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Life in Chechnya

Life in Chechnya | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
Photojournalist Diana Markosian spent the last year and half covering Russia's volatile North Caucasus region.

 

These 33 photos are arranged to tell the cultural story of life in Chechnya, especially the life of young women coming of age in the aftermath of the war.  As the architecture of this mosque suggests, the influence of traditional Islamic values and Russian political authority have greatly shaped the lives of the Chechen people.


Via Seth Dixon, Kelly Reagan
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Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, February 18, 2014 3:24 PM

These pictures show many examples to how life in Chechnya for women is very different for women in the United States. We can see that these woman take part in similar day to day activities, but in very different ways. This is why their lives overall are much different than ours.

Shanelle Zaino's curator insight, October 15, 2014 10:49 PM

The images I was able to see were moving. The image that stands out most were the children in gym class. Young men were able to wear gym like clothing and the girls needed to be covered head to toe wearing dresses.Powerful.I was able to see only a few and the rest seemed to be lightened to the point where you could not see them anymore. The words also seemed to be blocked out. =(

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 8, 2014 12:28 PM

These photos show the culture of Chechnya. I found them very effective at mixing the environmental and cultural aspects of the area in these pictures. The one where two young people are on a date in a barren snow covered park sitting on opposites sides of the bench because close physical contact is forbidden before marriage. Although the school gym shows how women have to be dressed modestly even when they are exercising. 

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Why Geography Education Matters

Why Geography Education Matters | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

"This blog-a-thon submission comes from Joseph Kerski of the National Council of Geographic Education (2011 President). Joseph writes about why geography education matters and how it applies to each one of us."

 

 

This was one great orange! Thank you GS!

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austin tydings's comment, August 27, 2013 2:41 PM
Geography, is a subject where it takes all the skills from science, math, English, and social studies, and combines it into a in depth thinking class. It makes you find the problem, fix it and tell how and why you fixed it . For example, a crop is not growing in a dry area, then you try it in a wet area and it grows, now you have to find out why it grows in a wet area and not a dry area and explain why. It is good to start out early learning about the basics in the core classes then later in the more advance classes, to understand how to fix a problem.
Annenkov's curator insight, September 13, 2013 2:09 AM

"Geography education applies to each one of us" - not only for children, but for adults in everyday life. Who is interested in developing a personal geoculture?  

Peter Phillips's curator insight, October 5, 2013 7:37 PM

Using an orange to learn the continents of the Earth :) great idea. 

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A coast-to-coast picture of America's cacophony of sounds

A coast-to-coast picture of America's cacophony of sounds | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
The National Park Service mapped noise across the United States.
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The largest city in Brazil is running dangerously low on water

The largest city in Brazil is running dangerously low on water | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
Thanks to the worst drought in eight decades, millions of people in São Paulo are facing water outages.


Tags: Brazil, urban, water, urban ecology, climate change, environment depend, sustainability, agriculture, food production.


Via Seth Dixon
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Miles Gibson's curator insight, November 23, 2014 12:30 PM

Unit 1 nature and perspectives of geography

This map shows the time lapse of a lake in Sao Paulo in Brazil and shows how the water is running low.

This relates to unit 1 because it shows the maps as It is a GPS map and a GIS layering map. This a basic definable part of this unit because of its maps, scale, sense of place, identity, and overall relativity. This is a simple GIS layering map over the Jaguari resovoir.

Adilson Camacho's curator insight, November 23, 2014 4:59 PM

adicionar a sua visão ...

Jake Red Dorman's curator insight, November 25, 2014 12:49 PM

Brazil’s largest city, Sao Paulo, which provides one third of the countries GPD, is now running low or water due to one of the worst droughts in 8 years. There are more than 21 million people in this city and 13 million of them are facing water outages. If it doesn't rain soon, the city could face a collapse. The city has blamed the drought of lack of water in the vapor clouds that the amazon usually provides to the city. They also blame it on deforestation and global warming. President Dilma Rousseff has questioned the cities misusage of their water supply, claiming that the city mismanaged their water supply.  

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Mapping Migration in the United States

Mapping Migration in the United States | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
An interactive map showing nationwide migration patterns in the United States since 1900.
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High Security Borders

High Security Borders | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
Accelerated through the fear from the attacks of 9/11 and all what followed, the so called ‘Western Society’ is constructing the greatest wall ever build on this planet. On different building sites on all five inhabitable continents, walls, fences and high-tech border surveillance are under construction in order to secure the citizens and their high quality of life within this system. The fall of the Berlin Wall was described as the historical moment that marks the demolition of world’s last barrier between nation states. Yet it took the European Union only six years to create with the Schengen Agreement in 1995 a new division only 80km offset to the east of Berlin.

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Miles Gibson's curator insight, February 13, 11:04 AM

Unit 4 political geography 

This article explains how the world is filled with division and segregation. Some of the most notable are the walls are the wall in berlin, the wall/border/river/fence between the u.s. and mexico and the border between north and south Korea is the most notable walls.

This article relates to unit 4 because it shows how people, through borders, have divided them through history creating new politics, culture and borders themselves. The political processes involved can change the policies and shapes of nations in the world.

Monika Fleischmann's curator insight, February 15, 4:48 AM
Seth Dixon's insight:

This map shows that hi-tech political surveillance of borders is highly correlated with the core areas of the global economy and some of the most attractive immigrant destinations.  

 

Questions to Ponder: What else do you see in this map?  What does this say about the world order?  Are there patterns that this map reveals/conceals?   


tom cockburn's curator insight, Today, 5:19 AM

More than simple  'culture clash' or  'politics of fear' etc

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Projects - White

Projects - White | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
FCHSAPGEO's insight:

Urbanization

How does this compare/contrast with the forward thrust capital of Brasilia?

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100 Years of National Geographic Maps

100 Years of National Geographic Maps | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
Since 1915, National Geographic cartographers have charted earth, seas, and skies in maps capable of evoking dreams.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 4, 12:47 PM

Maps chart places, but the very act of making them can also reshape how we think about places and alter history.


Tags: historicalmapping, National Geographic.

Bharat Employment's curator insight, February 5, 12:35 AM

www.bharatemployment.com

Matt Davidson's curator insight, February 5, 5:17 AM

Beautiful article on an amazing organisation - the history of maps and map-making tells us so much about how people have viewed the world through history - great for year 7.

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Is Your Neighborhood Changing? It Might Be Youthification, Not Gentrification

Is Your Neighborhood Changing? It Might Be Youthification, Not Gentrification | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
One urban planning professor has defined this as a process that occurs in discrete stages.

 

Much has been made of the wave of millennials moving to cities. In intriguing new work, geographer and urban planner Markus Moos of the University of Waterloo gives the phenomenon a name: “youthification.” Moos defines youthfication as the “influx of young adults into higher density” cities and neighborhoods. And in some ways these neighborhoods are “forever young,” where new cohorts of young people continue to move in as families and children cycle out in search of more space.

 

Tags: neighborhood, gentrification, urban, place, culture, economic.


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Norka McAlister's curator insight, February 14, 7:50 PM

As opportunities are continually found in big cities, so too are young people migrating to these prosperous cities. Culture in the youth population has been restructured with new ideas, open mindedness, freedom, and also how the city offers many comforts. They plan out their future in the city because it has so many amenities, with amazing transportation in between other areas. Expectations are raised because young people consider things in different perspectives. New urban developments such as old manufacturing buildings being converted into housing apartments offer the youth suitable living arrangements and accommodations. However, mature populations keep being displaced to the suburban areas, due to different expectations. Older people prefer more relaxation in their lives and they are not very interested in the most advanced technologies. As young people keep moving to the big cities, these highly populated areas have to structure new patterns to develop urban sections.

Cass Allan's curator insight, February 17, 7:45 PM

Changing neighbourhoods

ZiyCharMatt's curator insight, February 20, 12:09 PM

Youthifacation

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The Stunning Geography of Incarceration

The Stunning Geography of Incarceration | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
America has more than 5,000 prisons. This is what they look like on our landscape.


Begley’s images capture the massive scale of this entire industry and the land that we devote to it (America has less than 5 percent of the world’s population but houses a quarter of the world’s prisoners). His website, in fact, includes only about 14 percent of all of the prisons he’s captured (each one is scaled to the same size).


Tags: remote sensing, land use, geospatial, landscape. 


Via Seth Dixon
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Bob Beaven's curator insight, January 29, 2:27 PM

This article is interesting from a geographic and social perspective, because the overhead pictures show just how much we alter the land with our prisons.  What is really interesting is how the US has less than five percent of the world's population but has one quarter of its prisoners.  Because of this, it can be inferred that the country has many prisons.  Yet, what astonished me about the prisons is that they seem to be out in the middle of nowhere.  The buildings seem expansive on the landscape and dominate it.  It just makes me wonder, how much does the United States spend on building and up-keeping these complexes.

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35 maps that explain how America is a nation of immigrants

35 maps that explain how America is a nation of immigrants | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
Take a tour through America's immigrant heritage — at its most and least welcoming


American politicians, and Americans themselves, love to call themselves "a nation of immigrants": a place where everyone's family has, at some point, chosen to come to seek freedom or a better life. America has managed to maintain that self-image through the forced migration of millions of African slaves, restrictive immigration laws based on fears of "inferior" races, and nativist movements that encouraged immigrants to assimilate or simply leave.

But while the reality of America's immigrant heritage is more complicated than the myth, it's still a fundamental truth of the country's history. It's impossible to understand the country today without knowing who's been kept out, who's been let in, and how they've been treated once they arrive.

Tags: migration, map.


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Lora Tortolani's curator insight, January 28, 9:30 PM

Being a ELED major, this will be a great teaching tool.

Edgar Manasseh Jr.'s curator insight, January 28, 11:52 PM

its a very powerful insight especially with the slave trade. America has always been a country that depended upon immigrants for help. Immigrants have more importance towards this country more than anyone else, this is a raised immigrant nation whether some people like it or not. Some people need to realize that blood sweat and tears have all came from the immigrants, as much as its hard to realize for some people a lot of immigrants have worked hard to build this nation that we call home today.

Bob Beaven's curator insight, January 29, 2:19 PM

This article is highly interesting in both historical and social contexts.  The article asserts that the United States is a nation of immigrants and there is really no such thing as just "American".  The article even states that Native Americans themselves, at one point in ancient history, crossed a land bridge that was between Russia and Alaska.  Another interesting point of the article was the fact that many of the Latino immigrants today are actually picking up the English language faster than the European immigrants of old.  Interestingly, this article leads to the conclusion that the "New World" is really comprised of immigrants of the "Old World".

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Complex International Borders

More complex international borders in this follow up to part 1. 
In this video I look at even more enclaves and exclaves."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 9, 8:09 AM

This video (like part 1) shows some great examples of how the political organization of space and administration of borders can get complicated.  Here are the examples (and time in the video when they are covered in the video) on these complex borders:


Tags: borders, political, territoriality, sovereignty, video.

harrison babbitt's curator insight, February 1, 2:09 PM

this correlates with unit 4 political geography because it is showing a nation state.

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Inside The Indiana Megadairy Making Coca-Cola's New Milk

Inside The Indiana Megadairy Making Coca-Cola's New Milk | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
Coca-Cola got a lot of attention in November when it announced it was going into the milk business. In fact, its extra-nutritious milk product was invented by some dairy farmers in Indiana.

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Brian Wilk's curator insight, January 22, 6:38 PM

I work for PepsiCo and Coca-Cola needed to do this to stay competitive with us. We distribute Muscle Milk and have had a head start on this growing beverage segment for the consumer looking for protein. Hopefully KO can generate a successful product and challenge their main rivals to come up with a better product so that the consumer can win. Our product is also shelf stable and could be a viable alternative to help with the war on hunger in less developed countries. Here's hoping for KO to be in the game and for PEP to rise to the challenge!

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, January 23, 12:25 PM

unit 5

Norka McAlister's curator insight, February 2, 5:11 PM

As the main producer of certain crops and hogs, the state of Indiana has been chosen by Coca-Cola to spearhead a new innovative project regarding an improved flavor of milk in the future. Indiana’s prime location and abundance of raw materials positively contributed to the decision to establish the project’s headquarters in this state. As a result, it is expected that this innovation will boost Indiana’s economy and create for jobs and advancements in technology. This project allows Coca-Cola the opportunity to expand its brand and offer healthier beverage options to the consumer.

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Urbanisation joins mining and farming as threat to Great Barrier Reef

Urbanisation joins mining and farming as threat to Great Barrier Reef | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
THE battered Great Barrier Reef may yet face its most damaging issue — urban pollution from millions of people.

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Sally Egan's curator insight, August 31, 2014 6:27 PM

Ecosystems at risk- great releveance to case study or GBR as an ecosystem at risk.

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, September 2, 2014 6:36 PM

Option - marine environments and managementmanagement

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The Geographic Advantage

The Geographic Advantage | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
We are living in an era of receding glaciers, accelerating loss of species habitat, unprecedented population migration, growing inequalities within and between nations, rising concerns over resource depletion, and shifting patterns of interaction and identity. This website provides 11 geographic investigations aligned to the geographic questions in the NRC Understanding Our Changing Planet report. The report focuses on the future directions in the geographical sciences and how these key questions will guide research to help us understand the planet on which we live.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 24, 2:54 PM

The four aspects the geographic advantage (as conceptualized by former AAG president Susan Hanson and solidified by the AAG team--see powerpoint) are:

1.  Relationships between people and the environment

2.  Importance of spatial variability

3.  Processes operating an multiple and interlocking geographic scales

4.  The integration of spatial and temporal analysis

 

To ensure that this advantage is harnessed, the AAG prepared 11 modules within these 4 categories of key issue facing the world:

--Environmental Change

--Sustainability

--Rapid Spatial Reorganization

--Technological Change


Tags unit 1 GeoprinciplesK12STEMsustainability, environment, spatial, technology.

tom cockburn's curator insight, Today, 5:09 AM

Affects us all

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Study: Millions of gallons of oil on Gulf of Mexico floor

Study: Millions of gallons of oil on Gulf of Mexico floor | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
The lingering oil left by Deepwater Horizon in the Gulf of Mexico creates a potential contamination hazard for the food chain.
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With Porches And Parks, A Texas Community Aims For Urban Utopia

With Porches And Parks, A Texas Community Aims For Urban Utopia | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
Austin's Mueller neighborhood is a new-urbanist dream, designed to be convivial, walkable and energy-efficient. Every house has a porch or stoop, and all the cars are hidden away.

 

After moving here, respondents said, they spend an average of 90 fewer minutes a week in the car, and most reported higher levels of physical activity.  The poll results seem to validate new-urbanist gospel: good design, like sidewalks, street lighting, extensive trails and parkland, can improve social and physical health.  Part II: A Texas Community Takes on Racial Tensions Once Hidden Under The Surface.

 

Tags: housing, urban, planning, urbanism, unit 7 cities, neighborhood, podcast.


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Italy is a 'dying country' says minister as birth rate plummets

Italy is a 'dying country' says minister as birth rate plummets | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
New figures show the lowest total number of births since the formation of the modern Italian state
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Here's What the World Would Look Like—If Maps Were Based on Population

Here's What the World Would Look Like—If Maps Were Based on Population | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
A Reddit user creates a map showing just how big Asia is and, well, how small everything else is.
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Map of Europe 1914 - 2014

Map of Europe 1914 - 2014 | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
When Gavrilo Princip assassinated Archduke Franz Ferdinand, the heir to the Austro-Hungarian throne, on June 28 1914, few could have known it would reverberate for four years of brutal war, leading to the fall of three European empires and revolution in what would become the Soviet Union. The past 100 years have seen another World War and the rise and fall of the Soviet Union, but much of present-day Europe is based on the lines drawn following the conflict sparked by Princip's bullet.

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Rowena Spence Cortina's curator insight, February 4, 11:11 AM

This map has a cool slider feature so that you can compare 1914 and 2014.  

Jamin's curator insight, February 21, 4:14 AM

Une double carte superposée comparant l'Europe en 1914 et en 2014. Il suffit de pousser le curseur vers la droite ou vers la gauche pour faire apparaître l'une ou l'autre carte. Un document intéressant pour voir l'évolution du territoire européen en un siècle. Première.

 

Kent College History's curator insight, February 23, 2:17 PM

Brilliant little map of Europe comparing national borders in 1914 and 2014.

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The Most Common Job In Every State

The Most Common Job In Every State | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

"The jobs picture has changed profoundly since the 1970s. This interactive map and accompanying charts show how those changes played out across the country."

 

Tags: economic, labor, USA, transportation, industry.


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Rich Schultz's curator insight, February 11, 11:21 AM

Look at all of those truck drivers!

Luis Cesar Nunes's curator insight, February 12, 2:31 PM

job in USA

Norka McAlister's curator insight, February 14, 7:48 PM

With the new millennium, jobs have been changed. Also, with new technology, which has led to an increased unemployment rate, different kind of jobs have shifted during the last past two decades. Driver trucks are one of the vast modes of transportation in the U.S. and between Mexico and Canada. It does not require too much to be a tractor-trailer truck operator. Usually, the drivers have a high school diploma and attend a professional truck-driving school. As the economy grows, the demand for goods will increase, and more truck drivers will be needed to keep supply chains moving. Truck drivers provide an essential service to industrialized societies by transporting finished goods and raw materials over land, typically to and from manufacturing plants, retail, and distribution centers. As technology continues to advance, massive globalization seems to be a better option for the economy. Driver trucks present a good chance in the workforce. As a result, driver truck careers are projected to grow 11% between 2012 and 2022. Furthermore, truck driving is a part of American lifestyle, and one of the fastest growing of all occupations.

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Quiz: Can you name a food just by looking at where it comes from?

Quiz: Can you name a food just by looking at where it comes from? | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
I map the food, you tell me what it is.

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Sharon's curator insight, February 10, 11:05 AM
washington post quiz on food produced in usa
Lora Tortolani's curator insight, February 11, 8:44 PM

Another great tool to use when teaching kids where our food comes from.  I love quizzes like these!

Gabriel Olson's curator insight, February 13, 2:59 PM

We ought to know something about where our food comes from...

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How American Agriculture Works

How American Agriculture Works | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
There really are two different Americas: the heartland, and the coasts....

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Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, January 27, 4:46 PM

My uncles in Iowa grow corn for ethanol.  They have a small crop where they grow corn they consume.  It is literally the best corn I've ever had.  I'm actually surprised Rhode Island produces almost $4mil in sweet corn.  I'm amazed that Mass produces $100 mil in cranberries.  I've seen a few cranberry bogs close down.  We produce so much why can't we actually feed everyone?  

Diane Johnson's curator insight, January 28, 8:47 PM

Useful data for sustainability discussions

Bob Beaven's curator insight, January 29, 2:38 PM

These maps are interesting, in the fact that the heartland of the United States differs so much from either coast.  Both the coasts, as seen in the first map grow fruits and vegetables.  The center of the country grows wheat, and wheat is the dominant  crop of the country.  This might account for the reason why fruits and vegetables are more expensive than grain based products.  The second map helps to drive home this point even further, of how different the coasts are from the heartland.  What I also thought was funny, however, was the author's comment that it looks like an electoral map.  Perhaps, the reason heartland states tend to side with each other and republicans is because of shared interests in the political arena.

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Worldwide, Many See Belief in God as Essential to Morality

Worldwide, Many See Belief in God as Essential to Morality | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

"The position [that belief in God is essential to morality] is highly prevalent, if not universal, in Africa and the Middle East. At least three-quarters in all six countries surveyed in Africa say that faith in God is essential to morality.   People in richer nations tend to place less emphasis on the need to believe in God to have good values than people in poorer countries do."


Via Seth Dixon
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God Is.'s curator insight, January 20, 7:49 AM

Interesting data in several different ways...Can draw different conclusions from this, and perhaps shed light on things that need to be modified/changed as it pertains to our belief... A balancing act of sorts...Thank you for curating this... Maybe it will help will cure certain beliefs we hold, individually, and collectively...

Jason Schneider's curator insight, January 26, 7:37 PM

It would make sense that Indonesia is one of the most religious countries in the world being that it has the highest Muslim population. Also, I never thought of Europe as being religious countries which is why I am not surprised that 70% of Europe does not believe that the belief in God needs to be moral. Another reason why I am not surprised is because they are more popular for their ethnic groups such as the french group, italian group and german group. Also, they don't have focused religions. For example, Buddhism was originated in Nepal and worshipped mostly in China, Hinduism was originated in India, Jewish was originated in Israel and Islam was originated in Saudi Arabia and it's practiced mostly in Indonesia and Pakistan. That explains why most parts of Asia (at least southern Asia) has practices specific religions.

Chris Plummer's curator insight, January 27, 11:58 PM

Summary- This figure explains the relationship between regions and their morality based on a God. It is evident what in North America is is almost a 50 50 tie between between believing in god is essential for morality. Only is Europe does God seem less important than the rest of the world. There are other countries such as Chile, Argentina, or Australia that have these same beliefs, but for the most part, most countries see a believe in God as an essential to morality. 

 

Insight- In unit 3 we study the distributions of many things, religion included. Why do so many poorer countries have a stronger faith in God than wealthier ones? It may be because if their ethnic backgrounds, but I think there is more to it. I think when a country is poorer, more people reach out to their God for help. I also think that in wealthier countries there are distractions from religion such as video games and other mass produced technologies that get in the way of people researching their faith.

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-stan by your land

Central Asia is full of lands whose names end in -stan. A certain powerful North American country has a related name. How? It's not your standard explanation...

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Chris Plummer's curator insight, January 21, 7:21 AM

Summary- In this video, it explains way so many easter countries end in -stan. Pakistan, Turkistan, and Kyrgyzstan are all examples of this. Turns our, -stan is the persian word for country. Thats why all the countries neighboring Iran have all been influenced by this, with -stan as the last part of the country name. Iran also havs -stans within its borders as well. There are also places ending is -stan which aren't part of the origin 7 -stans. Independence movements, historical regions, and administrative regions and in -stan as well. 

 

Insight - In unit 3, one of the the main things we study is why are places named what they are and why do languages diffuse. In this case, all these places are named what they are because of the ethnic group living in that area is defying their territory as a state(country). I saw the -stan diffusion as a form of contagious diffusion. It kept spreading outward from Iran to a lot of states north east of it. 

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, January 23, 12:10 PM

unit 2

Tyler Anson's curator insight, February 23, 10:37 AM

This video is cool because it shows the diffusion of name from one of the original languages of the world. It goes to show how all these countries in Asia end in -stan just because of what it means (loosely translates to "land"). This video shows the diffusion of language over time.

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Dramatic Confluences

Dramatic Confluences | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

"Confluences occur wherever two streams come together. If the gradient is low (i.e., nearly level) and the properties of the two streams are very different, the confluences may be characterized by a dramatic visible distinction as the mixing occurs only slowly."

 

Tags:  physical, fluvial, geomorphology, erosion, landscape.


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Sylvain Rotillon's curator insight, January 7, 5:47 AM

Wonderful pictures of rivers confluences

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Fragile States Index

Fragile States Index | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

"Weak and failing states pose a challenge to the international community. In today’s world, with its highly globalized economy, information systems and interlaced security, pressures on one fragile state can have serious repercussions not only for that state and its people, but also for its neighbors and other states halfway across the globe.  The Fragile States Index (FSI), produced by The Fund for Peace, is a critical tool in highlighting not only the normal pressures that all states experience, but also in identifying when those pressures are pushing a state towards the brink of failure."


Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 27, 2014 3:31 PM

How can political stability and security be measured?  What constitutes effective governance?  The Fragile States Index (formerly known as the Failed States Index) is a statistical ranking designed to measure the effective political institutions across the globe.  There are  12 social, economic, and political/military categories that are a part of the overall rankings and various indicators are parts of the metrics that are a part of this index are:

SOCIAL

•Demographic Pressures 

•Refugees/IDPs

•Group Grievance

•Human Flight and Brain Drain

ECONOMIC

•Uneven Economic Development

•Poverty and Economic Decline

POLITICAL/MILITARY

•State Legitimacy

•Human Rights and Rule of Law

•Public Services

•Security Apparatus

•Factionalized Elites

•External Intervention


Tags: political, statisticsdevelopment, territoriality, sovereignty, conflict, political, devolution, war.

Melissa Marshall's curator insight, August 28, 2014 12:57 AM

How can political stability and security be measured? The Fragile States Index is a statistical ranking designed to measure the effective political institutions across the globe.

MsPerry's curator insight, September 1, 2014 9:49 AM

APHG-Unit 4