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The Geography and Literacy Connection

The Geography and Literacy Connection | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

"What do you think of when you hear the word literacy? Depending on what you teach, chances are geography is not the first thought that comes to mind. But believe it or not, geography and literacy naturally share many similarities. And you can deepen students’ learning in both geography and literacy when they are integrated in the curriculum."


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Tony Aguilar's curator insight, November 4, 2013 12:49 AM

The geography and literacy connection helps new generation student apply common core to better be prepared in the 21st century for vocation and keen awareness of geopgraphy, history and the world around them. Common core allows them to apply critical thinking and connections to the wolrd around them including a thurough understanding of geopgraphy. History and geography are being integrated to apply a different way of preparing students and creating a better awareness of changes in our world. literacy will not only be focused on reading but studying and analyzing data and statistics that help them become better integrated in the world around them.

Ana Melo's curator insight, November 4, 2013 9:41 AM

Geography provides a lot of fundamental knowledge and gives you also a sense of place, which I find very relevant in times of globalization where you belong everywhere and nowhere simultaneously.

Chris Cividino's curator insight, November 8, 2013 12:06 AM

Understanding key terminology in geography is paramount to demonstrating deep knowledge of geographical concepts.

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Geography in the News: Pumpkins

Geography in the News: Pumpkins | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

"Halloween and Thanksgiving are just around the corner and pumpkins are already showing up at roadside stands. Jack o’lanterns, decorative displays and pumpkin pies are the main destinies of most pumpkins in the United States. Elsewhere in the world, however, the pumpkin is nearly exclusively considered a food crop or animal feed."


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Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, November 27, 2013 4:25 PM

I have been a long-time fan of pumpkin coffee, and tomorrow I will probably have some with my cousins and family... Some areas of Asia allow consumption of dogs, other areas of the US allow consumption of roadkill, and that is different from what most people in RI are used to... So I guess, it's not really my business what other people and countries do with their pumpkin crops, as long as it doesn't negatively affect other people.  My neighbor has won some prizes, I think 3rd place in RI for largest pumpkin contests, which is pretty cool, because for several months, you can see their pumpkin garden from my backyard.  Those pumpkins are enormous, and made me wonder if there was anything being done to make the modified pumpkins more usable in food.  I know GMOs are a touchy issue, but to feed the starving people around the world, you have to wonder if one pumpkin at 2000 lbs could feed a village of people.  Lots of people that don't like GMOs probably do unhealthy things in other ways, so their huge activism movements really boggle me.  Labeling GMOs is one thing, but stopping genetic modifications seems as controversial as starting them, especially when some people can benefit from them.  Whatever, I guess pumpkins are cool for whatever people want to do with them, including smashing them... this week on RIC's campus I saw a smashed pumpkin.  The only thing that really popped into my head was not "what a waste," or "oh, those delinquents," but rather "that seems fun."  I did assume though, that no one was hurt by the smashing of the pumpkin...

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, March 19, 2014 5:14 PM

Although you wouldn't think it there are many different countries and specific regions that demonstrate the perfect cropping land and fertilization process to grow pumpkins. Out of the US power house pumpkin growing Illinois is named number 1. Along side California, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvainnia, Mississippi. But lets travel abroad to Africa, now me personally I wouldnt think that there are alot of pumpkin patches in Africa but there are many different places in Africa that pumpkins are grown. SOme of these places are Egypt with (690,000) and then there is South Africa with (378,776). I found these numbers quite interesting because one wouldn't think that there are pumpkin patches in Africa.

Pamela Shields's curator insight, August 29, 2014 10:10 AM

@Danyl †  so inspirational!

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2013 World Population Data Sheet Interactive World Map

2013 World Population Data Sheet Interactive World Map | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

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Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 11, 2013 11:28 AM

By looking at this data sheet you can see that the worlds population will increase by the millions in 2050. These populations will increase in areas that are already very populated and in areas that are not so heavily populated yet. 

Lona Pradeep Parad's curator insight, May 28, 2014 7:00 PM

This is an interactive map where you can click the year you wish and see what the population is or will be. it allows a person to observe and understand population growth better.

Katelyn Sesny's curator insight, October 31, 2014 12:21 PM

A straightforward map that puts previous knowledge (of the rapidly growing population and the limited food supply) into prescriptive. -UNIT 2

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Public Transit Is Worth Way More to a City Than You Might Think

Public Transit Is Worth Way More to a City Than You Might Think | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
A new report finds a hidden economic value of anywhere from $1.5 million to $1.8 billion a year.
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Where 60 Million People in the U.S. Don't Speak English at Home

Where 60 Million People in the U.S. Don't Speak English at Home | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
The number is on the rise.
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Should we be worried?


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Mathijs Booden's comment, September 21, 2013 4:58 AM
Our current predicament in terms of resource depletion, pollution and climate change is mainly due to the industrialized lifestyle of the minority of the world population. Obviously, that's not a result of overpopulation per se.

However, population growth stops when living standards rise. We can't stabilize at 10 billion unless all 10 billion enjoy a reasonable standard of living. Given that even our current resource use is unsustainable, overpopulation is a real issue.
Hongsheng Li's curator insight, September 22, 2013 11:18 PM

人口资源环境承载力

人口过度 or 消费过度

Blake Welborn's curator insight, October 7, 2013 12:49 PM

This fits in well with our population chapter now as this is warning of over population. As the population increases so does need for food, which increases global agriculture and pollution

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9 questions about Syria you were too embarrassed to ask

9 questions about Syria you were too embarrassed to ask | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
Yes, the first question is
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Meredith Garrison's comment, September 12, 2013 7:06 PM
This is obviously a big deaal that needs to be solved really soon. To think that a country is turning against it's own people and killing innocent civilians is hard for me to grasp. Still after reading this, I don't understand why the United States would want to get involved. If all these military options are uneffective why are they even considering it? And if Obama thinks hitting Syria won't even do anything then why is this still an option? All this will do is start a fight with them and waste American lives! That's why i don't understand why we would even need to be in this mess in the first place.
Bri Coins's comment, September 12, 2013 7:09 PM
Obama is in a tight spot. I can see why he wants to help and also try to stop the use of these chemical weapons because its such a hazard to the rest of the world. No body wants to send our troopers over for another war that isnt even really are fight. I personally think we should stay out of this and Obama not send our troops over so we dont have problems with other countries such as Russia.
Connor Howe's comment, September 16, 2013 5:29 PM
1. It is interesting how uninformed people can be yet the jump to conclusions about the things they do not know about. The Syrian Civil War is one of those topics people are making assumptions about both sides when some of them don't even know the country is. On the issue of arming the rebels if you remember in 1980 the United States armed the mujahedeen which was the rebels group off the soviet invasion. The same weapons that we gave them are being used against the U.S. today. The group later became the insurgent forces known as the Taliban
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Satellite eye on Earth: June 2013 – in pictures

Satellite eye on Earth: June 2013 – in pictures | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
Wild fires of Canada and Indonesia, sand storms and steam spewing volcanoes were among the images captured by European Space Agency and Nasa satellites last month

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Chad Ewell's comment, September 13, 2013 11:25 PM
Its incredible how much we can see on maps now a days. Our technology now a days never stops amazing me and this just shows how advanced we actually are in the technology field. This definitely takes maps too a whole new level.
Hoffman's comment, September 14, 2013 1:18 PM
man, and geologists say we see a volcano, or an earthquake. well you could but you wouldn't be there for long.
Byron Northmore's curator insight, November 29, 2013 9:00 AM

CD 4: The human causes and effects of landscape degradation

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40 maps that explain the world

40 maps that explain the world | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
Visualizing everything from the spread of religion to the most racially tolerant countries to the world's writing systems.
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Connor Howe's comment, September 3, 2013 4:56 PM
These map are very cool. They display things that we would not normally know. Some of the maps are very interesting
Alyssa Poague's comment, September 9, 2013 8:47 PM
I discovered new things about the different countries of the world just from viewing and reading these maps. Though I had an idea as to what the maps would reveal when reading the title based on the little knowledge of certain countries, it was still eye-opening just seeing the results that were shown.
Bri Coins's comment, September 12, 2013 7:43 PM
Very interesting! To read about other peoples out look on America and the different comparisons on topics was cool. The maps definitely surprised me, most were some Ive never even seen before! The map that showed "Where people are the most and least racially tolerant" was very cool, and seeing as America has had some racial problems and to see that most of the population was ok with living next to a different raced person was very cool. I think ill personally have a better and different outlook on certain things through out the country and hopefully one day, the world!
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The World Religions Tree

The World Religions Tree | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

Dynamic infographic on world religions (don't be intimidated by the page being in Russian... The graphic is not).


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Olivia G Torres's curator insight, November 30, 2014 6:18 PM

This was super awesome!! It's a diagram that lets you zoom into the branches that are religion. Its really cool to see how different religions derived and how some are connected. I think it's really cool to see how many different branches have been made through out the years and just how far back religions went. I really like that you can see the long and sometimes lost roots of the religion.

Abby Laybourn's curator insight, December 10, 2014 1:25 PM

Although this was kind of hard to read it was interesting to see how different religions are related and where they stem from. 

Marita Viitanen's curator insight, January 31, 6:48 PM

Tämä puu jotakuinkin hämmentää...

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Burka Avenger

"Burka Avenger is a new Pakistani kids' show about a mild-mannered teacher who moonlights as a burka-clad superhero."


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Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, November 5, 2014 8:20 PM

unit 3

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, November 5, 2014 8:25 PM

unit 3

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, November 19, 2014 12:45 PM

There is something to be said about how film and the media can be used as an effective tool to touch on broad cultural ideals. On a related note, I will be attending a conference soon in Boston on social studies education and one of the seminars I will be going to is how to use SciFi movies in the classroom. Ideals like equality, fighting oppression and free speech are timeless and span many cultures, in Pakistan, the Burka Avenger is that area's media outlet to discuss key social topics to young people.

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Population Density

Population Density | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

"[This map's] an unabashedly generalized interactive population density map inspired/stolen from a map by William Bunge entitled Islands of Mankind that I came across on John Krygier‘s blog. I thought Bunge’s map was a novel way to look at population density, and I’ve tried to stay close to the spirit of the original."


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Steven Flis's curator insight, December 17, 2013 12:31 PM

Mindblowing interractive map dealing with the population desinty of the world.  From tinkering around with this ive seen some scary things. As we all know the North East metropolis area is compact with people from rhode island to delaware and everything in between. but when you take the map to 100 people per square to kilomete it almost disapears. This in itself wouldnt be that bad but when you move the image to 500 per kilometer almost the entireity of India is still there. This is a perfect compaitive example of how jam packed south eastern asia is and its actually pretty scary.

Katelyn Sesny's curator insight, October 31, 2014 12:22 PM

While most articles talk about population growth, this article provides factual and visual evidence to show population density. -UNIT 2

michelle sutherland's curator insight, January 28, 8:28 PM

love the map

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Gender Gap Index

Gender Gap Index | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

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Steven Flis's curator insight, December 16, 2013 1:35 PM

No surprise here that the countries that are more well off generally have less of a gender gap. One thing that i like to point out about this article is that the united states came in 23rd which i think is pretty humerous since we pride outselfs on our rights and equality but were not even in the top 20 countries in the world when it comes down to equality between genders. The biggest surprise of this article though has to be nicaragua coming in 10th even though every country around it scored poorly. hopefully the nicaraguans can teach their fellow costa ricans and houndurans how to close the gap.

xavia's comment, April 10, 2014 12:38 AM
gender gap chloropleth
Chris Plummer's curator insight, January 29, 8:30 AM

Summary- This map shows the equality of genders through their economic participation,  health, and access to education. In many poorer places you can see there is a much greater gender gap than in places like scandinavia where there isn't much of a gap at all. I

 

Insight- In Unit 3 one of the main subjects was gender. This chloropleth map shows the relationship between states and their equality among genders. It is easy to tell that in most undeveloped countries there is a much larger gender gap than more developed ones.

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Top 20 Cities for Trick or Treating

Top 20 Cities for Trick or Treating | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
Every year, the candy-loving data heads at Zillow rank the 20-best cities around the country for trick or treaters in search of most candy on the safest streets.
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Inequality and the Gini Coefficient

Inequality and the Gini Coefficient | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
Think everyone should just pull themselves up by their bootstraps? Try this one on for size.

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Heidi Hutchison's curator insight, October 12, 2013 1:46 PM

Just incredibly awesome, but so, so sadly true.

Ms. Harrington's curator insight, October 12, 2013 3:00 PM

Educating in poverty

Alison D. Gilbert's curator insight, October 16, 2013 7:47 AM

Do you find this information surprising?

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Pumpkin Geography

Pumpkin Geography | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

"After spending a month becoming familiar with the location of the seven continents and the major bodies of water, each student is given a pumpkin to turn into a globe. Students paint the entire surface of the pumpkin blue to represent water. Next, they use pushpins to position and trace the outline of each continent onto their pumpkins. They use actual globes as models and are careful to place the continents in the correct hemisphere. Then, they paint and label each continent a different color. They label the major bodies of water and use white paint to represent the North and South Poles."


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Nigel Burke's curator insight, October 15, 2013 9:13 AM

Nice one!

Alison D. Gilbert's curator insight, October 16, 2013 7:51 AM

I love Halloween and all that goes with it, especially pumpkins. This is such a clever idea.

Rebecca Farrea's curator insight, October 21, 2013 1:16 PM

What a fun way to celebrate Halloween in the history/geography classroom.

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Germany Fights Population Drop

Germany Fights Population Drop | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
As German towns work to hide the emptiness, demographers say a similar fate awaits other European countries, with frightening implications for the economy.
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CLIMATE AND WEATHER - what's the difference?

CLIMATE AND WEATHER - what's the difference? | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

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dilaycock's curator insight, September 23, 2013 8:10 AM

Nice example from famous Australian novel, 'Picnic at Hanging Rock,' to illustrate the difference.

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4 Sky Events This Week: Harvest Moon, Green Giant, and Fall Equinox

4 Sky Events This Week: Harvest Moon, Green Giant, and Fall Equinox | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
This week two of the brightest planets join forces, and sky-watchers celebrate the change of seasons with a bright full moon. Saturn and Venus.
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Religious Geographies

Religious Geographies | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

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Jacob Ramsey's comment, September 1, 2013 10:42 PM
Its really interesting how a so many people can collaborate on one topic to bring not only the history of a ideal, but the true history of a long line of people that were a big part of the development of the west in the United States. We always learn about how this and that president did something to help the country expand but it would very interesting to see how we as a country grew from the influences of someone outside of our own society. And not only does this book offer maps but it also includes charts and timelines!
Kendall Belleville's comment, September 2, 2013 5:11 PM
It is really cool to see how much of tho religions are in the United States. it is really nice to see that people are being supportive of them. It is interesting that there are large areas of religion and then some areas have very little.
Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's curator insight, May 29, 2014 12:30 AM

This map conveys the population of Mormons in each state. The sizes of the states are presented as corresponding the the Mormon population in each. The map links to more than what it shows. When you ask why are so many Mormons in Utah you can look into the past of Utah and the past of Mormons and you will find that Mormons settled in Utah following one of their leaders. You can then even ask the question why are Mormons still migrating to Utah or the question why did they stay there. Human geography can help us find the answers to these questions. A shared ideology among the community. A lack of repercussion for being open about their belief. A sense of belonging. Family connections. Human Geography help us unravel these mysteries which were brought to our attention by a simple map.

Regional spaces of Mormon's (such as the rather Formal region of Utah) are shown through the map and show the distribution of Mormonism throughout the world.

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Declining Fertility Rates

Declining Fertility Rates | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
The American birthrate is at a record low. What happens when having it all means not having children?

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Zakkary Catera's comment, September 13, 2013 12:36 AM
Children are our legacy, they are our future, and if the birth rate keeps depleting then who will be here to be pur next scientists or doctors? Then again a plus to this situation is how much lower the birth rate is, the more resources we have to equally share (i.e oil, food water etc.)
Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 11, 2013 11:34 AM

In recent research people found that some women are content with not having any children. People might think this way because without a child people are able to do more things like go out or travel. Some may not want children due to expenses. If more people do not want children birth rates could decline over the years.

Steven Flis's curator insight, December 17, 2013 12:23 PM

Not to bulky on information but it gets its point across. why are theyre so many social stigmas around having a kid?  A kid cost a little over a million dollars to raise why should it be looked down apon for choosing not to take the finacial and physical hardship. I personally have been on the fence about the subject because Im not a fan of this world is coming to and i wouldnt want to have someone I dearly care about to have to go through it. But thats neither hear nor there. 

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In China, one-child policy compounds loss of child for parents

In China, one-child policy compounds loss of child for parents | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
One-child policy leaves some parents childless, hopeless and facing financial ruin in old age.

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Antonio Martinez's comment, September 12, 2013 3:36 PM
I can understand why this law is enforced. The obvious reason is that China has an unusually high population compared to other countries. Although, this law definitely has it's downsides. One being that if your child dies such as in the car accident in the beginning of the article, then you will be childless for the rest of your life.
jacob benner's comment, September 14, 2013 5:11 PM
China is overpopulated and it its becoming a problem, but by forcing parents to only have one child is leading to other problems. The childless parents describe there life to be empty and full of depression and without their child they are running into financial issues. Most of the time it is to late for the parents to have another child.
Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 15, 2014 5:43 PM

I understand the issues China is having with their large population but the one-child policy hurts the average family. Problems occur when a family can only have one child. If anything were to happen to that child, whether he/she dies young, runs away or gets thrown in prison. That can leave the parents vulnerable later in life. When the parents become elderly they may not have a child to take care of them. China must find another way to control their population. 

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Geography in the News: Hot Chocolate

Geography in the News: Hot Chocolate | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
By Neal Lineback and Mandy Lineback Gritzner, Geography in the NewsTM and Maps.com LOVING HOT CHOCOLATE A new type of chocolate came on the market around 2010.

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Alissa Charalambous's comment, August 21, 2013 2:41 PM
Wow I had no idea that hot chocolate could be so beneficial! Who knew that it could slow the aging process and prevent wrinkles! Not to mention, it also hydrates your skin! I always drink hot chocolate in the winter, but now that I know it has some positive factors, I will definitely be drinking more when it starts to get cold again!
Mary Coates's comment, August 29, 2013 2:45 PM
I had heard before that "chocolate was good for you." I think they meant to say "cocoa was good for your skin." I'm pretty sure M&M's aren't as "good for you" as fruit, but they definitely have thier benefits an it's a good excuse to be able to eat tons of chocolate! I'm glad I got that cleared up as to IF chocolate was good for me.
miranda's comment, September 8, 2013 1:31 PM
I loved reading this article. It was very intriguing because I always read about chocolate being bad for your skin and just awful for your overall health but this article showed it is good for keeping your skin young and not old and wrinkly. I also found out that coco is not the official name for the chocolate bean it is actually called a cacao bean. It is called coco because it was easier to spell. Now since I have learned all this I think chocolate should be eaten once a day! -Miranda Delaney
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Iran's 'Jerusalem Day': Behind the rallies and rhetoric

Iran's 'Jerusalem Day': Behind the rallies and rhetoric | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
Iran's annual al-Quds - or Jerusalem - Day, denouncing Israel, is as much an expression of policy as ritual, writes BBC Persian's Siavash Ardalan.

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Nathan Chasse's curator insight, April 1, 2014 12:43 PM

This article describes Iran's "Jerusalem Day," a day in which people gather in the streets to voice their denial and hatred of the nation of Israel. The day has become a tradition and politicians make sound byte laden speeches to rally support.

Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 4, 2014 8:39 PM

The people of Iran gather to celebrate Jerusalem Day. Each year millions of people come together to express their hatred towards Israel and support towards Palestinians. They rally and some people including politicians give speeches. Speeches by President Ahmadinejad even included the denial of the holocaust.  

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 3:19 PM

This day is pro-Palestinian and is a must-go-to event for politicians. Any politician that wants to be heard or even listened to in the future must make their way to this parade of protests and Iranian rituals.