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Life in Chechnya

Life in Chechnya | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
Photojournalist Diana Markosian spent the last year and half covering Russia's volatile North Caucasus region.

 

These 33 photos are arranged to tell the cultural story of life in Chechnya, especially the life of young women coming of age in the aftermath of the war.  As the architecture of this mosque suggests, the influence of traditional Islamic values and Russian political authority have greatly shaped the lives of the Chechen people.


Via Seth Dixon, Kelly Reagan
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Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, February 18, 2014 3:24 PM

These pictures show many examples to how life in Chechnya for women is very different for women in the United States. We can see that these woman take part in similar day to day activities, but in very different ways. This is why their lives overall are much different than ours.

Shanelle Zaino's curator insight, October 15, 2014 10:49 PM

The images I was able to see were moving. The image that stands out most were the children in gym class. Young men were able to wear gym like clothing and the girls needed to be covered head to toe wearing dresses.Powerful.I was able to see only a few and the rest seemed to be lightened to the point where you could not see them anymore. The words also seemed to be blocked out. =(

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 8, 2014 12:28 PM

These photos show the culture of Chechnya. I found them very effective at mixing the environmental and cultural aspects of the area in these pictures. The one where two young people are on a date in a barren snow covered park sitting on opposites sides of the bench because close physical contact is forbidden before marriage. Although the school gym shows how women have to be dressed modestly even when they are exercising. 

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Why Geography Education Matters

Why Geography Education Matters | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

"This blog-a-thon submission comes from Joseph Kerski of the National Council of Geographic Education (2011 President). Joseph writes about why geography education matters and how it applies to each one of us."

 

 

This was one great orange! Thank you GS!

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austin tydings's comment, August 27, 2013 2:41 PM
Geography, is a subject where it takes all the skills from science, math, English, and social studies, and combines it into a in depth thinking class. It makes you find the problem, fix it and tell how and why you fixed it . For example, a crop is not growing in a dry area, then you try it in a wet area and it grows, now you have to find out why it grows in a wet area and not a dry area and explain why. It is good to start out early learning about the basics in the core classes then later in the more advance classes, to understand how to fix a problem.
Annenkov's curator insight, September 13, 2013 2:09 AM

"Geography education applies to each one of us" - not only for children, but for adults in everyday life. Who is interested in developing a personal geoculture?  

Peter Phillips's curator insight, October 5, 2013 7:37 PM

Using an orange to learn the continents of the Earth :) great idea. 

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How does the United Nations work?

"Ever curious about the reaches of the United Nation and what they do? Here's a great video featuring Dr. Binoy Kampmark from RMIT University.  This short video can help improve your understanding of the UN, including its role in world politics and policy making."


Via Seth Dixon
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zane alan berger's curator insight, March 25, 5:32 PM

this video explains- as it says in it's headline- how the UN works. It essentially covers the different operations the UN takes part in to maintain world peace; ranging from security to human rights to disease and so on. It also talks about the security council which consists of France, the UK, US, China, and Russia, along with the general assembly.

Norka McAlister's curator insight, March 25, 9:11 PM

The United Nations (UN) constantly works on maintaining international peace, economic issues, and cultural and human rights around the world. The UN has a tremendous impact around the world, with 193 nations participating in frequent meeting about how to resolve global and domestic issues and making policies for the world. The UN plays an important role in &maintain[ing] international peace and security; to develop friendly relations among nations; to operate in solving international problems and in promoting respect for human rights; and finally to be a center for harmonizing the actions of nations&(WWW.UN.org). The UN has a lot of responsibilities as it tries to keep the whole world at peace.

Carlee Allen's curator insight, March 26, 7:03 PM

This is a very short and simplified video that explains all about what the UN is and what they do. The UN plays a major role in helping developing countries and taking part with them if they are in need of help or in a crisis. This video also explains what the security council is and what they do.

 

I already knew most of the things mentioned in the video, but I always think that UN things are interesting and I'm always willing to learn more about what they do and how they are helping the world.

 

 

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City of Vancouver Food Strategy: What Feeds Us

City of Vancouver Food Strategy: What Feeds Us | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
Launched in January 2013, the City of Vancouver’s Food Strategy represents the culmination of over ten years of policy, planning and community organizin
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First photographs emerge of new Pacific island off Tonga

First photographs emerge of new Pacific island off Tonga | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

The first photographs have emerged of a newly formed volcanic island in the Pacific Ocean after three men climbed to the peak of the land mass off the coast of Tonga. Experts believe a volcano exploded underwater and then expanded until an island formed. The island is expected to erode back into the ocean in a matter of months.


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Coco Angus's curator insight, March 17, 4:45 PM

Mountain building 

WebGems SNMinc's curator insight, March 18, 12:20 AM

Spectacular view!

Ricardo Cabeza de Vaca's curator insight, March 24, 1:38 AM

I think this is a article about how a whole new island came up from a volcanic eruption. It gets even more interesting when you realize that it will disappear in a matter of months. This article shows photographs of this new island and information about it. I thought it was pretty interesting how seabirds are already laying eggs on the island!

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What’s in a Nickname? In the case of Chiraq, a Whole Lot

What’s in a Nickname? In the case of Chiraq, a Whole Lot | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

"Nicknames are important branding strategies used by civic boosters, and Chicago’s namesakes are frequently employed to market the city and its surrounding region as 'The Jewel of the Midwest' and 'Heart of America.' At the same time, urban monikers can arise from the wider public and they have sometimes been used to draw attention to negative qualities of Chicago life."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 11, 9:37 PM

Is it Londonderry or just Derry?  Xinjiang or Eastern Turkestan?  The Sea of Japan or the East Sea?  Persian Gulf or Arabian Gulf?  Names and nicknames have political and cultural overtones that can be very important.  As the author of this AAG article on the Chicago's nickname, Chiraq says, "city nicknames are more than a gimmick; they can define geographies of violence, marginalization, and resistance."


Tags: Chicago, urban, place, language, toponyms.

Norka McAlister's curator insight, March 15, 8:07 PM

Illinois has been stigmatized by many negative nicknames such as "Killinois," "Shot-town," and "Chiraq." Urban crime hs always been a problem in the city of Chicago, and the most remarkable areas are on the south side of Chicago. High unemployment, poor neighborhoods, and lack of parenting/mentoring, and failing school districts all contribute to the number of young people turning to steet crime in order for survival. With so many gangs acitivities on the street, Chiraq is a city of violence and war. Chaos on the street and the killings of many innocent people increasing, government  officials needs to react with strict regulations in order to stop this violence. Poor economic status has played a significant role in the deterioration of the city. Citizen who were once classified as middle have become a part of the poor class. The relocation of housing projects in proximity to wealthier communities has instilled fear of the expansion of gang violence and activity within residents of these communities.

Lauren Quincy's curator insight, March 19, 12:53 PM

Unit 3: Cultural Practices and Processes

 

This article is about how Chicago's many nicknames represent its culture and people's sense of the place. Many people have began to call Chicago by the name of "Chiraaq" and mixture of Iraq and Chicago. This is due to the violences in the city and resemblence to the action in Iraq. The nickname’s power, politically, is the way in which naming functions as a form of shaming and the name has been advertised on shirts, posters and even songs putting it into the category of pop-culture. As suggested in research, place names are not confined to official nomenclature on maps, but also include competing, vernacular systems of naming. Chicago’s many nicknames provide insight into the different ways that people frame and reconfigure the image of the city for the wider world.


This relates to unit 3 because it deals with vernacular regions and popular culture. The different names of Chicago are often not defined with a definite boundary of the city, rather an individuals opinion or idea of the area. They are often very vague with the names such as "Paris on the Prairie" that not only include Chicago but neighboring towns and cities as well. Or the opposite, where the name "Sweet Home" may only be referring to a portion of the city rather than the entire city of Chicago. The names, such as Chiraq, also fall under pop-culture when they become a widely known idea and are adopted by many sources. The advertisement and use of the nickname in songs and merchandise shows the wide range of distribution for the nickname. The use of the word is often changing and will be popular for a short period of time as popular culture is always changing. 

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Our Blessed Homeland

Our Blessed Homeland | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it



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Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, March 14, 9:12 AM

unit 3

Evan Margiotta's curator insight, March 19, 3:45 PM

How we view each other is often incredibly rash. This cartoon displays this very well. Other cultures often seems as alien as other species. However if one looks closely they can find many similarities in their cultures. This misunderstanding of culture has been at the root of many disputes and the understanding of culture has been the road to understanding  and peace. Unit 3 Culture

Michael Amberg's curator insight, March 22, 2:24 PM

This picture definitely sums up almost all the wars in history, how one side is right, and one side is wrong, but according to the two sides the enemy is the one who is evil.

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These twins can teach us a lot about racial identity

These twins can teach us a lot about racial identity | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
Maria says she's black and Lucy says she's white. Together, they prove none of this makes sense.

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Savannah Rains's curator insight, March 24, 2:43 AM

Ethnicity is a man made classification of humans. We are all from the same earth correct? we are all made and born the same way correct? But for some strange reason we felt the need to divide ourselves and make pretend hate and hierarchy between people. This article proves just how weak the titles we put on ourselves are. Twins Lucy and Maria Aylmer were born but to everyone's surprise, one was "black" and one was "white". Does this make them biracial? can they flip flop what they wasn't to be? My personal ties to this article are surprising. I often feel like I am not the ethnicity I am labeled as. Both of my parents are "white" but I am always asked if I am "black" on top of that I have learned that I accept black culture and tastes more then white style. Does this make me a poser? or am I simply the victim of this false labeling we humans do. This article made it clear and fun to explore the ideas of ethnicity in a new light.

Gareth Jukes's curator insight, March 24, 12:57 PM

Cultural differences in attitudes toward gender-

This article explains how to twins do not care about each other's color, but how they are friends and help one another. They are both supportive to one another, and wish the best for eachother.

 

This portrays the idea of cultural differences in attitudes toward gender because both of them do not care what color they are and what gender, therefore, they have identical attitudes toward gender.

zane alan berger's curator insight, March 24, 3:45 PM

This article relating to Unit 3 (culture) headlines a story about twins of different races. In the blog it argues two cases; one being that this proves how far-fetched racial categorization is and the other being that they categorize themselves as black or white

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Human Landscapes of Canada

Human Landscapes of Canada | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
Canada is a massive country, yet it has one of the lowest population densities in the world. Despite this, Canadians have made a wide impact on their land, much of it visible from aerial and satellite photography. Hydroelectric facilities, roads, mines, farms, ports, resource exploration, logging, canals, cities, and towns have altered much of the landscape over the years.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 10, 4:39 PM

This is a great set of images showing the human impact on the environment, with a special nod to our neighbors for the north.  These images have an artistic beauty and I hope every geographer maintains a sense of wonder at the details and beauty of the Earth. 


TagsCanada, images, art, remote sensing, land use, landscape

Bharat Employment's curator insight, February 23, 1:02 AM
http://www.bharatemployment.com/
Vincent Lahondère's curator insight, March 8, 11:20 AM

Un vrai plaisir

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The Geographic Advantage

The Geographic Advantage | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
We are living in an era of receding glaciers, accelerating loss of species habitat, unprecedented population migration, growing inequalities within and between nations, rising concerns over resource depletion, and shifting patterns of interaction and identity. This website provides 11 geographic investigations aligned to the geographic questions in the NRC Understanding Our Changing Planet report. The report focuses on the future directions in the geographical sciences and how these key questions will guide research to help us understand the planet on which we live.

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tom cockburn's curator insight, February 27, 5:09 AM

Affects us all

Daniel Lindahl's curator insight, March 20, 6:17 PM

This article by the AAG emphasizes that in order to provide a healthier, more prospering world, we need to do 4 things. These 4 things are: environmental change, promote sustainability, spatial reorganization of the economy and society, and harness technological change. This will allow us to create more long term and sustainable geographic patterns. 

Elle Reagan's curator insight, March 22, 10:02 PM

I really liked this article as it was interactive. I was able to pick out the area of geography I wanted to learn about and then it took me to another page that gave me more in-depth explanations. It was an overall good refresher on different aspects of geography with emphasis on how we react with our environment. 

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Study: Millions of gallons of oil on Gulf of Mexico floor

Study: Millions of gallons of oil on Gulf of Mexico floor | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
The lingering oil left by Deepwater Horizon in the Gulf of Mexico creates a potential contamination hazard for the food chain.
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With Porches And Parks, A Texas Community Aims For Urban Utopia

With Porches And Parks, A Texas Community Aims For Urban Utopia | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
Austin's Mueller neighborhood is a new-urbanist dream, designed to be convivial, walkable and energy-efficient. Every house has a porch or stoop, and all the cars are hidden away.

 

After moving here, respondents said, they spend an average of 90 fewer minutes a week in the car, and most reported higher levels of physical activity.  The poll results seem to validate new-urbanist gospel: good design, like sidewalks, street lighting, extensive trails and parkland, can improve social and physical health.  Part II: A Texas Community Takes on Racial Tensions Once Hidden Under The Surface.

 

Tags: housing, urban, planning, urbanism, unit 7 cities, neighborhood, podcast.


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Italy is a 'dying country' says minister as birth rate plummets

Italy is a 'dying country' says minister as birth rate plummets | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
New figures show the lowest total number of births since the formation of the modern Italian state
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Lydia Tsao's curator insight, March 23, 11:14 PM

Because Italy is considered a highly developed country in the world, its rapidly declining birth rate is not surprising to me. Low birth rates is one of the defining characteristics of developed countries. This is largely because of the empowerment of women in these countries. The women in highly developed countries are not bound by their families and societal pressure to marry young and have many children. With higher levels of education, women in these countries pursue their careers rather than focus on marriage and birthing. Another factor is that Italy has a good social welfare system for the elderly. Because of that, young people do not need to have a lot of children to support them in old age since the government will essentially take care of them as elders. Japan, a country with one of the lowest birth rates in the world, is also facing the consequences of a decreasing population. The country is building human-like robots to take over empty job positions.

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Here's What the World Would Look Like—If Maps Were Based on Population

Here's What the World Would Look Like—If Maps Were Based on Population | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
A Reddit user creates a map showing just how big Asia is and, well, how small everything else is.
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Lydia Tsao's curator insight, March 23, 11:25 PM

This map show how the size of a country does not determine the population of a country. Instead, it is culture, immigration, and opportunity that determine the population of a country. China and India have always had the largest populations in the world since the Indian Empire and the Qing Dynasty. The resources of a country also control the fate of population in a country. Countries with a lot of resources have a lot of people because they are able to sustain such a large population. While Russia and Canada are large countries, people usually immigrate out of these countries to seek better opportunities in neighboring countries.

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How does the United Nations work?

"Ever curious about the reaches of the United Nation and what they do? Here's a great video featuring Dr. Binoy Kampmark from RMIT University.  This short video can help improve your understanding of the UN, including its role in world politics and policy making."


Via Seth Dixon
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zane alan berger's curator insight, March 25, 5:32 PM

this video explains- as it says in it's headline- how the UN works. It essentially covers the different operations the UN takes part in to maintain world peace; ranging from security to human rights to disease and so on. It also talks about the security council which consists of France, the UK, US, China, and Russia, along with the general assembly.

Norka McAlister's curator insight, March 25, 9:11 PM

The United Nations (UN) constantly works on maintaining international peace, economic issues, and cultural and human rights around the world. The UN has a tremendous impact around the world, with 193 nations participating in frequent meeting about how to resolve global and domestic issues and making policies for the world. The UN plays an important role in &maintain[ing] international peace and security; to develop friendly relations among nations; to operate in solving international problems and in promoting respect for human rights; and finally to be a center for harmonizing the actions of nations&(WWW.UN.org). The UN has a lot of responsibilities as it tries to keep the whole world at peace.

Carlee Allen's curator insight, March 26, 7:03 PM

This is a very short and simplified video that explains all about what the UN is and what they do. The UN plays a major role in helping developing countries and taking part with them if they are in need of help or in a crisis. This video also explains what the security council is and what they do.

 

I already knew most of the things mentioned in the video, but I always think that UN things are interesting and I'm always willing to learn more about what they do and how they are helping the world.

 

 

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Can You Name the 10 Smallest Countries in the World?

Can You Name the 10 Smallest Countries in the World? | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

"A photo gallery of the world's ten smallest countries, from 0.2 square miles on up to 115 square miles, these ten smallest countries are microstates."


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Zohair Ahmed's curator insight, March 23, 2:41 AM

This picture slide show has to do with microstates, which are states or terratories that are both small in population and in size. These microstates are mostly near the sea, or even islands. Microstates have both pros and cons. Pros include having an abundant buffer zone: the sea. Another pro would be being alone, or isolated, (sometimes) this makes them free from other countries, which can be a pro and a con. A con may be that the country may have a harder time accessing fresh water, and improving agriculture with little land. Unit 4 deals with Microstates.

Samuel Meyer's curator insight, March 23, 11:53 AM

Pitcairn Island

Vatican City

Sovereign Military Order of Malta

San Marino

Monaco

Andorra

South Ossetia

Singapore

Transdniesteia

Bahrain

 

Just a few guesses...

 

Connor Hendricks's curator insight, March 23, 4:35 PM

This shows that the world is made up of several countries of different origins. people on this small island nation could have lived there for centuries. this is a goodway to show how diverse the world is.

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'Dirty Old London': Geographies of Human Waste

'Dirty Old London': Geographies of Human Waste | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

In the 19th century, London was the capital of the largest empire the world had ever known — and it was infamously filthy. It had choking, sooty fogs; the Thames River was thick with human sewage; and the streets were covered with mud.  But according to Lee Jackson, author of Dirty Old London: The Victorian Fight Against Filth, mud was actually a euphemism. 'It was essentially composed of horse dung,' he tells Fresh Air's Sam Briger. 'There were tens of thousands of working horses in London [with] inevitable consequences for the streets. And the Victorians never really found an effective way of removing that, unfortunately.'"


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We just spoke about this in class!

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LEONARDO WILD's curator insight, March 14, 9:56 AM

The signature of un-ecological existence: Waste that goes unused by nature's circulatory systems.

Norka McAlister's curator insight, March 15, 8:09 PM

It was after the 19th century that Joseph Bazelgette invented the sewer system in London that ultimately decreased the death rate in the city. At this time, horses served as the primary mode of transportation but also caused significant health problems due to the the excrement and urine left in the streets. Although we no longer rely on horses as a main soruce of transportation, we are experiencing another type of pollution caused by the ommission of harmful gases from automobiles. Infrastructure was not ideal and appropriate for most residents in the London. Dumping wastes into the river and drinking the water without any chemical treatment was one of the major health issues with which communities struggled. However, in present day China, people and industries continue to dump wastes into the rivers where local fish are caught for consumption. The lack of urban planning in London left 15,000 people dead. With so mmany people living in such close vicinity to each other, the diseases sread rapidly and wiped  out many impoverished communcities. Innovation in public health improved sanitiation conditions with the introduction of the toilet.However, in early 20th century culture, women were not comfortable using public toilets.

Samuel Meyer's curator insight, March 23, 12:03 PM

London has come a far way from the industrial town it was in the 19th century, and is now cleaner than ever. But pollution led to many issues in London at the time. This is also evident in the developing world today, such as in China, Africa, and South America.

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In New Exam for Cabbies, Knowledge of Streets Takes a Back Seat

In New Exam for Cabbies, Knowledge of Streets Takes a Back Seat | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
New York cabbies have long had to face a rigorous set of geography questions on the test they must pass to get a license. Now those questions have disappeared.
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These Amazing Maps Show the True Diversity of Africa

These Amazing Maps Show the True Diversity of Africa | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

"African countries are also quite diverse from an ethnic standpoint. As the Washington Post's Max Fisher noted back in 2013, the world's 20 most ethnically diverse countries are all African, partially because European colonial powers divvied up sections of the continent with little regard for how the residents would have organized the land themselves. This map above shows Africa's ethnographic regions as identified by George Murdock in his 1959 ethnography of the continent."


Tags: Africa, colonialism, borders, political, language, ethnicity.


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zane alan berger's curator insight, March 24, 4:04 PM

This article relating to our culture unit proves the true diversity in Africa by broadcasting a series of maps from language spoken to ethnic background. It also briefly discusses the inconsiderate dividing of states during the Berlin conference which caused the multitude of diversity within each state.

Louis Mazza's curator insight, March 25, 7:40 PM

Africa is the most diverse continent in the world. With 1,000 to 2,000 language being spoken there. Africa also holds the world’s 20 most ethnically diverse countries. This article says that this diversity is partially due how European powers divided up sections of the continent with no regard to how the residents would adapt. There are also other countries that have tried to/or colonized African countries which has further diversified Africa. The Largest City is Lagos in Nigeria with over 8 Million people

Felix Ramos Jr.'s curator insight, March 26, 10:42 AM

It is mind-boggling how this beautiful continent is studied so little in America.  For some reason, Africa is not glorified as a ethnic melting-pot or a growing economy.  This article and subsequent maps detail how special Africa really is.  Most people think of Africa as having one race and ethnicity living in a dry desert.  This could not be further from the truth.

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Teaching the Geography of Food

Teaching the Geography of Food | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

"Food. It’s something we all think about, talk about, and need. Food has been one major topic of interest at National Geographic because it connects all of us to our environment. The recent global population projections for the year 2100 just went up from 9 billion to 11 billion, making the issues of food production and distribution all the more important.  For the last 3 years I’ve stored podcasts, articles, videos, and other resources on my personal site on a wide range of geographic issues, including food resources.  I thought that sharing 10 of my personal favorite resources on the geography of food would be helpful to understand our changing global food systems."


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Cade Bruce's curator insight, March 19, 4:32 PM

This is a perfect article for a review of the entire agriculture unit, covering agribusiness, genetic modification, hunger, and much more. This falls best under the category of Large-scale commercial agriculture and agribusiness because it describes the ways agribusiness affects agriculture, health, hunger and food waste.

Adam's curator insight, March 19, 11:10 PM

Good stuff for AG. Check out the Chipotle clips. 

Ricardo Cabeza de Vaca's curator insight, March 24, 2:29 AM

I think this article is very interesting because it is telling us to answer the questions that we always asked ourselves but never answered such as: "Where is our milk from?" This talks about world hunger, the food waste 'scandal' and organic farming. I believe we should all support famers markets and local natural farming. We should stop wasting so much food and only place on our plate how much we are going to eat. We should start thinking about the problem of world hunger and how are we going to solve it.

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The Speed Burden [Costs of Sprawl]

The Speed Burden [Costs of Sprawl] | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
The need for speed devours huge chunks of American cities and leaves the edges of the expressways worthless. Busy streets, for almost all of human history, created the greatest real estate value because they delivered customers and clients to the businesses operating there. This in turn cultivated the highest tax revenues in town, both from higher property taxes and from elevated sales taxes. But you can't set up shop on the side of an expressway. How can cities afford to spend so much to create thoroughfares with no adjoining property value?

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Alex Lewis's curator insight, March 10, 10:23 AM

This article shows the difference between extremely urbanized areas and relatively urbanized areas. Florence and Atlanta are compared. Florence has narrow streets with sharp intersections, which causes cars to drive slowly. This is safer for pedestrians. In Atlanta, the roads are wider and curves are less sharp. The most this will do is help people in Atlanta get tp their jobs slightly faster. Miami and a seaside town are also compared. The interstate in Miami takes up most of the room and there is few real estate options. In the seaside town, options are not limited, around 80% available for use. The less urbanized places are more efficient. 

 

-A.L.

Alexa Earl's curator insight, March 14, 10:48 AM

This blog really made me realize what an impact humans are to the environment. They compare different cities and talk about the impacts and it really showed me how humans have built up cities.

Brian Wilk's curator insight, March 21, 6:12 PM

A side by side comparison at first blush is striking but the devil is in the details. Florence, Italy is a city of only 368,000 while the Atlanta metro area is about 4.5 million. Agree that sprawl is ineffective real estate and efficiency wise, but fuel prices may be having a counter effect on the reduction of sprawl. It is much less expensive to commute given the price of oil at its current levels and the millennials will have a say in this urban sprawl contracting or expanding. Many do not own cars, relying on commuter systems within the city to get around. This in theory should drive down demand for fossil fuels, culminating in reduced prices for gasoline. If the infrastructure is already built, was is the cost to maintain it, given the static population of the large metro areas? Interesting to see how this plays out.

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Cityscapes of Rio de Janeiro


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A coast-to-coast picture of America's cacophony of sounds

A coast-to-coast picture of America's cacophony of sounds | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
The National Park Service mapped noise across the United States.
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Evan Margiotta's curator insight, March 20, 2:19 PM

An interesting take to mapping America. This map shows the noise created in the United States spatially. This map is very similar to a population map which makes sense seeing as how a large population obviously makes more noise. Likewise busy roads and highways are loud as well. The spacial distribution of population affects more things than just the where people live. Unit 2 Population and Migration

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The largest city in Brazil is running dangerously low on water

The largest city in Brazil is running dangerously low on water | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
Thanks to the worst drought in eight decades, millions of people in São Paulo are facing water outages.


Tags: Brazil, urban, water, urban ecology, climate change, environment depend, sustainability, agriculture, food production.


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Adilson Camacho's curator insight, November 23, 2014 4:59 PM

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Jake Red Dorman's curator insight, November 25, 2014 12:49 PM

Brazil’s largest city, Sao Paulo, which provides one third of the countries GPD, is now running low or water due to one of the worst droughts in 8 years. There are more than 21 million people in this city and 13 million of them are facing water outages. If it doesn't rain soon, the city could face a collapse. The city has blamed the drought of lack of water in the vapor clouds that the amazon usually provides to the city. They also blame it on deforestation and global warming. President Dilma Rousseff has questioned the cities misusage of their water supply, claiming that the city mismanaged their water supply.  

Lydia Tsao's curator insight, March 23, 10:16 AM

This shows just how important water is the human race. It also shows how humans have no sense of urgency in conserving water until it's too late. The saying "you never know a good thing until it's gone" applies in this case. The Brazilian government did not take any sufficient measures to conserve water until it realized how depleted the reservoir is. This event demonstrates the environmental impact of  water depletion on humans, and how humans have such a huge impact on the geographical landscape on Earth. As seen in the picture above, many greens turned yellow as a result of the lowering water levels. The river beds are soon going to be overgrown by shrubbery as water no longer exists there. These are all results of a combination of natural (lack of rain) and human causes of resource depletion.

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Mapping Migration in the United States

Mapping Migration in the United States | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
An interactive map showing nationwide migration patterns in the United States since 1900.
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Evan Margiotta's curator insight, March 21, 6:11 PM

Migration within the United States says a lot about the culture and population of a region. For instance 77% of people living in Michigan were born in Michigan and only a tiny percentage moved there from anywhere other than the Midwest. This show either that people living in Michigan have strong roots and are hard pressed to leave or that there are few pull factors in Michigan to bring people there. On the other hand only 36% of the people living in Florida were born there. This shows, along with a high population from outside the country, that Florida has strong pulling factors that convince people to move there.

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High Security Borders

High Security Borders | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
Accelerated through the fear from the attacks of 9/11 and all what followed, the so called ‘Western Society’ is constructing the greatest wall ever build on this planet. On different building sites on all five inhabitable continents, walls, fences and high-tech border surveillance are under construction in order to secure the citizens and their high quality of life within this system. The fall of the Berlin Wall was described as the historical moment that marks the demolition of world’s last barrier between nation states. Yet it took the European Union only six years to create with the Schengen Agreement in 1995 a new division only 80km offset to the east of Berlin.

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Miles Gibson's curator insight, February 13, 11:04 AM

Unit 4 political geography 

This article explains how the world is filled with division and segregation. Some of the most notable are the walls are the wall in berlin, the wall/border/river/fence between the u.s. and mexico and the border between north and south Korea is the most notable walls.

This article relates to unit 4 because it shows how people, through borders, have divided them through history creating new politics, culture and borders themselves. The political processes involved can change the policies and shapes of nations in the world.

Monika Fleischmann's curator insight, February 15, 4:48 AM
Seth Dixon's insight:

This map shows that hi-tech political surveillance of borders is highly correlated with the core areas of the global economy and some of the most attractive immigrant destinations.  

 

Questions to Ponder: What else do you see in this map?  What does this say about the world order?  Are there patterns that this map reveals/conceals?   


tom cockburn's curator insight, February 27, 5:19 AM

More than simple  'culture clash' or  'politics of fear' etc

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Projects - White

Projects - White | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
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Urbanization

How does this compare/contrast with the forward thrust capital of Brasilia?

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