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Language, Culture, and Army Culture: Failing Transformation | Small Wars Journal

Language, Culture, and Army Culture: Failing Transformation | Small Wars Journal | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

Editor's Note: COL Outzen puts forth a compelling plea for the Army to pay more attention to promoting language proficiency. The other services are similarly lacking in these fields. Although individual program managers are creating some bright spots, the truth is that poor personnel management and the burden of one-size-fits-all training preclude many servicemembers from attaining true professionalism in their fields.

Introduction

A decade of Counterinsurgency (COIN) and Counter-Terrorism (CT) operations have highlighted our military’s shortcomings in employing and understanding foreign languages, the people who speak them, and various types of knowledge derived from language communities. The Department of Defense had identified this critical capability gap by 2004, and by 2005 had directed the Services to treat language capabilities as a core warfighting skill akin to marksmanship[1]. This implied significant organizational and cultural change within the Army and sister Services, which have traditionally viewed foreign language skill as a niche meriting limited and episodic attention. Six years have elapsed, though, and the Services have failed to produce doctrine, organizations, or practices that can be considered transformative. Instead, they have applied band-aid approaches by contracting out language and related capabilities, while not reforming the way the fielded forces train for or employ language and related skills in any significant way[2]. Given emphatic calls from senior leaders such as the Secretary of Defense, Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, and Chief of Staff of the Army, it is hard to understand why the Army has made such little progress[3].

That we have not successfully transformed is beyond dispute among those paying attention since the Defense Language Transformation Roadmap was published[4]. With massive cuts to the DoD budget looming, though, simply recognizing failure is insufficient; the Army and DoD must develop coherent and effective responses sooner rather than later[5]. The response must both be effective and survive budget austerity, which rules out much of the Army’s current approach[6]. This essay offers a series of observations about why and how we have failed to transform language and related capabilities, and presents several recommendations for successfully moving ahead. The observations focus on the U.S. Army’s efforts, since the Army has the preponderance of resources and responsibilities for DoD language and culture operations, but are broadly applicable for the other Services as well.


Via Charles Tiayon
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Why Geography Education Matters

Why Geography Education Matters | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

"This blog-a-thon submission comes from Joseph Kerski of the National Council of Geographic Education (2011 President). Joseph writes about why geography education matters and how it applies to each one of us."

 

 

This was one great orange! Thank you GS!

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austin tydings's comment, August 27, 2013 2:41 PM
Geography, is a subject where it takes all the skills from science, math, English, and social studies, and combines it into a in depth thinking class. It makes you find the problem, fix it and tell how and why you fixed it . For example, a crop is not growing in a dry area, then you try it in a wet area and it grows, now you have to find out why it grows in a wet area and not a dry area and explain why. It is good to start out early learning about the basics in the core classes then later in the more advance classes, to understand how to fix a problem.
Annenkov's curator insight, September 13, 2013 2:09 AM

"Geography education applies to each one of us" - not only for children, but for adults in everyday life. Who is interested in developing a personal geoculture?  

Peter Phillips's curator insight, October 5, 2013 7:37 PM

Using an orange to learn the continents of the Earth :) great idea. 

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goingindothewild

goingindothewild | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
it was the one less traveled by, that's all you need to know.
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Countries Divided on Future of Ancient Buddhas

Countries Divided on Future of Ancient Buddhas | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
Thirteen years after the Bamian Buddhas were blasted into rubble, opinion is split on whether to leave them as is, rebuild them, or make copies of them.

Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 23, 4:22 PM

This video and article work together to show a 'behind-the-scenes' glimpse of this heritage site, or the remnants of the old memorial which is an iconic part of the cultural landscape in their own right but for very different reasons.  This is a great example of sequent occupance and some of the difficulties in preserving heritage.  Some argue that by restoring the Buddha it will undo some of the damage done by the Taliban and create a tourist destination; others think that the damaged Buddha is a poignant reminder of problems with 'topocide' and religious intolerance. 


Questions to Ponder: What do you think should become of this place?  How come?    


Tags: Afghanistan, politicalculture, Central Asialandscape, perspective.

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, March 28, 5:43 PM

Protecting significant landscapes

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 14, 5:17 PM

This video starts by talking about the issue at hand of who should recieve this specific historical site. The video and article overlap in talking about the division between which country should be entitiled to their ancestors Buddahs. This is an extremely important issue at hand the resolotion is crucial to the countries getting along again.

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The Case for Cul-de-Sacs

The Case for Cul-de-Sacs | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
People who live in them actually have greater social cohesion, according to one sociologist.

 

Thomas R. Hochschild Jr. actually first encountered the social cohesion of cul-de-sacs in his latest research when he wandered into one in Connecticut with his clipboard and polo shirt, and someone called the cops.  That never happened on the other types of streets he was studying, places where it would turn out the neighbors didn't know each other as well, and it was less clear who "belonged." Repeatedly, though, he found at the end of cul-de-sacs families who watched each others' children and took in each others' mail, who barbequed and orchestrated the removal of snow together, and who considered each other close friends. In cul-de-sacs, these families had a stronger sense of shared social space and territoriality. An outsider stood out.


Via Seth Dixon
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Alison D. Gilbert's curator insight, February 23, 8:33 PM

Living in a cul-de-sac sounds very inviting.

Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, February 24, 1:32 PM

I lived in a col-de-sac for a number of years. My family and I had very close relationships with our two neighbors within our col-de-sac. We had parties together and helped each other out in times of need - this article is spot on.  

Matt Richardson's curator insight, February 25, 10:13 AM

Interesting article about suburban design.

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No union, no pound, British official warns Scots backing independence

No union, no pound, British official warns Scots backing independence | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
LONDON – Escalating the fight against secession, the British government warned Thursday that Scotland would lose the right to continue using the pound as its currency if voters there say yes to a historic referendum on independence this fall.

 

Osborne’s stark warning, delivered in a speech in Edinburgh, the Scottish capital, represented a new willingness by unionists to take a hard line in persuading Scottish voters to shun independence in a September plebiscite. A thumbs-up would end Scotland’s 307-year-old marriage to England and Wales and cause the biggest political shakeup in the British Isles since Ireland split from the British crown nearly a century ago.

 

Sturgeon predicted that “what the Treasury says now in the heat of the campaign would be very different to what they say after a democratic vote for independence, when common sense would trump the campaign rhetoric.”


Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 15, 3:34 PM

This is an intriguing strategic move by the UK as Scotland considers  independence.  Some have argued that this move will backfire and push more Scottish voters into the "yes" camp.  In related news, the BBC reports that EU officials say that an independent Scotland would have a hard time joining the European Union.  


Tags: devolutionpolitical, states, sovereignty, autonomy, Europe, unit 4 political, currency, economic.
.

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Stunning Portraits Of The World’s Remotest Tribes Before They Pass Away (46 pics)

Stunning Portraits Of The World’s Remotest Tribes Before They Pass Away (46 pics) | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
Living in a concrete box with hot water pouring from the tap, a refrigerator cooling our food and wi-fi connecting us to the rest of the world, we can barely imagine a day in a life of, say, Tsaatan people. They move 5 to 10 times per year, building huts when the temperature is -40 and herding ...
FCHSAPGEO's insight:

Would love to hear the negatives and positive comments about a photographer taking these pictures-

 

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Will saving poor children lead to overpopulation?

Hans Rosling explains a very common misunderstanding about the world. CC by www.gapminder.org

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 27, 8:05 AM

Tags: population, demographic transition model, declining population, demographicsmodels, gapminderdevelopment.

Ms. Harrington's curator insight, January 28, 6:18 PM

A clear explanation of how saving the poor will slow population growth.

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40 more maps that explain the world

40 more maps that explain the world | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
I've searched wide and far for maps that can reveal and surprise and inform in ways that the daily headlines might not.
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52 Places to Go in 2014

52 Places to Go in 2014 | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
From No. 1 Cape Town all the way to No. 52 Niagara Falls, N.Y., explore the vibrant cities and spectacular coastlines, unexpected spots and new attractions that made our list this year.

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dilaycock's curator insight, January 12, 9:11 PM

Introductory activity to Geography - have students plot these on a world map, look at climate graphs & time zones, plan a trip etc.

Timothy Roth's curator insight, January 16, 1:29 PM

now all I need is the money ;-)

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Population by Latitude and Longitude

Population by Latitude and Longitude | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
Radical Cartography, brought to you by Bill Rankin

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dilaycock's curator insight, January 9, 6:03 AM

Interesting stimulus for discussion of why do we live where we live.

Geoff Findley's curator insight, January 9, 9:37 PM

Cool Cartogram...

 

Keisha Lewis's curator insight, January 12, 8:15 AM

Majorly cool! So many discussions about population distribution can come out of this. :)

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New Year Celebrated Around the World

New Year Celebrated Around the World | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
Major cities across the world celebrated the beginning of 2014 with fireworks and music, ringing in the new year with record setting celebrations and good spirit.

About a million New York Cit...
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This Map Shows Why The Battle For 'Ukraine's Soul' Is So Pivotal

This Map Shows Why The Battle For 'Ukraine's Soul' Is So Pivotal | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
The tug-of-war for Ukraine.

Via Seth Dixon
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Adilson Camacho's curator insight, December 27, 2013 3:11 PM

O lugar da Ucrânia...

Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, February 18, 3:04 PM

With gas being the key factor to the Russia-Eu tug of war over Ukraine, Russia fights hard to win this battle. Russia needs Ukraine as their own due to all the pipelines that transport the gas to Europe. Who will win this tug-of-war?

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, March 1, 12:26 AM

This infographic gives an idea of why Russia is so invested in Ukraine. The energy infrastructure built during the Soviet era runs almost entirely through Ukraine. A significant amount of gasoline consumed in Europe comes from Russia via Ukraine, while over 2/3rds of all the gas Russia exports to the EU goes through Ukraine. This puts Ukraine in a position of power, but the country itself is divided between the East and West making siding with the EU or Russia difficult. These are lasting effects of the Soviet era.

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Idaho’s the only state where a majority of adult households have no landlines

Idaho’s the only state where a majority of adult households have no landlines | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
More adults in Idaho have embraced wireless life than have adults in any other state, according to new data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Via Seth Dixon
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Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, January 27, 6:23 PM

As technology advances and changes, so does the need for households having no landlines. In Idaho, the majority has less of a need for landlines. Although reasons for ditching a landline may seem logical and practical, this article does not mention much about pricing differences between having landlines and wifi versus the use of cellphones. Are their other beneficial reasons why it is best to ditch landlines? What could be the disadvantages? 

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, January 28, 1:11 PM

This map shows that out of all 50 states, Montana, Wyoming and South Dakota are the states that have abandoned their landline phones. Maybe this depicts a way of living in simpilier means? Maybe it is not as a neccessity as it is to more of city states compared to rural.

Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, January 30, 2:17 PM

I think most Idaho residents are wise for having only wireless telephones. In these modern times, most people have cell phones and wired telephones are becoming a thing of the past. My family and I also do not have a house phone, as we only have cell phones. I haven’t had a traditional wired telephone in my house in over ten years and we manage to save some money each month and avoid telemarketers. 

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Human Development Index variation

Human Development Index variation | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

"Here's how the United States looks when it is measured on the county level by the same standards used to rank countries by the UN, the Human Development Index.  Five variables are taken into account: life expectancy, income per capita, school enrollment, percentage of high school graduates, and percentage of college graduates." 


Via Seth Dixon
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steve smith's curator insight, March 26, 3:53 PM

A fantastic resource for development studies.

Ms. Harrington's curator insight, March 26, 6:57 PM

Regional patterns?

Brian Altonen's curator insight, March 26, 9:18 PM

A WHO map of what life in the U.S. is like demonstrates the role of urbanization and heavily population regions for defining where U.N.'s Human Development Index scores are highest.

Three of the metrics pertain primarily to education.  The fourth is a measure of financial success for a region.  The fifth is most likely a consequence of scoring well for these first four measures.

An obvious next step in making additional use of this map is to compare its findings with the distributions of various language, culture and ethnic groups in this country, according to most recent US Census patterns.  

 

 

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Interactive: The 50 Largest Ports in the World

Interactive: The 50 Largest Ports in the World | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
Investigate for yourself the mechanisms of global trade
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Trans-Dniester pleads to join Russia

Trans-Dniester pleads to join Russia | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

Pro-Russian politicians and activists in Moldova's breakaway Trans-Dniester region have asked the Russian parliament to draft a law that would allow their territory to join Russia.


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Albert Jordan's curator insight, March 18, 4:15 PM

What is amusing here is that the U.S. and its European allies will be quick to support nations that benefit them when those peoples wish to rise up "on their own," but when a nation that wants Russian support during their own "choice" it is "illegal" and against international law. What makes a country follow international law anyways? There are not many powers that could militarily force another nation to other than the U.S., the EU, Russia and China. Economically it is generally the same people who have the military might.

Coach Frye's curator insight, March 20, 10:46 AM

The Trans-Dniester region functions as a working state, but is not internationally recognized as such.  Members of this region are hoping Russia will annex them for political and economic stability.

Linh Nguyen's comment, March 21, 11:43 AM
http://thietkenoithatbietthuecopark.com/thiet-ke-biet-thu-dep/ thiết kế nội thất biệt thự sang trọng, hiện đại
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The Growth of Megacities

The Growth of Megacities | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

"For the first time in human history, more of the world’s 6.8 billion people live in cities than in rural areas. That is an incredible demographic and geographic shift since 1950 when only 30 percent of the world’s 2.5 billion inhabitants lived in urban environments.

 

The world’s largest cities, particularly in developing countries, are growing at phenomenal rates. As a growing landless class is attracted by urban opportunities, meager as they might be, these cities’ populations are ballooning to incredible numbers.

 

A May 2010 Christian Science Monitor article on “megacities” predicted that by 2050, almost 70 percent of the world’s estimated 10 billion people—more than the number of people living today—will reside in urban areas. The social, economic and environmental problems associated with a predominantly urbanized population are considerably different from those of the mostly rural world population of the past."


Via Seth Dixon
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Annette Lengyel's curator insight, February 19, 2:49 PM

Would this population shift suggest that once self-sufficient rural communities are being forced into cities to become dependent on government while industry, corporate power, and developers confiscate their lands and turn producers into consumers? The implications are quite terrifying for all living things.

Tracey M Benson's curator insight, February 24, 3:27 PM

"The world’s largest cities, particularly in developing countries, are growing at phenomenal rates. As a growing landless class is attracted by urban opportunities, meager as they might be, these cities’ populations are ballooning to incredible numbers."

Arya Okten's curator insight, March 27, 10:23 PM

Unit VII

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Military industrial complex: These 15 countries have the largest defense budgets

Military industrial complex: These 15 countries have the largest defense budgets | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
World defense spending is expected to go up for the first time in five years, thanks to China and Russia.

Via Seth Dixon
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Albert Jordan's curator insight, February 12, 5:22 PM

Brazil being in the top 15 of countries with the largest defense budget is not all that surprising considering the political, social, and economic situations of South America. Within Brazil’s sphere of influence, especially areas west of its developed cities, the Amazon jungle still is used by those deemed enemies of the state, whether actual or politically based. Because of that, there comes the difficult task of tracking and deterring rebel activity, arms or drug smuggling, etc. The borders that Brazil share with Bolivia, Colombia, and Venezuela; border security is  likely to be a concern due to the history of drug manufacture and shipping from those nations, along with the violence and corruption that comes with that activity. Not to mention the historical and violent political instability these countries have faced, which are still a concern for the region and world. Venezuela, being an “enemy of the U.S.” and Brazil being an ally, this border area is probably highly militarized or monitored. With this in mind, a slight musing could be given towards how much of the military aid and counter narcotics aid from the United States goes into Brazil’s military funding.

Brazil is also the one of the most stable and economically strong countries on the continent and in order to continue that, the government must be able to keep instability coming over from the border in check as well as deal with rebel forces using the Amazon as a safe haven. What is surprising to me however is that with how far away the rest of the countries in South America are from Brazil in military expenditures causes me to pause and think about just what they may be worrying about from their neighbors? Perhaps as they attempt to get a seat at the big table in international affairs, they feel having a stronger military will improve their image. They may not be worried about regional infighting due to the difficult terrain of the area which would make any military campaign extremely difficult and costly, besides a host of other reasons. In conclusion, Brazil is more than likely looking towards international interests in addition to showcasing their swelling national pride by spending $175 U.S. dollars per person on military expenditures while many continue to go hungry living in the famous favelas of Cidade de Deus.

 

Giovanni Sonego's curator insight, February 13, 7:48 AM

Con 25,2 miliardi di dollari L'Italia si piazza 14esima, prima dell'Iran


Oltre alla spesa complessiva, per i primi 10 paesi è riportato anche l'ammontare di spese militari pro capite.


Stati Uniti 2.000 $

Cina 83 $

Russia 475 $

Arabia Saudita 2.100 $ 

Regno Unito 900 $

Francia 797 $

Giappone, meno di 400 $

Germania 450 $

India 29 $

Brasile 175 $

 
E l'Italia? Basta dividere. Sono 413 $ a persona.

Ogni anno, la mia famiglia dà ben 2.065 $ alla difesa.

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, February 18, 1:32 PM

Russia is the third highest goverment military that spends around 143 million people lived in Russia in 2012 and they spent around $475 per person on it's military. Russia compared to China and the US is another story the US is number one in who spent the most on their military forces at $600.4 billion. As far as China is concerened it comes in at number two at spending around  $112.2 billion. These numbers make sense especially for the power house that China is and how their values of militarism affect their spending and their way of society/life.

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GMO-Free Europe

GMO-Free Europe | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

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Alison D. Gilbert's curator insight, February 5, 2:46 PM

Part of Europe know to be GMO free. Will we catch up? What will it take? A revolution?

Alison D. Gilbert's curator insight, February 5, 2:47 PM

Parts of Europe know to be GMO free. When will we?

Jason Wilhelm's curator insight, February 27, 11:25 AM

The GMO debate is raging throughout the world. Many believe that these crops have many harmful effects on the human body due their their altered genetic state. Thankfully, many countries are adopting a non-GMO attitude, as illustrated in the above map, so as to prevent the many poor side-effects they have.

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North Carolina ‘Mystery House’ contains useful secret

North Carolina ‘Mystery House’ contains useful secret | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
What appears to be just another house along a busy street that thousands drive by daily hides a valuable secret for the city.
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Big maq attack

Big maq attack | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

"A 50-year-old export industry that provides millions of jobs has to reinvent itself quickly to stay competitive."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 13, 10:32 AM

A maquiladora is a term that often used to describe a factory in Northern Mexico that enjoys special tax breaks for eport-driven production. Northern Mexico is an ideal location for this type of industry because 1) access to American markets is high and 2) labor costs are relatively low.  The Mexican Maquiladoras can no longer compete in a ‘race to the bottom’ for the lowest skill jobs, but they can produce higher-end goods and compete with China to supply more innovative consumer goods.  Labor costs in China are on the rise, making Mexico able to compete more effectively with them on the open market.  The total value of Mexican maquiladoras exports has grown by more than 50% in the last 5 years; more foreign corporations are investing money into Mexico.  Some of the more innovative and aggressive maquiladoras are attempting to become more involved in the research and development end of production; essentially they want to start competing with European and American companies on the lucrative high-end of the commodity chain instead of fighting for the scraps at the bottom. 


TagsMexicomanufacturing, industry, economic, globalization, technology.

John Slifko's curator insight, January 13, 4:02 PM

In addition to commerce what are the democratic and civil society institutions and social mvoements involved, or not involved, in this transiation now apparently underway?  

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Ships break free from ice off Antarctica

Ships break free from ice off Antarctica | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
Two ships broke free Tuesday from the Antarctic ice that had trapped them off the continent's coast.
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Walled World

Walled World | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
We chart the routes of, and reasons for, the barriers which are once again dividing populations

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Patricia Stitson's curator insight, January 8, 11:36 PM

This is exactly why I am interested in collaborative online international learning as well as adaptive learning. 

 

What are the opportunities to integrate bridge building learning activities in an cirriculum, via online learning?  Any subject any time.  Even better, how to empower students to create self-directed study accross 'walls'? Gaming?

 

What types of stories will 'retell' this scenario? Reframe perspectives?  What mediums can they be told through to reach the appropriate audiences?

Caterin Victor's curator insight, January 9, 4:00 AM

 Unfortunately,  for our    security, we  must  live  in a Walled World

Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 14, 9:48 PM

It appears India is constructing a 2,500-mile long fence around its neighboring country Bangladesh. The barbed wire fence may have been built due to that fact India has one of the largest populations in the world and they do not want the struggling people of Bangladesh to enter their country. Also, areas around the fence are becoming dangerous, with more than 1,000 people killed by border patrol and criminals. There are not many jobs in Bangladesh and the people are having trouble finding clean drinkable water. Lastly, the people may be fleeing into India hoping to find work and an improved lifestyle.  

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Atlas of the Historical Geography of the United States

Atlas of the Historical Geography of the United States | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
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Santas Around the World

Santas Around the World | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
This story map was created with the Esri Map Tour application in ArcGIS Online.

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Vivica Juarez's comment, January 13, 8:10 PM
This was definitely an interesting reading. I believe @Spencer Levesque had a very good point. They all have similar features, but are different in little ways. And who would of thought someone came on New Years too?
Kate Loy's curator insight, January 13, 10:23 PM

I find it very interesting on how other countries precieve Santa Claus. The history on him, what he looks like, how he gets around, and what they call him. Each country perceives him differently, depending on their culture and history. His clothes, age, language, and personality.

Kate Loy's curator insight, January 13, 10:28 PM

I find it very interesting on how other countries perceive Santa Claus. The history on him, what he looks like, how he gets around, and what they call him. Each country precieves him differently, depending on their culture and history. His clothes, age, language, and personality.

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Income inequality seen in satellite images from Google Earth

Income inequality seen in satellite images from Google Earth | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

Nice visual on differences in income, with associated paper.  No stats needed here; a simple exploratory/observational curiosity is all you need.  A great starter for classroom discussions/lab activities. Start with this primer where you can see the distinct difference.


Via Seth Dixon
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Christian Madison's curator insight, January 13, 7:28 PM

Well first of all I'd have to think on the bright side of life on the poor side. And on the other side, the rich side, I'd have to not take things for granted. On the poor side you'd have to use everything to it's limit and not waste a bit. While on the rich side it doesn't really matter that much.

Vivica Juarez's comment, January 13, 8:16 PM
@Sherryn Kottoor made some excellent points about the pictures. In the diagram, it shows the poor vs. the rich. It clearly proves how there is a big difference between the two. The rich have more access to things, that the poor don't. The poor are also not as fortunate when it comes to living and education.
Marcelle Searles's curator insight, January 25, 4:47 AM

useful for Year 8 and Year 11 Geography units.