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Documentary: Last Train Home

Documentary: Last Train Home | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

Every spring, China's cities are plunged into chaos as 130 million migrant workers journey to their home villages for the New Year in the world's largest human migration.

 

I've posted in the past about this documentary which portrays the The cultural importance of New Year's in China and the massive corresponding migratory shifts that take place.  What is new is that the 85 minute documentary is now available online.  "Last Train Home takes viewers on a heart-stopping journey with the Zhangs, a couple who left infant children behind for factory jobs 16 years ago, hoping their wages would lift their children to a better life. They return to a family growing distant and a daughter longing to leave school for unskilled work. As the Zhangs navigate their new world, Last Train Home paints a rich, human portrait of China's rush to economic development."

 

Tags: China, EastAsia, migration, development, labor, development, transportation, unit 2 population.


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Betty Denise's comment, October 10, 2012 10:29 AM
The request video is not available ...
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Countries with the Most Migrants

Countries with the Most Migrants | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

List of the countries with the most migrants in the world as measured by net migration rate.


Which countries have the most migrants per capita living there?  What spatial or development patterns do you see on this list?  


Tags: Migration, population, Immigration, statistics, worldwide, unit 2 population. 


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Lauren Sellers's curator insight, May 22, 9:04 AM

This is an interesting little chart because it reveals to us which countries have the highest percentage of migrants that make up their general population. Definitely suprised me to see Qatar as the number one on the list, I would have expected the US to be at the top, but it is not even in the top 10!

Lona Pradeep Parad's curator insight, May 28, 4:26 PM

This shows the net migration of immigrants. 

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Geographic Ignorance

Chelsie Hightower is confused on DWTS. Helio Castroneves does his best to educate her. Does he succeed? LET'S FIND OUT.

 

This is painful, but highlights once again why everyone should learn some basic geography.  

 

Tags: GeographyEducation, video.


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Kalin B.'s comment, November 5, 2012 8:31 AM
It's somewhat depressing to see when people don't grasp the very world they inhabit.
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What Would Happen If The Entire World Lived Like Americans?

What Would Happen If The Entire World Lived Like Americans? | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

After making an infographic depicting how much space would be needed to house the entire world’s population based on the densities of various global cities, Tim De Chant of Per Square Mile got to thinking about the land resources it takes to support those same cities.


Tags: consumption, development, resources, energy, density, sustainability.


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Michelle Carvajal's comment, September 18, 2012 3:23 PM
Its very interesting that the United Arab Emirates would need more land mass than lets say China and the US. I guess what I'm trying to say is that the common misconception of people is that China has the greatest population. I definetely will rescoop this because people could actually see how hard it must be to house people who in essence would need all this land mass to live comfortably.
Thomas D's comment, April 22, 2013 1:13 PM
I thought that this was a very interesting graph and article to read. It shows that if the rest of the world lived like us Americans we would need four times the world’s surface, which is pretty substantial to think about. Although the United Arab Emirates is the leading this graph it’s hard to believe that America is in second. This goes to show that our way of living is out of hand, that the only reason we haven’t consumed everything is because the rest of the world is living of more reasonable amounts of resources or no resources at all. That we need to be as a country more conservative of our resources before we have to rely even more heavily than we already do on other countries. I was surprised to see that India has such a small percentage of resource consummation considering it is such a highly populated country.
Brianna Simao's comment, April 30, 2013 7:23 PM
Countries with a more advanced and urbanized way of life clearly would need more space to survive but if everyone lived like these more developed countries then natural selection dies and survival of the fittest takes over. Eventually all the natural resources would be used up. If they all continued to use the same amount and reproduce then the fertility rate would rapidly increase making the area overpopulated and the quality of life decreased. It is a good thing the entire world lives differently and has a diverse ecological footprint because it creates a balance in the world. As one country’s consumption is out of control another is holding down the fort because they lice more reasonably. It is interesting to see that even though China and India have the largest populations they don’t consume as many resources as the United States and the United Arab Emirates.
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If the world’s population lived in one city…

If the world’s population lived in one city… | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

This is an very intriguing map that shows different urban layouts and applies the concept of population density at the city scale and compares it to the global population.  What is everyone lived in the city of New York (at New York's population density)?  How big would that city be? 


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London Urban Form 3D Map

Visualisation of the density and function of the built-environment in Greater London 2010. Shows the dominance of the intensifying city-centre, corridors of commercial development and the smaller scale centres in Outer London.

 

This is a fantastic way to visually comprehend the spatial urban patterns and densities of a world city like London.


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World must work out how to cope with ageing: UN

World must work out how to cope with ageing: UN | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

From the baby boom to the greying boom, how can we achieve balance in the population paradox? This is a question that must be addressed soon.


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Social Media and Place

Social Media and Place | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
Facebook most social cities: People everywhere use Facebook to check in to places. Here you can see the 5 top hotspots of the most "social"cities.

 

Questions to ponder: What attributes do these commonly 'checked into' landmarks have in common?  Are you surprised that some are or are not on the list?

 

Tags: socialmedia, place, tourism, infographic, London, NYC, Paris.


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The baby bust continues: Births down for 4th year

The baby bust continues: Births down for 4th year | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
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The State of Women in the World

The State of Women in the World | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

Tags: gender, development, worldwide, poverty.


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Lauren Jacquez's curator insight, February 12, 2013 10:39 AM

Gender Development index - CHapter 9 materials

Amy Marques's curator insight, July 2, 2013 8:09 AM

This is a great represenaton for showing the unfortunate truth of the state women in the world today.

Shelby Porter's curator insight, November 4, 2013 8:15 AM

Why are women so unequal to men? Why are women in the Middle East seeing such bad treatment and unequality? How can we fix these problems?

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What Would Happen If The Entire World Lived Like Americans?

What Would Happen If The Entire World Lived Like Americans? | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

After making an infographic depicting how much space would be needed to house the entire world’s population based on the densities of various global cities, Tim De Chant of Per Square Mile got to thinking about the land resources it takes to support those same cities.


Tags: consumption, development, resources, energy, density, sustainability.


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Michelle Carvajal's comment, September 18, 2012 3:23 PM
Its very interesting that the United Arab Emirates would need more land mass than lets say China and the US. I guess what I'm trying to say is that the common misconception of people is that China has the greatest population. I definetely will rescoop this because people could actually see how hard it must be to house people who in essence would need all this land mass to live comfortably.
Thomas D's comment, April 22, 2013 1:13 PM
I thought that this was a very interesting graph and article to read. It shows that if the rest of the world lived like us Americans we would need four times the world’s surface, which is pretty substantial to think about. Although the United Arab Emirates is the leading this graph it’s hard to believe that America is in second. This goes to show that our way of living is out of hand, that the only reason we haven’t consumed everything is because the rest of the world is living of more reasonable amounts of resources or no resources at all. That we need to be as a country more conservative of our resources before we have to rely even more heavily than we already do on other countries. I was surprised to see that India has such a small percentage of resource consummation considering it is such a highly populated country.
Brianna Simao's comment, April 30, 2013 7:23 PM
Countries with a more advanced and urbanized way of life clearly would need more space to survive but if everyone lived like these more developed countries then natural selection dies and survival of the fittest takes over. Eventually all the natural resources would be used up. If they all continued to use the same amount and reproduce then the fertility rate would rapidly increase making the area overpopulated and the quality of life decreased. It is a good thing the entire world lives differently and has a diverse ecological footprint because it creates a balance in the world. As one country’s consumption is out of control another is holding down the fort because they lice more reasonably. It is interesting to see that even though China and India have the largest populations they don’t consume as many resources as the United States and the United Arab Emirates.
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How The USA Expanded In One Mesmerizing Animated GIF

How The USA Expanded In One Mesmerizing Animated GIF | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

Amazing work from wikipedia, summarizing the evolution of the US formation, originally here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Territorial_evolution_of_the_United_States

 

Tags: USA, historical, visualization. 


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Paige T's comment, September 17, 2012 7:19 AM
This is very interesting because I had no idea that the United States had gone under such transformation. Even within certain borders, there is much change in respect to who the area belongs to. You definitely have to watch it a few times to get the full affect though.
Lindsey Robinson's comment, September 17, 2012 7:21 AM
Although the moving image makes it hard to actually pinpoint the U.S expansion at specific dates, I don't think that is the point of the map. The point of the map is to show how many times territories have changed, etc. I really like the map.. I have never seen anything like it.
Jesse Gauthier's comment, September 17, 2012 7:42 AM
The United States has changed drastically through the years with state borders, but I noticed that the regions' labels of the country are still similar today. For example, the southwest is much more divided today but still classified as a region with plenty of Spanish culture.
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Shanghai: 1990 vs. 2010

Shanghai: 1990 vs. 2010 | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

Globalization has hit...hard and fast. 


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Maegan Connor's curator insight, December 17, 2013 8:02 PM

Shanghai could arguably be the best example of globalization in the world today. In the span of 20 years, it has gone from a sparse city with some commerce on the river to a major urban center with the skyscrapers and neon lights. The transformation between the two images is staggering and it's easy to see the resemblance between current day Shanghai and it's partner globalized cities like New York and Seoul.

Cam E's curator insight, April 8, 8:23 AM

Apart from what can be said about the process of Globalization, this is just impressive under the lens of what can be done in 20 years to change the skylines and landscapes of an area. Notice the lack of vegetation in the second picture, and while it may just be an effect of the different time of day or season, they sky seems a lot more fogged in the second picture, possibly due to pollution.

Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, April 14, 3:35 PM

Shanghai has transformed and globalized so quickly in the last twenty years that it doesn't even look like that same place. Skies that were once seen are now blocked by skyscrapers. Buildings that still remain are overpowered and do not stand out like they once did.

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Countries with the Most Migrants

Countries with the Most Migrants | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

List of the countries with the most migrants in the world as measured by net migration rate.


Which countries have the most migrants per capita living there?  What spatial or development patterns do you see on this list?  


Tags: Migration, population, Immigration, statistics, worldwide, unit 2 population. 


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Lauren Sellers's curator insight, May 22, 9:04 AM

This is an interesting little chart because it reveals to us which countries have the highest percentage of migrants that make up their general population. Definitely suprised me to see Qatar as the number one on the list, I would have expected the US to be at the top, but it is not even in the top 10!

Lona Pradeep Parad's curator insight, May 28, 4:26 PM

This shows the net migration of immigrants. 

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Thomas Malthus and Population Growth

Learn more: http://www.khanacademy.org/video?v=r1ywppAJ1xs Thomas Malthus's views on population. Malthusian limits.

 

This is a succinct (but not perfect) summary of Malthusian ideas on population.  What do you think of his ideas?  Any specific parts of his theory that you agree with?  Do you disagree with some of his ideas?  What did history have to say about it?  

 

Tags: Demographics, population, models, APHG,  unit 2 population. 


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Lauren Jacquez's curator insight, October 25, 2013 8:01 PM

We will be learning about Malthus in Chapter 2.  Take a sneek peek!

Lauren Sellers's curator insight, May 20, 8:57 AM

The Malthusian ideas maintain that food growth is only linear, while population growth is geometric, so soon population will outgrow food production and famines will occur,

Lona Pradeep Parad's curator insight, May 28, 4:12 PM

This video very well explains the malthusian theory and how it is associated with population

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The Global Food Waste Scandal

TED Talks Western countries throw out nearly half of their food, not because it’s inedible -- but because it doesn’t look appealing. Tristram Stuart delves into the shocking data of wasted food, calling for a more responsible use of global resources.

 

No one should be surprised that more developed societies are more wasteful societies.  It is not just personal wasting of food at the house and restaurants that are the problem.  Perfectly edible food is thrown out due to size (smaller than standards but perfectly normal), cosmetics (Bananas that are shaped 'funny') and costumer preference (discarded bread crust).  This is an intriguing perpective on our consumptive culture, but it also is helpful in framing issues such as sustainability and human and environmental interactions in a technologically advanced societies that are often removed form the land where the food they eat originates. 

 

Tags: food, agriculture, consumption, sustainability, TED, video, unit 5 agriculture.


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Shelby Porter's curator insight, November 4, 2013 7:39 AM

It isn't surprising that the more a country has developed, the more wasteful they are. I just think that we need to change this standard. We can not keep this up if we want to sustain ourselves for centuries to come. If we are going to change our consumption culture, we need to look at why it has become the way it is. Why do we see food as unappealing? This is an interesting video and certaintly makes you think twice about throwing anything away. 

Kenny Dominguez's curator insight, November 29, 2013 3:13 PM

Ted explains it well how we all waste perfectly good food that people would like to eat. Also it was amazing how much food was in the dumpsters that was just a day or week old. That meat could feed hundreds of people that are struggling to eat and all that meet to waste. 

megan b clement's curator insight, December 15, 2013 10:51 PM

Ted talks about just how wasteful our planet is. How we just ignore the issue and act like it will  not affect us in the future. When he shows you video and pictures of massive piles of the ends of a loaf of bread or all the food that Stop and Shop throws out because it does not "look" good for the customer. How every little bit of help counts you can try to make a little bit of an effort to be less wasteful. We have so much unnecessary waste. Like when he uses the example of how many people throw away the ends of a loaf of bread then he shows the waste of the ends of bread in massive piles it makes you sick. Especially with all of the hungry people in the world we need to be more resourceful.

 

 

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80% of Americans Live Within 20 Miles of a Starbucks

80% of Americans Live Within 20 Miles of a Starbucks | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

The green dots on this map representing Starbucks locations which are obviously clustered in major metropolitan centers.  Cross-referencing this Starbucks address location with population data, Davenport explains his mapping technique: "By counting the number of people who live within a given distance to each Starbucks, we can measure how well centered Frappuccinos are to the US citizenry. In other words: draw a 1-mile circle around every store, then add up the % of the population living within the circles. Repeat for 2, 3, 4....100 miles."   The result of this data is a fabulous logrithmic S-curve which explains much about the American population distribution.   

 

Tags: statistics, density, consumption, mapping, visualization, urban.


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Rich's comment, October 10, 2012 10:26 AM
That is insane how large that corperation is.
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Day vs. Night population maps

Day vs. Night population maps | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

A great image for showing the pulsating rythmns of a dynamic urban system.  We treat population density as a static metric, but how many people are in a given place would truly be difficult to fully quantify.  What logisitic difficulties would this shift present for cities?  


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Wildcardspades58's comment, December 16, 2011 8:44 AM
I would be interested to find out how these were created and how the data was recorded.
Darius Kidd's comment, August 27, 2013 7:44 AM
There is not much Definiton on this map......
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Distance To McDonald’s

Distance To McDonald’s | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

This map answers a few simple questions:  How far away is the nearest McDonald's?  Where is the concentration of McDonald's highest or lowest?  While population density is the immediate pattern that we identify, what else can this map show us?   


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Kalin B.'s comment, November 5, 2012 8:27 AM
Diffusion and globalization are truly forces to be reckoned with.
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Beautiful Data Visualizations from the 19th Century

Beautiful Data Visualizations from the 19th Century | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

Do you want some inspiration to create a visually stunning - yet fully optimized - data graphic? Well, let's go back about a 140 years... Handsome Atlas developed by Jonathan Soma of Brooklyn Brainery, provides a stunning new online interface to a large collection of beautiful data visualizations from the 19th century.

 

TR: Taking into account the age of these visualizations, one has to wonder if they intended them to be used by our generation in this way. I see potential for a "web 2.0" update of these charts to make them interactive . . .

 

Tags: infographic, historical, visualization, statistics.


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Visualizing Regional Population Statistics

It was just over two centuries ago that the global population was 1 billion — in 1804. But better medicine and improved agriculture resulted in higher life expectancy for children, dramatically increasing the world population, especially in the West.

 

This is an excellent video for population and demographic units, but also for showing regional and spatial patterns within the global dataset (since terms like 'overpopulation' and 'carrying capacity' inherently have different meanings in distinct place and when analyzed at various scales). It is also a fantastic way to visualize population data and explain the ideas that are foundational for the Demographic Transition Model.

 

Tags: population, scale, visualization, Demographics, models, unit 2 population, sustainability, regions, spatial.


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olivia estrugo's curator insight, November 12, 2013 11:01 AM

Interesting video.

Alison Antonelli's curator insight, December 4, 2013 6:37 AM

After watching this short clip, it puts the popluation into perspective. I never knew how quickly the populaiton could grow and this video is a pure example of how it does. Over population is going to be a major problem in the future.

Denise Pacheco's curator insight, December 17, 2013 8:07 AM

Watching this video made me think how or if it's possible to have that many people on earth and still have enough food, jobs, and shelter for everyone. The carrying capacity seems way too densed. It is possible to fit a high number of people in one area year by year as long as we know how to use the space thats given to us. I dont think many countries have come up with an good logic or plans on how to sustain the overpopulated areas throught the globe. If they did, then there would be enough food, shelter, and jobs. There wouldn't be so many people unemployed, malnourished, and homeless if the government would come up with a plan.

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Remote Sensing and Land Cover Change

Remote Sensing and Land Cover Change | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

By moving the slider, the user can compare 1990 false-color Landsat views (left) with recent true-color imagery (right). Humans are increasingly transforming Earth’s surface—through direct activities such as farming, mining, and building, and indirectly by altering its climate.


This interactive feature includes 12 places that have experienced significant change since 1990.  This is an user-friendly way to compare remote sensing images over time.  Pictured above is the Aral Sea, which is and under-the-radar environmental catastrophe in Central Asia that has its roots in the Soviet era's (mis)management policies.  

 

Tags: remote sensing, land use, environment, geospatial, environment modify, esri, unit 1 Geoprinciples, zbestofzbest.


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Luke Walker's curator insight, October 23, 2013 8:14 PM

See how much the Aral Sea has changed due to the impact of humans on their environment for yourself. Drag the slider tool to see a before and after. Reference your textbook (p61) for the whole story.

Amy Marques's curator insight, April 24, 9:46 AM

This map is a true testament to the people who believe human activity does not affect the earth. Humans have been transforming Earth’s surface for years, through direct activities such as farming, mining, and building, and indirectly by altering its climate. Much of the transformation taking place in the Aral sea leads to its connection to the Soviet era and their lack of understanding of the environment. This mismanagement of the Aral Sea is leading to a lack of water for the people who live in Central Asia.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 7:30 AM

The colors seen in photographs and images like this is because of the equipment used. Sometimes the quality of the equipment makes the pictures look different than they actually are. This basin has dried up over time and its surface has signs of significant change.

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The True Size Of Africa

The True Size Of Africa | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

This is another old classic image that I might have shared earlier but it merits repeating. As Salvatore Natoli (a leader in geography education) once said, "In our society we unconsciously equate size with importance and even power." This is one reason why many people have underestimated the true size of Africa relative to places that they view as more important or more powerful.


Tags: mapping, Africa, perspective, images. 


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Ricardo Salaya Monsell's comment, November 5, 2012 10:31 AM
Although I do not think they do to "trick", it is true that confuses many people and makes them believe in a world disproportionate. (Apologies for my terrible google-English)
Laurence Cuffe's curator insight, August 1, 2013 1:46 AM

While size is not every thing, and Ireland seems to have returned to the UK, This is an image worth discusing in Class.

Afrikasources's curator insight, January 15, 7:10 AM

Just a reminder

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Disputed Isles

Disputed Isles | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

Competing territorial claims have led to maritime disputes off the coast of Asia. See a map of the islands at issue.

 

This is an nice interactive map that allows the reader to explore current geopolitical conflicts that are about controlling islands.  This is an good source to use when introducing Exclusive Economic Zones, which is often the key strategic importance of small, lightly populated islands.   

 

Tags: EastAsia, SouthEastAsia, political, unit 4 political, territoriality, autonomy, conflict, economic. 


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Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, April 16, 3:20 PM

This interactive map discusses the current disputes between the islands and why the land is being disputed. 

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, April 24, 11:40 AM

This interactive page gives relevant information about islands that are disputed over in southeast Asia.  I liked it because you could see the information in context with the map.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 6:47 PM

This is like a game of Monopoly when people try and get all the houses or businesses. Except this is real life and real isles. Whose is whose? How does Asia decide where and how the EEZ's should be divided.

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An Annotated Map of Today's Protests and of the 'Muslim World'

An Annotated Map of Today's Protests and of the 'Muslim World' | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
The violent backlash against the American film is taking place in Muslim societies, but it doesn't seem to correlate with Islam's reach.

 

This is a good reminder that the generalizing about "all Muslims" is as inaccurate as generalization about "all Christians" or any other group.  The world and people are much more nuanced than that. 

 

Tags: MiddleEast, Islam, conflict.


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Martin Daumiller's comment, September 15, 2012 11:53 PM
The map is slightly poor. 100% and more world muslim population? There is a great mix-up between muslims living in a country and percentage of muslims living in a country, therefore turning the U.S., Russia, etc. also into the discussion.
Also there is a distinction between not-protesting and not supporting the protests, which should influence the authers comparision of different mentalities.
The main idea against stereotypes and generalization is a very worthy one, but the way is article shows it is flawed.