FCHS AP HUMAN GEO...
Follow
Find
7.9K views | +0 today
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by FCHSAPGEO from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

SimCity EDU

SimCity EDU | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
SimCityEDU - Create & Share SimCity Learning Tools

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Jamie Strickland's comment, March 11, 2013 2:36 PM
I played the original when it first came out--it was a lot of fun to watch the city grow and change. I had a colleague that used one of the more recent versions in his land use planning course. This will be interesting to poke around in.
Leslie G Perry's curator insight, March 11, 2013 9:20 PM

It's all about gaming to help them get connected. I heard a story from a colleague today. He said that every year at this school, an veteran would come and talk to the students about the military and World War II but students really didn't get it. So the next year, he had them all play Call of Duty right before the veteran visited the school. He had them storm the beaches of Normandy (on the hardest level). They all failed. The next time the veteran came to speak, they were animated and asking questions about how could they have managed such a feat. 

Seth Dixon's comment, March 12, 2013 4:43 PM
The game is getting more sophisticated: http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2013/02/26/simcity-is-smarter-than-you-even-if-you-re-an-urban-planner.html
Rescooped by FCHSAPGEO from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Human Development Index

"This video shows the basic concept of HDI (Human Development Index), by using four different examples (Japan, Mexico, India and Angola)."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Maggie Naude's curator insight, March 1, 2013 4:32 PM

some emerging markets, Japan

Ann-Laure Liéval's curator insight, March 6, 2013 2:38 PM

Des cartes pour comprendre le monde

Tracey Sarvis's curator insight, November 9, 2014 8:24 AM

HDI

Rescooped by FCHSAPGEO from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Flag Food

Flag Food | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon
more...
dilaycock's curator insight, February 4, 2013 10:02 PM

Now here's an interesting activity for students!

Mark Slusher's curator insight, February 9, 2013 8:46 AM

Now THIS is geographical food for thought! Talk about conquering a nation!

Emily Larsson's comment, September 10, 2013 8:15 PM
I love that! It's so creative. Whoever came up with the idea to do this as an advertisement for the international food festival did a great job. They all look so delicious. Food festivals are a great way to experience other cultures.
Scooped by FCHSAPGEO
Scoop.it!

In North Korea, learning to hate U.S. starts with children

In North Korea, learning to hate U.S. starts with children | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
For North Korean children, learning to hate Americans is as much a part of the curriculum as learning to count.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by FCHSAPGEO
Scoop.it!

Why 3D Modeling Will Play a Huge Role in Tackling Rapid Urbanization

Why 3D Modeling Will Play a Huge Role in Tackling Rapid Urbanization | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
We can now simulate the effects of earthquakes, traffic jams and population expansion. From every angle.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by FCHSAPGEO from AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO
Scoop.it!

595 - It’s Always Chile in Norway: the Five Types of Territorial Morphology | Strange Maps | Big Think

595 - It’s Always Chile in Norway: the Five Types of Territorial Morphology | Strange Maps | Big Think | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
Do Norwegians feel curiously at home in Chile, and vice versa? Do South Africans have a strange affinity with Italians? And Filipinos with Maldivians?

Via Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by FCHSAPGEO from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

World Cities Quiz

World Cities Quiz | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
Try out some geography trivia in our World Cities Quiz: a great geography quiz that tests your knowledge of some of the major cities of the word!

Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by FCHSAPGEO from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Megacities Reflect Growing Urbanization Trend

Read the Transcript: http://to.pbs.org/b6sR86 The capital of the South Asian country Bangladesh, Dhaka, has a population that is booming. However, it stands ...

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 1, 2014 2:44 PM

It is very sad that people have to move to a polluted, crowded mess of a place in order to get a better life. The man says at the end that if they can make it work in Dhaka, they could make it work in any city but the beginning is too monumental to get over. I think that maybe some government control over the outer limits of the city and offering a place nearby with some resources may allow more control over the growth of the city at least temporarily.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 8:50 PM

To be a megacity like this, you have to conform to urbanization. There is no possible way to have such a populated and crowed city with farmlands around. This is a place of business yet residential areas, it also is where the marketplaces are and where kids go to school. Megacities need to be a part of an urban society in order for them to stay afloat.

Bec Seeto's curator insight, October 30, 2014 6:07 PM

This is a great introduction to the demographic explosion of the slums within megacities.  This is applicable to many themes within geography.   

Rescooped by FCHSAPGEO from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Humour in the steppes of Mongolia

Humour in the steppes of Mongolia | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
I can´t stop smiling from a photo I stumbled upon on the facebook page of Nomaden (a Norwegian travel store) – I just love it! I tried to find the source of the photo, but no luck. I found it sprea...

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 18, 2013 12:39 PM

I think this is my new litmus test for potential friends.  If this picture from Mongolia doesn't bring a smile to your face, I just don't think that we can be friends.  If anyone can find the original source (or a hi-res version), I'd love to hear about it.  

chris tobin's comment, February 21, 2013 1:33 PM
Great happy photo. This is a possible National Geographgic photo
Rescooped by FCHSAPGEO from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Enclaves

Enclaves | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
A website that examines the geographical enclaves of the world

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Alejandro Restrepo's comment, February 13, 2013 6:18 PM
Very interesting!
Ann-Laure Liéval's curator insight, February 14, 2013 7:32 AM
Mondialisation et frontières... et sur cette carte mon imminente destination de vacances: l'enclave omanaise de Musandam.
Lauren Jacquez's curator insight, February 14, 2013 4:46 PM

Enclaves of the world HUGGERS....review!

Scooped by FCHSAPGEO
Scoop.it!

Landmark shift: Majority of Chinese now live in cities

Landmark shift: Majority of Chinese now live in cities | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
More people in China are living in cities than in the countryside for the first time in the nation's history, a government agency said Tuesday.
more...
Lyn Leech's comment, August 23, 2013 8:41 PM
The progression of a lot of rural Chinese population is flocking to cities is largely due to the fact that the jobs in cities tend do be higher paying than jobs in agricultural and other similar fields. It's also quite common for a young person to go to a large city, live in a teensy apartment whist maintaining a job and send money back to their various loved ones.
Scooped by FCHSAPGEO
Scoop.it!

Love Data: Valentine's Day around the world, mapped

Love Data: Valentine's Day around the world, mapped | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
Today, most of us celebrate love in one way or another – but how many different ways do you know? The Datablog found out
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by FCHSAPGEO from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

New in Town, Stranger?

New in Town, Stranger? | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 4, 2013 11:12 AM

For computers, shibboleths allow online verification of your identity.  Culturally, shibboleths are words that have distinct regional pronouncations and consequently 'reveal' something of the speakers ethnic, cultural or regional background.  This Washington Post article lists some phrases that people that are visiting Washington D.C., or not from there often get wrong. 


Tags: language, culture, Washington DC, unit 3 culture.

Rescooped by FCHSAPGEO from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

South Sudan: The World’s Newest Country

South Sudan: The World’s Newest Country | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, March 17, 2014 5:08 PM

South Sudan recently gained its independence from Sudan. South Sudan is now home to 10-12 million people and is the 193rd member of the United Nations. However, just because South Sudan became independent from Sudan does not mean it does not no longer carry some of the remaining issues.

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, March 25, 2014 1:26 PM

This infographic gives an idea of why South Sudan seceded from the rest of the country. Decades of civil war preceded the secession, and it is clear the cultural differences between the two areas were a contributing factor. South Sudan is a part of the fertile Sahel, with the majority of its people Christian, while Sudan is mostly desert, with the majority of its people Muslims. South Sudan, as a new nation, faces a number of difficulties. Its new government needed to remain stable to focus on nation building, but war has broken out between the government and a rebel faction. South Sudan, should it become stable again, should work to improve the education of its people, as the infographic explains, since the vote to secede needed symbols rather than words due to only 15% of its people being literate.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 4:05 PM

South Sudan has separated itself two years ago from the rest of Sudan. Its powers have become acknowledged by other countries and its messages to the outside world are ones of peace.

Scooped by FCHSAPGEO
Scoop.it!

Ken Jennings on the Real Reason You Can't Dig a Hole All the Way to China

Ken Jennings on the Real Reason You Can't Dig a Hole All the Way to China | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
The real reason you can't dig a hole all the way from the U.S. to China: They're not antipodes, explains Jeopardy! champ Ken Jennings.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by FCHSAPGEO
Scoop.it!

Slow Food and Agritourism in the Pacific Northwest

Slow Food and Agritourism in the Pacific Northwest | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
Agritourism is blossoming in the United States, especially in the farms and vineyards of the Pacific Northwest.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by FCHSAPGEO from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Hail Columbia!

Hail Columbia! | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
The federal government's relentless expansion has made Washington, D.C., America's real Second City.


From 1890-1990, Chicago was America's second largest city.  Since then Los Angeles has been the second largest city, acting as the west coast capital for the United States. Both of these cities have declined in economic and political importance in the recession, and in this article Aaron Renn argues that Washington D.C. (although demographically not in the same category) could be considered an emerging second city and chronicles it's historic development.  Readers may also be interested in how Renn ("the urbanophile") argues that all our impressions about Detroit are inaccurate. 


Tags: Washington DC, urban, historical, unit 7 cities.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by FCHSAPGEO from AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO
Scoop.it!

Springsteen in the USA: 40 Years of Touring as a Study in Spatial Diffusion

Springsteen in the USA: 40 Years of Touring as a Study in Spatial Diffusion | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

Daniel Trone mapped Bruce Springsteen's 1500+ shows over 40 years, and Brian Timoney explains this "as a study in spatial diffusion--how phenomena such as innovation, fashion, or disease spread geographically." Trone maps not only the location of shows, but the "heat" they generate, which he calculates, according to Timoney, "as a function of the location of the show, the size of the venue, and inversely correlated with the overall population within 40km of the concert location" Springsteen's career seen this way is a story about growing a name in rock in a pre-internet era of word-of-mouth discussion of great bands and concerts. One of Timoney's arguments is that because Springsteen, when he was getting started, would play multiple shows in the same city over a number of nights, that made it possible for word of the music to spread from night to night and for new audiences to catch a show after hearing about Springsteen from a friend who had attended the night before. The argument here is also about how music spreads across the country and what prompts that kind of spread. For some brief commentary/thoughts on Trone's map and Timoney's arguments, see Josh Jones at Open Culture (http://bit.ly/S9SWPK), David Haglund at Slate (http://slate.me/SMpbEw), and Sarah Kliff on the Washington Post Wonkblog (http://wapo.st/R2tPtR). An interactive version of Trone's map is available here: http://maputopia.com/springsteen/. And the story behind the making of the map from Daniel Trone is available here: http://bit.ly/Ph9Jdr. ;


Via Nathan Phillips, Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by FCHSAPGEO from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Flag wars

Flag wars | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

"Mr Füzes had voiced support for the Székler people, a group of ethnic Hungarians who live in Transylvania, after two Romanian counties banned the display of the Székler flag (pictured above with men in hussar uniform) on public buildings. Zsolt Nemeth, Hungary’s state secretary for foreign affairs, described the ban as an act of “symbolic aggression” and called for local councils in Hungary to show solidarity by flying the Székler flag from town halls. The Hungarian government then raised the Székler flag above Parliament, further enraging Bucharest..."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Conor McCloskey's comment, April 30, 2013 10:26 AM
The past is the past. Or is it? The past seems to mean more to the people of Hungary and Romania these days. The Treaty of Trianon of 1920 sectioned the region of Transylvania from Romania to Hungary. For the ethnic Hungarians living in Transylvania, this posed quite the issue. For many people around the world, the homeland does not always match up with geopolitical boundaries of the country that they live in. While this identity crisis causes conflict for many groups of people all over the world, in Hungary the fight to regain greater-Hungary continues today.
This article also poses interesting questions of voting and citizenship. The Hungarian government granted citizenship beyond its borders, and jurisdiction, to ethnic Hungarians in Romania. What does this say about those Hungarians in Romania? Does it bring Hungary any closer to regaining the borders of the once Greater Hungary? Regardless of the questions of citizenship, such public and federal efforts to expand their borders and regain their ethnic population and homeland is doing more then turning heads. Look to this region for future conflict because the failure of geopolitical nations to represent ethnic homelands rarely ends peacefully.
John Peterson's comment, April 30, 2013 10:37 AM
This article helps to illustrate tensions that can be caused by seemingly simple acts within a society that is home to two conflicting groups. While flags do not have any actual influence or power in society, they are a source of emotion, and pride in ones nation and heritage. Because of the emotion that is tied with flags, it can be a very tense situation when the use of these flags is banned, or if these flags are taken down or destroyed. It is amazing how something so simple as a flag can bring about so much anger, and be the source of such bad blood and violence between different nations or ethnic groups. In the example given, there has been conflict for years, which was recently fueled even more over the use of a flag. While the act of displaying a flag is simply a display of loyalty, the actions of the Romanian government against this practice shows how although it is not a violent act, it can lead to very hostile actions and interactions.
Zakary Pereira's comment, April 30, 2013 4:12 PM
This article got me thinking. The tensions between Hungary and Romania seem trivial to me. The Romanians are the right ones in my opinion and the act of displaying the Székler flag about the Hungarian Parliament was plainly a theoretical middle finger to Romania. The more than a million Hungarians living in present day Romania relates to our unit on culture and nations/states. There is a Hungarian nation of people in Romania that the Hungarian government has now granted rights to, again purposely antagonizing Romania, and Romania is rightfully concerned of their dual-loyalty. Overall, the situation is taken way out of proportion by Hungary and what former piece of an empire wants that flag flown in their country. In Ireland do you see the Union Jack… that’d be a no.
Rescooped by FCHSAPGEO from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Megacities Reflect Growing Urbanization Trend

Read the Transcript: http://to.pbs.org/b6sR86 The capital of the South Asian country Bangladesh, Dhaka, has a population that is booming. However, it stands ...

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 1, 2014 2:44 PM

It is very sad that people have to move to a polluted, crowded mess of a place in order to get a better life. The man says at the end that if they can make it work in Dhaka, they could make it work in any city but the beginning is too monumental to get over. I think that maybe some government control over the outer limits of the city and offering a place nearby with some resources may allow more control over the growth of the city at least temporarily.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 8:50 PM

To be a megacity like this, you have to conform to urbanization. There is no possible way to have such a populated and crowed city with farmlands around. This is a place of business yet residential areas, it also is where the marketplaces are and where kids go to school. Megacities need to be a part of an urban society in order for them to stay afloat.

Bec Seeto's curator insight, October 30, 2014 6:07 PM

This is a great introduction to the demographic explosion of the slums within megacities.  This is applicable to many themes within geography.   

Rescooped by FCHSAPGEO from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Humour in the steppes of Mongolia

Humour in the steppes of Mongolia | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
I can´t stop smiling from a photo I stumbled upon on the facebook page of Nomaden (a Norwegian travel store) – I just love it! I tried to find the source of the photo, but no luck. I found it sprea...

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 18, 2013 12:39 PM

I think this is my new litmus test for potential friends.  If this picture from Mongolia doesn't bring a smile to your face, I just don't think that we can be friends.  If anyone can find the original source (or a hi-res version), I'd love to hear about it.  

chris tobin's comment, February 21, 2013 1:33 PM
Great happy photo. This is a possible National Geographgic photo
Rescooped by FCHSAPGEO from Geography in the classroom
Scoop.it!

Rise of the megacities – get the data

Rise of the megacities – get the data | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
Out-of-date censuses, inconsistent methodologies and the political manipulation of official statistics mean estimating and predicting city populations is fraught with difficulty

Via dilaycock
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by FCHSAPGEO
Scoop.it!

Top 10 Trends For 2012 — The Pop-Up City

Top 10 Trends For 2012 — The Pop-Up City | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
First of all we wish you all a happy, inspiring and healthy 2012! In January last year we published a series of ten trends for 2011 when it comes to urbanism,
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by FCHSAPGEO
Scoop.it!

The 10 Emptiest US Cities 2012

The 10 Emptiest US Cities 2012 | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
From falling home values and impaired labor mobility to backed-up inventories and a flood of foreclosures, the real-estate downturn affects the economy at large in countless ways.
more...
No comment yet.