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White Christmas?

White Christmas? | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
Probability of a white Christmas in U.S.

 

This is not a weather report; we are still too far out to start predicting that with any accuracy.  What this map does show is the statistical probabilities of snow cover thoughout the United States for December 25th based on past climatological data.    


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Why Geography Education Matters

Why Geography Education Matters | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

"This blog-a-thon submission comes from Joseph Kerski of the National Council of Geographic Education (2011 President). Joseph writes about why geography education matters and how it applies to each one of us."

 

 

This was one great orange! Thank you GS!

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austin tydings's comment, August 27, 2013 2:41 PM
Geography, is a subject where it takes all the skills from science, math, English, and social studies, and combines it into a in depth thinking class. It makes you find the problem, fix it and tell how and why you fixed it . For example, a crop is not growing in a dry area, then you try it in a wet area and it grows, now you have to find out why it grows in a wet area and not a dry area and explain why. It is good to start out early learning about the basics in the core classes then later in the more advance classes, to understand how to fix a problem.
Annenkov's curator insight, September 13, 2013 2:09 AM

"Geography education applies to each one of us" - not only for children, but for adults in everyday life. Who is interested in developing a personal geoculture?  

Peter Phillips's curator insight, October 5, 2013 7:37 PM

Using an orange to learn the continents of the Earth :) great idea. 

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Pumpkin Geography

Pumpkin Geography | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

"During the month of October, I take advantage of the pumpkin harvest to bring hands-on geography to my students.  After spending a month becoming familiar with the location of the seven continents and the major bodies of water, each student is given a pumpkin to turn into a globe. Students paint the entire surface of the pumpkin blue to represent water. Next, they use pushpins to position and trace the outline of each continent onto their pumpkins. They use actual globes as models and are careful to place the continents in the correct hemisphere. Then, they paint and label each continent a different color. They label the major bodies of water and use white paint to represent the North and South Poles."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 22, 8:57 AM

Happy October everyone!  The pictures above (from a friend's website) show how teachers and parents alike can get children involved in a fun craft that will strengthen kids' mental maps--all with a seasonal twist.  If you really love idea of pumpkin globes, you should also see this one.   


Tagsart, K12, fun, seasonal.

Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 23, 9:17 AM

Happy October everyone!  The pictures above (from a friend's website) show how teachers and parents alike can get children involved in a fun craft that will strengthen kids' mental maps--all with a seasonal twist.  If you really love idea of pumpkin globes, you should also see this one.   


Tagsart, K12, fun, seasonal.

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World Food Day: 10 myths about hunger

World Food Day: 10 myths about hunger | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
How much do you know about global hunger? Carla Kweifio-Okai take a look at some of the biggest food production and nutrition myths

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dilaycock's curator insight, October 16, 5:34 PM

Play the interactive food game.

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Feeding Our Hungry Planet

"By 2050, the world's population will likely increase 35 percent. But is growing more food the only option—or even the best? National Geographic investigates the challenges and solutions to feeding everyone on our planet, based on an eight-month series in National Geographic magazine.  Visit http://natgeofood.com for ongoing coverage of food issues as we investigate the Future of Food today on World Food Day."

 

Tags: sustainability, agriculture, food production, unit 5 agriculture.


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Truthbehere2's curator insight, October 17, 10:30 AM

I think I might as well buy some land and plant my own huge garden for this crap coming up and have a fence around my yard too

Nancy Watson's curator insight, October 19, 8:53 AM

Population increase is just part of the story. How do we feed everyone? How will we provide for the needs of everyone?  Can the earth sustain the use of her resources and the impact of our growing needs and output. First we must eat. Can we learn to do that wisely? 

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How Many Flyover States Does It Take to Equal One New York City?

How Many Flyover States Does It Take to Equal One New York City? | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

"Don’t let my New York City–centric comparisons hinder your imagination. The interactive at the top of this page lets you visualize how different parts of the country compare in population density.

Click the button at the bottom of the interactive to select Los Angeles County, for instance, and then click anywhere on the map to generate a (roughly) circular region of (roughly) equal population. The population data come from the 2010 census, and the square mileage was calculated by summing each highlighted county’s total area. You can also use New Jersey (the most densely populated state), Wyoming (the least densely populated state outside of Alaska), Texas, the coasts (the group of all counties that come within 35 miles of either the Atlantic or Pacific oceans), and, yes, New York City as the baseline for your population comparison."

 

Tags: cartography, mapping, visualization, urban, density.


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Andrew Stoops's curator insight, October 13, 10:16 PM

This map is interesting in that flyover states is something that is not easily defined, at least by me. You could argue that no state is a flyover state because of the industry and businesses within the state itself. I am also curious to know why so few folks live in these areas as I have been to most of these places and they have the social and environmental pull factors important to migration.

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Welcome to the Anthropocene

"A 3-minute journey through the last 250 years of our history, from the start of the Industrial Revolution to the Rio+20 Summit. The film charts the growth of humanity into a global force on the equivalent scale to major geological processes."


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Diane Johnson's curator insight, September 22, 9:28 AM

More climate considerations

Olga Boldina's curator insight, September 24, 10:39 AM

добавить свой понимание ...

Javier Antonio Bellina's curator insight, September 24, 11:55 AM

El Antropoceno,  nueva era geológica

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GeoGuessr - Let's explore the world!

GeoGuessr is a geography game which takes you on a journey around the world and challenges your ability to recognize your surroundings.
FCHSAPGEO's insight:

This is a great way for students to explore their "sense of place."

I love this game!

 

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How technology is changing the future of wine-making

How technology is changing the future of wine-making | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

"In California the huge E&J Gallo and Mondavi wineries use Nasa technology. From satellites and small planes, pictures are taken using various spectra, such as infrared, which reveal exact conditions on the ground."


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The oceans are full of our plastic – here's what we can do about it

The oceans are full of our plastic – here's what we can do about it | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
By 2050, 95% of seabirds will have plastic in their gut. That is just one finding from our national marine debris research project, the largest sample of marine debris data ever collected anywhere in the…

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18 "Geography Fail" Media Gaffes

18 "Geography Fail" Media Gaffes | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
Maps are hard. Not that hard, though.

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Jamie Strickland's curator insight, September 9, 2:28 PM

Yet another resource to add to my "this is why we take map quizzes" lecture at the beginning of the semester!!

Nancy Watson's curator insight, September 14, 11:33 AM

Unit 1 Geography Nature and Perspective. These people need perspective and a Geography course or two.

Scott Langston's curator insight, September 18, 8:05 PM

I like the 'not that hard, though' tag.

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Where China and Kazakhstan Meet

Where China and Kazakhstan Meet | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

e "While people often say that borders aren’t visible from space, the line between Kazakhstan and China could not be more clear in this satellite image. Acquired by the Landsat 8 satellite on September 9, 2013, the image shows northwestern China around the city of Qoqek and far eastern Kazakhstan near Lake Balqash.

The border between the two countries is defined by land-use policies. In China, land use is intense. Only 11.62 percent of China’s land is arable. Pressed by a need to produce food for 1.3 billion people, China farms just about any land that can be sustained for agriculture. Fields are dark green in contrast to the surrounding arid landscape, a sign that the agriculture is irrigated. As of 2006, about 65 percent of China’s fresh water was used for agriculture, irrigating 629,000 square kilometers (243,000 square miles) of farmland, an area slightly smaller than the state of Texas.

The story is quite different in Kazakhstan. Here, large industrial-sized farms dominate, an artifact of Soviet-era agriculture. While agriculture is an important sector in the Kazakh economy, eastern Kazakhstan is a minor growing area. Only 0.03 percent of Kazakhstan’s land is devoted to permanent agriculture, with 20,660 square kilometers being irrigated. The land along the Chinese border is minimally used, though rectangular shapes show that farming does occur in the region. Much of the agriculture in this region is rain-fed, so the fields are tan much like the surrounding natural landscape."

 

Tags: remote sensing, land use, environment, geospatial, environment modify, food, agriculture, agricultural land change.


Via Seth Dixon
FCHSAPGEO's insight:

We discussed Landsat images today and borders. Here is a current article to bring it all together.

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MsPerry's curator insight, September 6, 4:34 PM

APHG U4

Ruth Reynolds's curator insight, September 18, 5:26 AM

what a difference a govt makes!

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How to Follow the Iceland and Papua New Guinea Volcano Eruptions

How to Follow the Iceland and Papua New Guinea Volcano Eruptions | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
Webcams, Twitter, and data visualizations show you what's going on with Bárðarbunga and Mount Tavurvur.

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Why everyone should be able to read a map

Why everyone should be able to read a map | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
New research suggests that map reading is a dying skill in the age of the smartphone. Perish the thought, says Rob Cowen

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CT Blake's curator insight, September 2, 4:21 PM

Especially Connor McCloud.

Lindley Amarantos's curator insight, September 5, 9:17 AM

this can explain why it is important to NOT always rely on technology. It is good to keep your brain active and the spatial awareness that comes with reading a map is invaluable

Dolors Cantacorps's curator insight, September 5, 3:13 PM

Practiquem-ho a classe doncs!

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Obama admin. to allow thousands of Haitians into U.S. without visas: ‘Which countries are next?’

Obama admin. to allow thousands of Haitians into U.S. without visas: ‘Which countries are next?’ | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
The ranking Republican on the Senate Judiciary Committee took the Obama administration to task Friday for its “irresponsible” plan to allow as many as 100,000 Haitians to immigrate to the U.S. without a visa.
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Population Density

This talks about what population density is and why people live where they do.-- Created using PowToon -- Free sign up at http://www.powtoon.com/ . Make your...

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Jeremy Hansen's curator insight, October 21, 10:46 AM

Excellent short video defining and explaining population density. 

Catherine Pearce's curator insight, October 23, 6:35 PM

A nice straight forward presentation

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Feeding the Whole World

"Louise Fresco argues that a smart approach to large-scale, industrial farming and food production will feed our planet's incoming population of nine billion. Only foods like (the scorned) supermarket white bread, she says, will nourish on a global scale."


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AckerbauHalle's curator insight, October 19, 7:18 AM

Sehr interessanter Beitrag von Louise Fresco zur Problematik des Welthungers. 

Marianne Naughton's curator insight, October 19, 12:07 PM

Feed The World ...

dilaycock's curator insight, October 19, 6:45 PM

Fresco argues that we tend to see "home-made" agriculture as a thing of beauty, whereas the reality is that many small scale farmers struggle and live a subsistence lifestyle. The adoration of small-scale farming, notes Fresco, is a luxury to those who can afford it. Large-scale production has increased the availability and affordability of food. Food production should be given as high a priority as climate change and sustainability, and we should seriously consider ways in which land can be used as a multi-purpose space that includes agriculture.

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Let’s Talk About Geography and Ebola

Let’s Talk About Geography and Ebola | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
Why knowing where countries are in Africa matters for how the rest of the world thinks about Ebola.

 

Cultural and media norms that often refer to Africa as one entity rather than an 11.7 million-square-mile land mass comprised of 54 countries and over 1.1 billion people who speak over 2,000 different languages.  This cultural confusion means that, when a dangerous virus like Ebola breaks out, Americans who are used to referring to “Africa” as one entity may make mistakes in understanding just how big of a threat Ebola actually is, who might have been exposed to it, and what the likelihood of an individual contracting it might be.  This Ebola outbreak is wreaking havoc on African economies beyond the three most heavily affected by Ebola, and that damage is completely avoidable. The East and Southern African safari industry provides a good example. Bookings for safaris there — including for the famed Great Migration in Kenya and Tanzania — have plummeted due to the Ebola outbreak. These actions are based in fear, not reality.

 

Tags: Ebola, medical, diffusion, Africa, regions, perspective.


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Scott Holcomb's curator insight, October 15, 10:37 AM

Great current classroom discussion aide!

Wilmine Merlain's curator insight, October 16, 11:36 AM

With this week new Ebola outbreak on US soil, one might think that the entire African Continent is infected with the disease. In actuality, in order to understand the Ebola outbreak in some countries in West Africa, one must first understand the map of Africa and the diversity and square miles that make up the continent. While we are concerned about the virus entering our homeland, those in South Africa and bordering countries are equally concerned about the spread of this deadly disease in their land. Just because we are miles away from the heart of the outbreak, those living on the continent are equally afraid for their life as we are here.

Kaitlin Young's curator insight, October 23, 12:35 PM

Just a few days ago, another student in one of my classes referred to Africa as a country and not a continent. After my professor cringed and corrected the student, she explained how unfortunately, she has to make that correction more often than you would thing. Many people do not realize the size of Africa, and that some places in Africa are further from the illness than part of Europe. Media headlines such as “Ebola Crisis in Africa” can create mass hysteria and further create judgment and discrimination towards the continent. South Africa is different from Sierra Leone which is different from Madagascar which is different from Egypt. By grouping all of these places together under one ignorantly used continent name, people are less likely to understand where Ebola really is, and why it is there. The irony shown by the college in Texas denying entry to a Nigerian citizen just proves the kind of fear mongering and misunderstanding that the Americans wallow in due to lack of geographical knowledge and lack of concern towards anything other than their own home. 

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America is rapidly aging in a country built for the young

America is rapidly aging in a country built for the young | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

"Although we seldom think about them this way, most American communities as they exist today were built for the spry and mobile. We've constructed millions of multi-story, single-family homes where the master bedroom is on the second floor, where the lawn outside requires weekly upkeep, where the mailbox is a stroll away. We've designed neighborhoods where everyday errands require a driver's license. We've planned whole cities where, if you don't have a car, it's not particularly easy to walk anywhere — especially not if you move gingerly.

This reality has been a fine one for a younger country. Those multi-story, single-family homes with broad lawns were great for Baby Boomers when they had young families. And car-dependent suburbs have been fine for residents with the means and mobility to drive everywhere. But as the Baby Boomers whose preferences drove a lot of these trends continue to age, it's becoming increasingly clear that the housing and communities we've built won't work very well for the old."


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MsPerry's curator insight, September 21, 3:14 PM

APHG-U2

Wilmine Merlain's curator insight, September 22, 12:47 PM

This reality is detrimental to the future of our society because it focuses on the now rather than looking into long terms on how these changes will impact our world in the long run. Looking at the way our society is progressing, these changes are relevant in major metropolitan cities, where the job market is attractive to the young rather than those with over 30 years of experience. In our society, not many see retirement being in the center of the city. Creating a society that accommodates both the young and the old, along with the married and unmarried is pivotal to the progression of  our ever changing world. 

Alexandra Piggott's curator insight, October 18, 6:48 PM

This is also an issue in Australia where the overwhelming majority of people live in single story dwellings and are very car reliant.

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The world as it is: The influence of religion

The world as it is: The influence of religion | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

"Seldom has it been more important for Americans to form a realistic assessment of the world scene. But our current governing, college-­educated class suffers one glaring blind spot.

Modern American culture produces highly individualistic career and identity paths for upper- and middle-class males and females. Power couples abound, often sporting different last names. But deeply held religious identities and military loyalties are less common. Few educated Americans have any direct experience with large groups of men gathered in intense prayer or battle. Like other citizens of the globalized corporate/consumer culture, educated Americans are often widely traveled but not deeply rooted in obligation to a particular physical place, a faith or a kinship."


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MsPerry's curator insight, September 21, 3:12 PM

APHG-U3

Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, September 22, 11:57 AM

Religion and its influence

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, October 1, 11:19 PM

Unit 3

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16 Children & Their Bedrooms From Around the World…

16 Children & Their Bedrooms From Around the World… | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
What did your childhood bedroom look like? Chances are if you grew up in a westernized world, it had a solid bed, scattered toys, and wall decorations that creatively expressed the type of child you were, and hinted at the person you were to become. What you may have taken for granted, however, a large percent of others will never experience. There’s no right or wrong pertaining to living situations, but many unique lessons to be gained from acknowledging that the type of childhood one is given has an impressionable effect on their future.

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dilaycock's curator insight, September 15, 8:20 PM

What a great way to connect with students and discuss issues such as lifestyle, living standards, health etc.

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, September 18, 5:34 AM

Personal geographies - perspectives and worldviews

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Beach program aims to keep Boardwalk benches clear

Beach program aims to keep Boardwalk benches clear | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
Under a Virginia Beach pilot program, center armrests have been added to about 15 benches between 18th and 20th streets on the Boardwalk to keep people from sleeping on them.
FCHSAPGEO's insight:

Students- Remember the article about the spikes in Canada? It is no longer "NIMBY", her is an article that is in your backyard!

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Anatomy of a Smart City

Anatomy of a Smart City | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

The 19th century was a century of empires, 20th century was a century of nation states and the 21st century will be a century of cities...


This outstanding infographic (courtesy of postscapes.com) begins with some information about our current state of urbanization.


Did you know that 1.3 million people are moving to cities each week?! It then explains the need for smart cities and delves into what is required to establish these intelligent connected environments, how the smart city may take various forms in the developing worlds and what specific technologies are necessary to achieve such grand goals in practice.


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Christian Allié's comment, August 8, 2013 6:20 AM
"« Le 21ème siècle sera spirituel ou ne sera pas »
"The 21st century will be spiritual or will not"
http://lespoir.jimdo.com/2012/08/31/le-21%C3%A8me-si%C3%A8cle-sera-spirituel-ou-ne-sera-pas/
About cities too........may be !
Margarida Sá Costa's curator insight, August 8, 2013 11:27 AM

cities of the future....future new human political organizations?

Grd Lyon-millenaire3's comment, August 19, 2013 6:06 AM
It supposes an organization at the world level but which and with whom? Doubtless adds us in a transitional period. The best is yet to come.
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Stop Complaining About Gentrification Unless You Know What It Is

Stop Complaining About Gentrification Unless You Know What It Is | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

"In many cities, it's become popular to hate 'gentrifiers,' rich people who move in and drive up housing prices -- pushing everyone else out. But what's going on in these rapidly-changing urban spaces is a lot more complicated than that."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 28, 2:02 PM

Gentrification can be a very touchy subject.  What appears to be economic revitalization of a down-trodden neighborhood to one, can appear to be systematic removal of minorities to another.  This op-ed isn't a whole-hearted embrace of gentrification, but it might be seen as a critique of the gentrification critics.

  

Tags: neighborhood, gentrificationurban, place, culture, economic.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, September 8, 12:38 PM

unit 7

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Industrial sites of old can be the cities of the future

Industrial sites of old can be the cities of the future | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
The buildings from our recent industrial past can offer some exciting new places for the future, with a heritage character and sense of place. With some creative thinking and ambition, these sites can…

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Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, September 2, 6:35 PM

Option topics - marine and urban 

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Comparing the five major world religions

"It's perfectly human to grapple with questions, like 'Where do we come from?' and 'How do I live a life of meaning?' These existential questions are central to the five major world religions -- and that's not all that connects these faiths. John Bellaimey explains the intertwined histories and cultures of Hinduism, Judaism, Buddhism, Christianity and Islam."


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Mary Elizabeth's curator insight, August 31, 4:41 PM

perfect for Culture Unit

MsPerry's curator insight, September 1, 9:48 AM

APHG-Unit 3

Lindley Amarantos's curator insight, September 5, 9:13 AM

Great insight into our 5 major world religions.

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Topography of Religion

Topography of Religion | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

"The Pew survey sorts people into major groupings--Christians; other religions, including Jewish and Muslim; and 'unaffiliated,' which includes atheist, agnostic and 'nothing in particular.'  Roll your cursor over the map to see how faiths and traditions break down by state."


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Tom Franta's curator insight, August 25, 12:51 PM

Interactive map showing religion by state

MsPerry's curator insight, August 25, 3:27 PM

APHG-Unit 1

CT Blake's curator insight, August 29, 7:09 PM

Awesome interactive map showing the relative religious composition of states.