FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY
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How one German millennial chose to live on trains rather than pay rent

How one German millennial chose to live on trains rather than pay rent | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

"When others get off the train to finally go home, Leonie Müller stays behind. That's because she already is home: The train is her apartment, and she says she likes it that way. She bought a subscription that allows her to board every train in the country free. Now, Müller washes her hair in the train bathroom and writes her college papers while traveling at a speed of up to 190 mph. She says that she enjoys the liberty she has experienced since she gave up her apartment."


Tags: mobility, transportation, housing, popular culture, Europe, Germany. 


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Mark Hathaway's curator insight, October 9, 2015 9:46 AM

This is no question that living on a train is a radical decision to make. It is a direct challenge to the idea that you are suppose to settle into one particular area. While I doubt that this specific phenomenon will catch on, our society is becoming more mobile.  People are becoming less tied down to one specific area. The Millennial generation is changing many of the previous social norms. The Millennial generation is waiting longer than any previous generation to marry and start a family. Many are even questioning the institution of marriage itself.  Members of the older generations, will decry these changes. This is a familiar cycle that occurs through out history. The Older generation always decries the changes instituted by the Younger generation.

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Food Waste

Producers, sellers, and consumers waste tons of food. John Oliver discusses the shocking amount of food we don’t eat.

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FCHSAPGEO's insight:

Food waste is a tragedy that we all know happens, but the economic system does not work efficiently to maximize the global food production (Disclaimer: it is HBO's John Oliver, so there is some language and references that might not be appropriate for all audiences). 


Tags: food, agriculture, consumption, sustainability, video, unit 5 agriculture.

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Jose Soto's curator insight, August 5, 2015 9:21 PM

Food waste is a tragedy that we all know happens, but the economic system does not work efficiently to maximize the global food production (Disclaimer: it is HBO's John Oliver, so there is some language and references that might not be appropriate for all audiences). 

 

Tags: food, agriculture, consumption, sustainability, video, unit 5 agriculture.

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, August 6, 2015 4:20 AM

Food waste is a tragedy that we all know happens, but the economic system does not work efficiently to maximize the global food production (Disclaimer: it is HBO's John Oliver, so there is some language and references that might not be appropriate for all audiences). 


Tags: food, agriculture, consumption, sustainability, video, unit 5 agriculture.

Sue Byrnes's curator insight, August 6, 2015 6:06 PM

Food waste is a tragedy that we all know happens, but the economic system does not work efficiently to maximize the global food production (Disclaimer: it is HBO's John Oliver, so there is some language and references that might not be appropriate for all audiences). 

 

Tags: food, agriculture, consumption, sustainability, video, unit 5 agriculture.

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Overpopulation, overconsumption – in pictures

Overpopulation, overconsumption – in pictures | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
How do you raise awareness about population explosion? One group thought that the simplest way would be to show people

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Sally Egan's curator insight, November 23, 2015 6:30 PM

Global challenges

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Hampton Roads cities among 2015's best and worst to raise a family

Hampton Roads cities among 2015's best and worst to raise a family | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
Source: WalletHub Planning a big move? Before you pack your bags,check out some of the best and worst places to raise a family. According to Wallethub.com, two Hampton Roads cities made the top ten...
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The Earthquake That Will Devastate Seattle

The Earthquake That Will Devastate Seattle | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
When the giant fault line along the Pacific Northwest ruptures, it could be our worst natural disaster ever.

 

The Cascadia subduction zone remained hidden from us for so long because we could not see deep enough into the past. It poses a danger to us today because we have not thought deeply enough about the future. The Cascadia situation, a calamity in its own right, is also a parable for this age of ecological reckoning, and the questions it raises are ones that we all now face. How should a society respond to a looming crisis of uncertain timing but of catastrophic proportions? How can it begin to right itself when its entire infrastructure and culture developed in a way that leaves it profoundly vulnerable to natural disaster?


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Diane Johnson's curator insight, July 30, 2015 10:33 PM

This is a long read but well worth the time. "The really big one," an earthquake in the Pacific Northwest over 8.0, last happened in 1700, but seismologists know that the geological pressure on the fault lines have been building since then.  This in not a panic-inducing article, but one reminding people that the most potent natural disasters operate on cycles much longer than our lifetimes.    


Tags: disasters, physical, tectonics.

aitouaddaC's curator insight, August 3, 2015 8:42 AM

This is a long read but well worth the time. "The really big one," an earthquake in the Pacific Northwest over 8.0, last happened in 1700, but seismologists know that the geological pressure on the fault lines have been building since then.  This in not a panic-inducing article, but one reminding people that the most potent natural disasters operate on cycles much longer than our lifetimes.    

 

Tags: disasters, physical, tectonics.

geographynerd's curator insight, August 9, 2015 2:20 AM

This is a long read but well worth the time. "The really big one," an earthquake in the Pacific Northwest over 8.0, last happened in 1700, but seismologists know that the geological pressure on the fault lines have been building since then.  This in not a panic-inducing article, but one reminding people that the most potent natural disasters operate on cycles much longer than our lifetimes.    

 

Tags: disasters, physical, tectonics.

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Global Refugee Crisis

"This video shows you why the refugees crossing the Mediterranean by boat can't just fly to Europe."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 18, 2015 2:30 PM

Not since the end of World War II have there been so many refugees seeking safety.  There are several regional hot spots of political, ethnic and religious turmoil; many are now asking how the global community should response to the worst refugee crisis in generations.


Tags: migration, political, refugees.

Bonnie Bracey Sutton's curator insight, June 19, 2015 9:35 AM

Global population shakeup.

Nancy Watson's curator insight, June 19, 2015 10:14 AM

Population-refugee,asylum seeker, not internally displaced person. FRQ #3 2015

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40 Ways The World Makes Awesome Hot Dogs

40 Ways The World Makes Awesome Hot Dogs | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

"It’s not just a sausage in a bun; it’s a beautiful blank canvas. It’s a hot dog, which is a foodstuff eaten worldwide. Here are 40 distinctive varieties from around the globe — from iconic NYC 'dirty water dogs' to fully loaded South American street-cart dogs to Japanese octo-dogs. There is a tubesteak out there for every craving that ever was."


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Jose Soto's curator insight, August 5, 2015 9:50 PM

The 4th of July is the day of Coney Island's Hot Dog eating contest and the quintessential day to have a barbeque in the United States.  Some see the hot dog as a mere symbol of the uniformity of globalized culture in the 21st century that diffused out from the United States.  There is much more to be seen in the globalization of food.  Yes, the global goes to the whole world, but distinct places make this global cultural trait intensely local.  For example the hot dogs in Cincinnati are famous for being topped with chili and an obscene quantity of cheese, but in Costa Rica, I learned to love eating hot dogs deep fried, topped with cabbage, mayo and ketchup, just like the Ticos.  Food is but one example of this phenomena known as glocalization, where diffusion and divergence keep the world both global and local. 

 

Tags: food, culture, diffusion, globalization, consumption.

Adrian Bahan (MNPS)'s curator insight, March 14, 8:10 PM

The 4th of July is the day of Coney Island's Hot Dog eating contest and the quintessential day to have a barbeque in the United States.  Some see the hot dog as a mere symbol of the uniformity of globalized culture in the 21st century that diffused out from the United States.  There is much more to be seen in the globalization of food.  Yes, the global goes to the whole world, but distinct places make this global cultural trait intensely local.  For example the hot dogs in Cincinnati are famous for being topped with chili and an obscene quantity of cheese, but in Costa Rica, I learned to love eating hot dogs deep fried, topped with cabbage, mayo and ketchup, just like the Ticos.  Food is but one example of this phenomena known as glocalization, where diffusion and divergence keep the world both global and local. 


Tags: food, culture, diffusion, globalization, consumption.

Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks's curator insight, March 14, 11:05 PM

The 4th of July is the day of Coney Island's Hot Dog eating contest and the quintessential day to have a barbeque in the United States.  Some see the hot dog as a mere symbol of the uniformity of globalized culture in the 21st century that diffused out from the United States.  There is much more to be seen in the globalization of food.  Yes, the global goes to the whole world, but distinct places make this global cultural trait intensely local.  For example the hot dogs in Cincinnati are famous for being topped with chili and an obscene quantity of cheese, but in Costa Rica, I learned to love eating hot dogs deep fried, topped with cabbage, mayo and ketchup, just like the Ticos.  Food is but one example of this phenomena known as glocalization, where diffusion and divergence keep the world both global and local. 


Tags: food, culture, diffusion, globalization, consumption.

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Political Symbolism in the Religious Landscape

This is a great juxtaposition of communal identities. Before becoming a part of Canada, this was the Cathedral of St. James. As a part of the British Empire, places such as Victoria Square became a part of the Montreal landscape. In what appears to me as a symbolic strike back against the British Monarchy's supremacy, this Cathedral is renamed Marie-Reine-du-Monde (Mary, Queen of the World). The fact that the Hotel Queen Elizabeth is looming overhead only heightens the tensions regarding whose queen reigns supreme; this isn't the real issue. The dueling queens served as a proxy for tensions between British political control and French cultural identity in Quebec several generations ago.


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 12, 2015 4:43 PM

I was recently in Montreal; my last few Instagram posts aren't the prettiest pictures of my time in Canada.  I tried to select images that represented geographic concepts and would be the things I'd mention if we were on a walking tour of the city. 


TagsCanadasocial media, urban, economic, images, placeculture, landscape, tourism

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My daughter can’t read a map. And your kid probably can’t either

My daughter can’t read a map. And your kid probably can’t either | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
Ask any teenager for directions and he can pull up Google Maps quicker than you can recite an address. Pretty awesome, right? And I’ll be the first to admit that having a map in my phone that not only tells me where to turn but how long it will take me to get there is pretty amazing. I use it all the time, honestly. But even when I’m zoning out and listening to that soothing voice telling me where to turn, I have a mental picture in my head of her directions. And I never realized that my teenage daughter doesn’t have a map in her head, because she’s never really had to use one. Ever.

 

Tags: education, K12, geography education, spatial, mapping.


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Cade Johns's curator insight, August 16, 2015 9:26 PM

I think maps on your phone is great but what about if you get lost and you don't have service on your phone then what are you gonna do?Most young people have never had to read an actual map so most likely they won't be able to find their way back to civilization. CJ

Ethan Conner's curator insight, August 17, 2015 8:56 AM

Many people cannot read maps because of technolagy. This new form of maps are keeping children from the traditional way. Also keeping them from education.

Aaron Burnette's curator insight, August 26, 2015 9:50 AM

Although cell phone and technology is helpful, other people still believe in the prideful way. Reading paper maps.

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27 hilariously bad maps that explain nothing

27 hilariously bad maps that explain nothing | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
Tellingly, the bulk of the collection comes from cable TV news.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 3, 2015 1:39 PM

Some of these are awfully, some are unintentionally awesome, but I think the one above might be even better than that.  It's as if the cartographer in this one is purposefully making that gives us no knew information in the least informative way possible on purpose to make a snarky critique on the abundance of ill-conceived maps out there.   

Jose Soto's curator insight, August 5, 2015 9:50 PM

Some of these are awfully, some are unintentionally awesome, but I think the one above might be even better than that.  It's as if the cartographer in this one is purposefully making that gives us no knew information in the least informative way possible on purpose to make a snarky critique on the abundance of ill-conceived maps out there.   

Flaviu Fesnic's curator insight, August 6, 2015 2:51 AM

Some of these are awfully, some are unintentionally awesome, but I think the one above might be even better than that.  It's as if the cartographer in this one is purposefully making that gives us no knew information in the least informative way possible on purpose to make a snarky critique on the abundance of ill-conceived maps out there.   

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Florida, before Disney

Florida, before Disney | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
Watch Mike Wallace's 60 Minutes report from 1972 to see the Florida that existed before Mickey and millions of tourists descended on Orlando.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 14, 2015 9:08 PM

This 11 minute video from the archives is a great profile of a community in flux.  Orange County, Florida was transitioning from an agricultural region off the grid to a largest tourist destination in the United States.  Obviously, the community's economic geography completely transformed, but the cultural shift to the region was equally drastic.  Since Disney today is such a well-known brand and so many students have been to Disney World, they will enjoy seeing what the community was like before it became an entertainment mecca. 


Tags: place, tourism, economichistorical.

Rebecca Cofield's curator insight, August 5, 2015 6:10 PM

This 11 minute video from the archives is a great profile of a community in flux.  Orange County, Florida was transitioning from an agricultural region off the grid to a largest tourist destination in the United States.  Obviously, the community's economic geography completely transformed, but the cultural shift to the region was equally drastic.  Since Disney today is such a well-known brand and so many students have been to Disney World, they will enjoy seeing what the community was like before it became an entertainment mecca. 

 

Tags: place, tourism, economic, historical.

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National Parks: America's Greatest Classrooms

"The National Park Service has a new website, designed just for educators.  This short video showcases how teachers can use this website in the classroom."  www.nps.gov/teachers


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 28, 2014 7:14 PM

Field Trips in a National Park can be an incredible experience in a outstanding learning environment.  The National Park Service has produced many lesson plans, videos, distant learning programs, and resources for teachers to give them opportunities to experience the National Parks online.  These resources are available for a wide range of subjects and grade levels.  Where is the nearest U.S. National Park to your community?     

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Illuminating North Korea

Illuminating North Korea | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
A photographer parts the curtains on one of the world’s least-known places and brings back pictures of a country that is defined for many by mystery and war.
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In California, Millions of ‘Shade Balls’ Combat a Nagging Drought

In California, Millions of ‘Shade Balls’ Combat a Nagging Drought | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
Ninety-six million little balls in the Los Angeles Reservoir will help block sunlight and UV rays that promote algae growth, helping to keep drinking water safe.
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How religion(s) spread across the world

How religion(s) spread across the world | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
VIDEO: 5,000 years of religious history in two minutes.

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FCHSAPGEO's insight:

Short, sweet and to the point--this video is a great way to show the historical geographies of major world religions.  What are the cultural barriers to the diffusion of one of these particular religions?  What geographic factors helped to facilitate the expansion of one of these world religions?   

 

Tags: religion, diffusion, culture, Christianity, Islam, Buddhism, Hinduism, Judaism,
unit 3 culture.

 

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Clayton Nelson's curator insight, March 16, 9:53 AM
This video is extremely easy to watch but at the same time gives a lot of information. Very helpful! CN
Clayton Nelson's comment, April 4, 10:09 AM
It is amazing to see how quickly some religions spread compared to others especially once the Islamic religion began. Also i believe its a great thing that during the age of discovery, religions were taken over to the new world with those who traveled there.
Alexis Michelle's curator insight, April 4, 10:11 AM

Short, sweet and to the point--this video is a great way to show the historical geographies of major world religions. Each of these religions have been "born" somewhere and have grown to different countries. Everyone has a religion well most of everyone and I believe it is very important to know the history of the religion that you are or fit into.


Tags: religion, diffusion, culture, Christianity, Islam, Buddhism, Hinduism, Judaism,
unit 3 culture.


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The Richest Person In Every State

The Richest Person In Every State | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
It’s a question we were asked often enough that it deserved an answer. So for the first time ever, FORBES offers a unique road map to wealth in America with a list of the richest person in each state.



In New York, the richest is lightning-rod industrialist David Koch. On the opposite coast,
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Why eating insects makes sense

The world's population is projected to reach 11 billion by the end of the century. Feeding that many people will be a challenge, and it is further complicated by the impact of climate change on agriculture. That is why some people advocate an unusual way to boost the food supply and feed people sustainably: by eating less meat, and more insects.

http://econ.st/1sDYlfM


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LEONARDO WILD's curator insight, June 8, 2015 9:33 AM

When speaking of sustainability, many seek new options, new and more efficient—productively speaking—ways of exploiting resources, different types of energies to make up for the missing future expected quota. However, at not point do they seem to ask themselves what makes inefficiency be the norm, and scarcity the automatic reason to why we need more. The solution is right there, in front of our eyes, and not necessarily in the form of insects., though under the current monetary and economic paradigm, that may seem like a good option.

Nancy Watson's curator insight, June 19, 2015 10:18 AM

Agriculture, Food security, sustainability, Culture - Yuck factor!

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, March 16, 3:31 PM

While it might make economic, nutritional, and environmental sense, I'm sure that many are squeamish at the idea of insects primarily because in violates many deeply engrained cultural taboos.  The main reasons listed in the video for promoting the production and consumption of more insects:

  1. Insects are healthier than meat.
  2. It is cheap (or free) to raise insects.
  3. Raising insects is more sustainable than livestock.

 

Questions to Ponder: Would you be willing to try eating insects?  How do you think this idea would go over with your family and friends?  What cultural barriers might slow the diffusion of this practice?    

 

Tagsfoodculturediffusioncultural norms, economic, food production, agriculture.

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Ramadan in Sweden with no dusk, no dawn

Ramadan in Sweden with no dusk, no dawn | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
During summer, the sun never sets in Sweden's northernmost town, posing challenges for Muslims observing the holy month.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 17, 2015 2:35 PM

Like many early religious traditions, Ramadan is observed based on measurements from the moon and sun. The start of Ramadan is determined by the sighting of the new moon, which moves about 11 days back in the Gregorian calendar each year. During Ramadan the consumption of food and water is prohibited between dawn and dusk, how do Muslims observing the fast manage in the far north of Scandinavia, where the sun never sets in the summertime (in 2015, Ramadan is from June 17 to July 17)?  Some Muslims in the West (and north) argue that ancient customs from the Arabian desert need updating now that the religion has diffused beyond the Middle East.    


Tags: Islam, perspective, religiondiffusion, culture.

Lindley Amarantos's curator insight, August 6, 2015 3:57 PM

Like many early religious traditions, Ramadan is observed based on measurements from the moon and sun. The start of Ramadan is determined by the sighting of the new moon, which moves about 11 days back in the Gregorian calendar each year. During Ramadan the consumption of food and water is prohibited between dawn and dusk, how do Muslims observing the fast manage in the far north of Scandinavia, where the sun never sets in the summertime (in 2015, Ramadan is from June 17 to July 17)?  Some Muslims in the West (and north) argue that ancient customs from the Arabian desert need updating now that the religion has diffused beyond the Middle East.    


Tags: Islam, perspective, religion, diffusion, culture.

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Gender equity in sports

Gender equity in sports | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

"Yesterday the United States Women’s Soccer Team defeated Japan 5-2 in the FIFA Women’s World Cup Final in Vancouver, claiming their third world title. The event was watched by soccer fans around the country, and was called a “ratings knockout” but couldn't come close to those drawn by men’s soccer in Brazil last summer...while some states have made great strides in reducing this gender gap, others still have great inequity that needs to be addressed to effectively celebrate and give potential American female athletes the opportunities they deserve to succeed."

 

Tags: sport, gender, popular culture, mapping, regions, the South, culture.


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Alexander Yakovlev's comment, July 8, 2015 10:08 AM
This article talks about how not many men are interested in watching women’s sport. I think gender inequity is a major problem in general, not only in sports. Police officers are mostly men as well, as well as many high ranked jobs. We just need to keep working on it as a nation and think that the women who are being discriminated are women of our nation.
Rob Duke's comment, July 9, 2015 1:42 AM
Alex, I worked for a Chief that allowed job sharing, so that women officers who wanted to do so could share a job with both getting benefits, but only working part-time in order to have more time with family. It was a great way to improve the ratio of male to female officers.
Cultural Infusion's curator insight, August 24, 2015 10:13 PM

An important issue of our time is the gap between women and men not only in pay and workplace equality but sports and athletics also. With such a huge presence of many strong, dominate female sporting teams, the question needs to be asked, what more can we do to give these women the recognition and respect of which they deserve?

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Urbanization in China

China's citizens are moving from the countryside into cities in record numbers, boosting the economy but making party leaders uneasy

 

Tags: economic, planning, urban, China, East Asia.


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François Arnal's curator insight, July 17, 2015 4:15 AM
Seth Dixon's insight:

A big portion of China's economic boom the last few decades has been linked to the transformation of what used to be a predominantly agrarian civilization to an economic engine fueled by rapid urbanization.  This 2011 video from the Economist is still highly relevant today.   

 

@Céline

Vincent Lahondère's curator insight, July 18, 2015 9:02 AM

Une courte vidéo de la revue The Economist

Lindley Amarantos's curator insight, August 6, 2015 3:54 PM

A big portion of China's economic boom the last few decades has been linked to the transformation of what used to be a predominantly agrarian civilization to an economic engine fueled by rapid urbanization.  This 2011 video from the Economist is still highly relevant today.   

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World Literacy Map: Literacy Rate Adult Total of People Ages 15 and Above

World Literacy Map: Literacy Rate Adult Total of People Ages 15 and Above | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
Percentage of a country's population that can read and write. Country's define literacy age between 7 and 20 years old. The standard age for literacy most countries is 15 years of age.

 

Tags: education, K12, development, map, worldwide.


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Annenkov's curator insight, August 5, 2015 4:29 PM

My 10 year-old daughter was looking in our atlas a while back (yes, she is my daughter) and in the encyclopedic entry of each country she started noticing that literacy rates were included.  She started asking about which regions had higher and lower literacy rates. This became a teaching moment about the power of the map--I explained that all this data can be more easily accessed and seen on a map and this interactive map is what we discovered.  We need to help student find the maps and data to answer their questions (and we need to make sure that they are curious enough to ask questions about the way the world works).  

Lindley Amarantos's curator insight, August 6, 2015 3:53 PM

My 10 year-old daughter was looking in our atlas a while back (yes, she is my daughter) and in the encyclopedic entry of each country she started noticing that literacy rates were included.  She started asking about which regions had higher and lower literacy rates. This became a teaching moment about the power of the map--I explained that all this data can be more easily accessed and seen on a map and this interactive map is what we discovered.  We need to help student find the maps and data to answer their questions (and we need to make sure that they are curious enough to ask questions about the way the world works).  

geographynerd's curator insight, August 9, 2015 2:21 AM

My 10 year-old daughter was looking in our atlas a while back (yes, she is my daughter) and in the encyclopedic entry of each country she started noticing that literacy rates were included.  She started asking about which regions had higher and lower literacy rates. This became a teaching moment about the power of the map--I explained that all this data can be more easily accessed and seen on a map and this interactive map is what we discovered.  We need to help student find the maps and data to answer their questions (and we need to make sure that they are curious enough to ask questions about the way the world works).  

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Inside the Secret World of Russia’s Cold War Mapmakers

Inside the Secret World of Russia’s Cold War Mapmakers | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
The Soviet military mapped the entire world, but few have seen the actual, physical maps—until now.

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Why India and Bangladesh have the world's craziest border

Why India and Bangladesh have the world's craziest border | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
On July 31st India and Bangladesh will exchange 162 parcels of land, each of which happens to lie on the wrong side of the Indo-Bangladesh border. The end of these enclaves follows an agreement made between India and Bangladesh on June 6th. The territories along the world’s craziest border include the pièce de résistance of strange geography: the world’s only “counter-counter-enclave”: a patch of India surrounded by Bangladeshi territory, inside an Indian enclave within Bangladesh. How did the enclaves come into existence?The enclaves are invisible on most maps; most are invisible on the ground too. But they became an evident problem for their 50,000-odd inhabitants with the emergence of passport and visa controls. Independent India and Bangladesh—part of Pakistan until 1971—each refused to let the other administer its exclaves, leaving their people effectively stateless.According to Reece Jones, a political geographer, the plots were cut from larger territories by treaties signed in 1711 and 1713 between the maharaja of Cooch Behar and the Mughal emperor in Delhi, bringing to an end a series of minor wars.It was partition, the division of India and Pakistan, that turned the enclaves into a no-man’s-land. The Hindu maharaja of Cooch Behar chose to join India in 1949 and he brought with him the ex-Mughal, ex-British possessions he inherited. Enclaves on the other side of the new border were swallowed (but not digested) by East Pakistan, which later became Bangladesh.

 

Tags: borders, geopolitics, political, India, South Asia, Bangladesh.


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Stephen Zimmett's curator insight, July 22, 2015 12:32 PM
Another great scoop by Seth Dixon
Alex Vielman's curator insight, December 15, 2015 12:10 AM

The images in the above article truly define how the geography of an area can not last forever. Maps are continuously changing and the border changing of Bangladesh and India is a clear example. In the map giving, we can see that there is an odd circular border forming inside of what seems or should be Bangladesh territory in the upper North of India. Because of the zigging and zagging, the border along these two country is the fifth longest in the world. It is important to understand how and why territories and regions are divided, and also the affects it has for the people in the region. Since establishing a proper border is in the works between the two countries, this will allow  residents in the region, who can now choose which country to join. The overall matter is to provide a more simpler border line without a border battle. 

Rescooped by FCHSAPGEO from Geography Education
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Bad Maps Are Everywhere These Days. Here's How to Avoid Being Fooled

Bad Maps Are Everywhere These Days. Here's How to Avoid Being Fooled | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
Tips from a geographer who's seen it all.


Tags:  mapping, cartography, 201, perspective, map.


Via Seth Dixon
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lackingingot's comment, June 30, 2015 2:58 AM
Excellent...!!
Kevin Barker's curator insight, June 30, 2015 10:35 AM

Excellent article with examples for exploring the ways in which maps can fail or mislead us.  This is particularly important considering how easily maps can be created by anyone through the availability of digital resources.

Angus Henderson's curator insight, July 2, 2015 2:04 AM

A mapping 'take-down' of great detail, with lots of of interesting linked examples