agriculture as a thing of beauty, whereas the reality is that many small scale farmers struggle and live a subsistence lifestyle. The adoration of small-scale farming, notes Fresco, is a luxury to those who can afford it. Large-scale production has increased the availability and affordability of food. Food production should be given as high a priority as climate change and sustainability, and we should seriously consider ways in which land can be used as a multi-purpose space that includes agriculture.

Stephen Zimmett's curator insight, October 24, 2014 10:55 AM

Louise Fresco speaks of local food production and small scale control

and the entire food nework

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, March 16, 3:43 PM

Many advocates of local foods favor a small-scale approach to farming and are opposed to large-scale agribusiness. It might be easy for those disconnected from the food production system (like me) to romanticize and mythologize the farmers of yesteryear and yearn to return to this past.  This talk highlights how essential large-scale farming is absolutely critical to feeding the global population; this other TED talk discusses many of the hunger problems especially the uneven access to food.  Here are some other pro-agribusiness resources.   

 

Tags: agriculture, food production, food distribution, agribusiness, TED

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Let’s Talk About Geography and Ebola

Let’s Talk About Geography and Ebola | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
Why knowing where countries are in Africa matters for how the rest of the world thinks about Ebola.

 

Cultural and media norms that often refer to Africa as one entity rather than an 11.7 million-square-mile land mass comprised of 54 countries and over 1.1 billion people who speak over 2,000 different languages.  This cultural confusion means that, when a dangerous virus like Ebola breaks out, Americans who are used to referring to “Africa” as one entity may make mistakes in understanding just how big of a threat Ebola actually is, who might have been exposed to it, and what the likelihood of an individual contracting it might be.  This Ebola outbreak is wreaking havoc on African economies beyond the three most heavily affected by Ebola, and that damage is completely avoidable. The East and Southern African safari industry provides a good example. Bookings for safaris there — including for the famed Great Migration in Kenya and Tanzania — have plummeted due to the Ebola outbreak. These actions are based in fear, not reality.

 

Tags: Ebola, medical, diffusion, Africa, regions, perspective.


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Lora Tortolani's curator insight, March 18, 2015 9:36 PM

It doesn't surprise me that the average person doesn't know his geography.  It shocks the hell out of me that a college would put themselves in a situation to look that stupid!  Do your research people.

Jared Medeiros's curator insight, March 29, 2015 5:08 PM

This is another example of stereotyping taking its course through Africa.  Even though I am aware of the size and diversity of Africa, I was guilty of associating Ebola with the whole continent and not just the affected areas.  Same thing goes with the AIDS virus and other things, such as poverty.  Articles are great for people in other parts of the world to read to better educate them on the size and diversity of Africa and that there are many different ways of life in its 54 countries.

Raymond Dolloff's curator insight, December 15, 2015 12:44 AM

The Ebola epidemic over the last year put everyone in the world on high alert, not just those who lived in Sierra Leone and many countries in West Africa. It is important to understand how the virus spread so quickly and the advancements made to treat the virus. Geography played a big part of the spread of the virus. Because Africa, and the countries are far from modern medical technology, many non-profit organizations like Doctors without Borders were dispatched to those affected areas to help show and train physicians there the proper techniques on how to treat infected people with Ebola. That's why on the map one can see a far range of countries who treated infected people in facilities that were built to handle cases of Ebola.

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America is rapidly aging in a country built for the young

America is rapidly aging in a country built for the young | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

"Although we seldom think about them this way, most American communities as they exist today were built for the spry and mobile. We've constructed millions of multi-story, single-family homes where the master bedroom is on the second floor, where the lawn outside requires weekly upkeep, where the mailbox is a stroll away. We've designed neighborhoods where everyday errands require a driver's license. We've planned whole cities where, if you don't have a car, it's not particularly easy to walk anywhere — especially not if you move gingerly.

This reality has been a fine one for a younger country. Those multi-story, single-family homes with broad lawns were great for Baby Boomers when they had young families. And car-dependent suburbs have been fine for residents with the means and mobility to drive everywhere. But as the Baby Boomers whose preferences drove a lot of these trends continue to age, it's becoming increasingly clear that the housing and communities we've built won't work very well for the old."


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Alexandra Piggott's curator insight, October 18, 2014 6:48 PM

This is also an issue in Australia where the overwhelming majority of people live in single story dwellings and are very car reliant.

Joshua Mason's curator insight, January 28, 2015 8:59 PM

I can definitely see this as a real problem. Both my Uncle and my Great Uncle moved their condos from ones that had numerous steps to climb to the second floor to more elder-friendly options. My Great Uncle even went a step further to move him and his wife to a senior living community, where there food, entertainment, etc. is all provided within an enclosed neighbourhood with other people of their age group. More of these communities that act like oversized retirement homes could be the answer. They give the illusion of suburban living, something the baby boomers liked, while providing the accessibility they need.

Dawn Haas Tache's curator insight, April 8, 2015 12:27 PM

APHG- HW Option 1

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Earth’s Soil Is Getting Too Salty for Crops to Grow

Earth’s Soil Is Getting Too Salty for Crops to Grow | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
Buildup of salts on irrigated land has already degraded an area the size of France and is causing $27.3 billion annually in lost crops
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Bella Reagan's curator insight, November 28, 2014 5:35 PM

Unit 1-Nature and perspectives on geography

 

This article is about the growing problem of salinization in soil, causing soil that is unable to grow or is toxic to most crops. Corn is one of the few crops that can grow. Irrigation leads to the higher concentrations of salt because of salts in the water left behind after it evaporates. The Indus VAlley of pakistan is suffering from this problem with almost a 50 percent decline in rice production. The Colorado river Basin is also being affected. 

 

This article ties to this unit in connecting the land and soils incapability to grow plants affecting humans. Humans are guilty of the high salt in the soil from use of irrigation to water plants not near water sources. Irrigation helps the plants but the long term affect is decreasing production. The salt concentration is declining food production resulting in millions of dollars lost in affected areas. This proves nature and human productivity are tied closely together, with humans changing and trying to help nature through irrigation, but ultimately hurting the land overtime. 

Lydia Tsao's curator insight, March 24, 2015 12:49 AM

The reason why salinization of soils is becoming a bigger and bigger issue is because of widespread commercial agriculture. Large companies that control commercial farms could not care less about the environment; they only care about making the most profit in the shortest amount of time. With large companies being dangerously vulnerable to sudden changes in the economy toward collapse, these large companies want to make a lot of profit without considering the environment. Because these companies want to make a lot of money, they are forcing farms to constantly replant and grow monocultures to satisfy the growing demand for food. This constant replanting does not allow for the soil to replenish its nutrients and go about its natural nitrogenous cycle, causing the over-salinization of soil as the soil cannot handle that much salt at one time. When these large companies are done squeezing the life juices of these farmers, they simply drop the farmer, leave the farmer all the problems, and move on the suck the blood of suffering farmers who need the support from large companies to survive.

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Where's that bean been? Coffee's journey from crop to cafe

Where's that bean been? Coffee's journey from crop to cafe | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
Welcome to the third instalment in our series Chemistry of Coffee, where we unravel the delicious secrets of one of the most widely consumed drinks in the world. As you listen to the whirring grinders…

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Too rich for its own good

Too rich for its own good | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
The Democratic Republic of Congo is potentially one of the richest countries on earth, but colonialism, slavery and corruption have turned it into one of the poorest

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Jacob Conklin's curator insight, May 6, 2015 1:04 PM

Geography talks a lot about the impact of globalization and imperialism. One of the best examples of this is found in The Democratic Republic of Congo. For its entire history, imperialist nations have sought out this country's resources and were not hesitant to exploit the population to accomplish this end. On of the great ironies in globalization is that the countries richest in resources are the most exploited. Take to the extreme as in Congo, the economy is so crushed that there is no way for the country to recover. 

Gene Gagne's curator insight, November 4, 2015 4:09 PM

Its all about greed. If people only had the respect for each other then with all the natural resources on earth we all could live comfortably.

Kevin Nguyen's curator insight, December 14, 2015 12:40 PM

It's a shame to know that there's a country of hopelessness out there with a potential to be a great one. The long term causes of colonialism had a huge impact on their development as a modern country. They were once a great empire but was diminished down to nothing by the European. Hopefully there will light to the darkness of Congo in the near future.

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How to Interpret a Satellite Image: Five Tips and Strategies

How to Interpret a Satellite Image: Five Tips and Strategies | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
What do you do when presented with a new satellite image? Here's what the Earth Observatory team does to understand the view.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 3, 2014 9:30 AM

Aerial photography can be quite beautiful, as can satellite imagery. These are more than just pretty pictures; interpreting aerial photography and satellite imagery is not easy; here is a great article that gives an introduction on how to interpret satellite imagery. With a little training, satellite images become rich data sources (instead of some visually meaningless data).  Using Stratocam, you can explore and tag some of the amazing place on Earth. 


Tags: mapping, perspective, remote sensing, geospatial, unit 1 Geoprinciples.


Sharrock's curator insight, November 3, 2014 12:05 PM

Seth Dixon's insight:

Aerial photography can be quite beautiful, as cansatellite imagery. These are more than just pretty pictures; interpreting aerial photography and satellite imagery is not easy; here is a great article that gives an introduction on how to interpret satellite imagery. With a little training, satellite images become rich data sources (instead of some visually meaningless data).  Using Stratocam, you can explore and tag some of the amazing place on Earth. 

 

 

Tags: mapping, perspective, remote sensing, geospatial, unit 1 Geoprinciples.

 

Michael Meller's curator insight, November 3, 2014 11:34 PM

Cool

 

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The Strategic Importance of the Caspian Sea

"Stratfor Eurasia Analyst Eugene Chausovsky examines the Caspian Sea's large energy reserves and its conflicting maritime boundaries."


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Matt Ramsdell's curator insight, November 25, 2015 2:48 PM

The Caspian Sea, an area of importance for the middle east, is divided between 5 countries. It was once divided between 2 but was divided post soviet era. The sea is a area of importance because it is a hub of transportation and economic significance for transporting goods and services. Because of the waterway in Azerbaijan they have a significant way of gaining ecnomic growth by controlling the trade in and out of the Caspian sea.  

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 14, 2015 2:09 PM

The Caspian Sea which is bordered by five countries, Russia, Turkmenistan, Iran, Kazakstan and Azerbaijan. The seas importance come from its abundance of resources. It contains large volumes of oil and gas, an estimated 48 billion barrels of oil lies within and 8.7 trillion cubic meters of gas. Much of offshore oil has not been tapped because of disputes over maritime borders. Europe is interested in energy sources as well in the southern corner as a release from Russia's grip. Both Iran and Russia seem to disagree because of the idea of a TransCaspian pipeline.    

Nicholas A. Whitmore's curator insight, December 17, 2015 12:44 PM

The Caspian Sea is an intriguing geopolitical situation. The region was once dominated by the Soviet Union but  after the collapse is shared by multiple countries. Further complicating matters is the sea is full of untapped oil deposits. Territory disputes in such a situation are almost inevitable raising tensions in the region. Azerbaijan also wants to make a deal with Turkmenistan and Europe to move gas through a pipeline to diversify their income and provide Europe and alternative to Russian fuel. Naturally the Russians with the help of Iranians are making this difficult because it would threaten their profits. It seems that  the whole area likely needs a neutral party to try and arrange fair economic usage zones in the area. The Ukrainian conflict has further exasperated this since Europe is sanctioning their key fuel provider which in turn leads to more tension over pipelines. Hopefully all the oil exploitation doesn't also lead to poor environmental consequences such as the Aral sea economic usage. It is clear that central Asia while free from communist rule is still very much tied to Russia and its past decisions.

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Eerie Landforms

Eerie Landforms | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

Utah's Fantasy Canyon features mudstone eroded into bizarre shapes. This one's called "Flying Witch". #Halloween


Tags: physical, geomorphology, erosion, landforms, Utah.


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Urbanisation

Urbanisation | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

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dilaycock's curator insight, October 26, 2014 10:50 PM

A number of audio and video resources on urbanisation in China.

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, July 11, 2015 2:02 AM

A series of short videos covering many aspects of the CHanging Nations / Changing Places (NSW) Units e.g. China's Internal Migration, Shanghai, Mumbai. 


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Waging War Against Global Food Waste

Waging War Against Global Food Waste | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
National Geographic Emerging Explorer Tristram Stuart wants the world to stop throwing away so much good food.

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Deborah Jones's curator insight, October 25, 2014 9:58 AM

PSA

Rebecca McClure's curator insight, November 15, 2014 11:13 PM

Year 9: Food Security

Alex Lewis's curator insight, November 21, 2014 12:18 PM

I think this is a great idea, and the more we reduce our food waste, the better. We can use this food to feed the starving, which would solve two problems at once. Also, the idea of feeding the excess food to the pigs is a good idea. Not as good as conserving the food to give to the needy though. 

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Pumpkin Geography

Pumpkin Geography | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

"During the month of October, I take advantage of the pumpkin harvest to bring hands-on geography to my students.  After spending a month becoming familiar with the location of the seven continents and the major bodies of water, each student is given a pumpkin to turn into a globe. Students paint the entire surface of the pumpkin blue to represent water. Next, they use pushpins to position and trace the outline of each continent onto their pumpkins. They use actual globes as models and are careful to place the continents in the correct hemisphere. Then, they paint and label each continent a different color. They label the major bodies of water and use white paint to represent the North and South Poles."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 22, 2014 8:57 AM

Happy October everyone!  The pictures above (from a friend's website) show how teachers and parents alike can get children involved in a fun craft that will strengthen kids' mental maps--all with a seasonal twist.  If you really love idea of pumpkin globes, you should also see this one.   


Tagsart, K12, fun, seasonal.

Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 23, 2014 9:17 AM

Happy October everyone!  The pictures above (from a friend's website) show how teachers and parents alike can get children involved in a fun craft that will strengthen kids' mental maps--all with a seasonal twist.  If you really love idea of pumpkin globes, you should also see this one.  Besides the fun and games here are some resources to teach the geography behind Thanksgiving.     


Tagsart, K12, fun, seasonal.

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, October 27, 2014 11:14 AM

This is a great use of connecting education and culture. Carving pumpkins is something that most children connect with this season. I think it is an effective strategy to connect these traditions with education. I think its a great way to put a educational spin on a childhood tradition. 

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World Food Day: 10 myths about hunger

World Food Day: 10 myths about hunger | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
How much do you know about global hunger? Carla Kweifio-Okai take a look at some of the biggest food production and nutrition myths

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dilaycock's curator insight, October 16, 2014 5:34 PM

Play the interactive food game.

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Feeding Our Hungry Planet

"By 2050, the world's population will likely increase 35 percent. But is growing more food the only option—or even the best? National Geographic investigates the challenges and solutions to feeding everyone on our planet, based on an eight-month series in National Geographic magazine.  Visit http://natgeofood.com for ongoing coverage of food issues as we investigate the Future of Food today on World Food Day."

 

Tags: sustainability, agriculture, food production, unit 5 agriculture.


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Truthbehere2's curator insight, October 17, 2014 10:30 AM

I think I might as well buy some land and plant my own huge garden for this crap coming up and have a fence around my yard too

Nancy Watson's curator insight, October 19, 2014 8:53 AM

Population increase is just part of the story. How do we feed everyone? How will we provide for the needs of everyone?  Can the earth sustain the use of her resources and the impact of our growing needs and output. First we must eat. Can we learn to do that wisely? 

Bella Reagan's curator insight, November 28, 2014 5:48 PM

Unit 2-Population

 

This video was about the growing population in the world and as a result the growing food demand. This video points out that even though more food production seems like the solution, instead other solutions are more logical. Solutions include reducing wastes, preserving forests, being more productive on current farms and more. It states that farming is a huge business but it goes towards more than growing food for people to eat but also for other things like animals and materials. The worlds population is growing and there needs to be a change in food industries to keep thriving. 

 

This relates to unit 2 about population since it is thinking of ways to adapt to the worlds growing population. By 2050 it is predicted that population will increase by 33% and something has to change about food in order for people to stay fed. There is too much food being wasted that if that could be decreased it could make a huge difference. The video made a good point that it's not that we need more food it's that we need to manage and prioritize production.  

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How Many Flyover States Does It Take to Equal One New York City?

How Many Flyover States Does It Take to Equal One New York City? | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

"Don’t let my New York City–centric comparisons hinder your imagination. The interactive at the top of this page lets you visualize how different parts of the country compare in population density.

Click the button at the bottom of the interactive to select Los Angeles County, for instance, and then click anywhere on the map to generate a (roughly) circular region of (roughly) equal population. The population data come from the 2010 census, and the square mileage was calculated by summing each highlighted county’s total area. You can also use New Jersey (the most densely populated state), Wyoming (the least densely populated state outside of Alaska), Texas, the coasts (the group of all counties that come within 35 miles of either the Atlantic or Pacific oceans), and, yes, New York City as the baseline for your population comparison."

 

Tags: cartography, mapping, visualization, urban, density.


Via Seth Dixon
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Andrew Stoops's curator insight, October 13, 2014 10:16 PM

This map is interesting in that flyover states is something that is not easily defined, at least by me. You could argue that no state is a flyover state because of the industry and businesses within the state itself. I am also curious to know why so few folks live in these areas as I have been to most of these places and they have the social and environmental pull factors important to migration.