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Torn between two cultures

Torn between two cultures | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
I’m guessing that most people in the translation industry are used to this question: “Which do you like better…(insert the name of your native country) or (insert the name of your “adopted” country/ies)??” I often get asked “Which do you like better, the U.S. or Europe?” It’s not an easy question to answer, but having just spent the summer in Europe, I have a few thoughts. Mostly, I think that feeling torn between two cultures is a real joy in life: two choices of location, language, identity, you name it. But it has its complications too! Feel free to add your own ideas in the comments!

In general, I am really happy in the US and in Europe, for different reasons. In the US, I love the “anyone can do it” spirit, the wide open spaces (at least where I live in Colorado!), the multiculturalism, the comparative lack of class-consciousness and the pervasive culture of hard work and optimism. In Europe, I love the slower pace of life, the sense of history, the value placed on arts and culture, and the fact that in less time than it takes to drive across Colorado, you can take the train from Geneva to Paris. Here are a few specifics that spring to mind.

When I’m in Europe, I miss:

Let’s start with an easy one: ice cubes. In Switzerland at least, there seems to be a national collective agreement that iced drinks are bad for one’s digestion, even if, or maybe especially if, it’s incredibly hot outside.
Small talk. I know this is classically American and kind of superficial, but I like a little idle chatter. It’s no coincidence that French doesn’t have a great expression for “How’s it going?” or the equivalent, and I kind of miss that. Particularly in Switzerland, it’s considered very invasive and inappropriate to strike up a conversation with a stranger, whereas in Colorado, it’s almost considered rude *not* to make some kind of conversation with someone next to you on a bus, in a line, etc.
The non-smoking culture. The smoking situation in Europe has really improved since I first lived in France 20 years ago, but it’s still very different from the US. In general I think of Switzerland as being very health-conscious, but people smoke in lots of places that would be completely taboo in the US. For example when I was on a crowded platform in the Geneva train station (waiting for the TGV to Paris!), the person next to me lit up a cigarette and no one seemed to notice, much less say anything. We also saw people smoking in the non-smoking sections of cafes in Austria without being chastised by the staff. Compared to the almost nonexistent population of smokers here in Boulder, the smoking rate in Europe is very shocking.
American opening hours. I know, this is another lazy American thing, but it’s really hard to get into the mindset of planning the day around when the grocery store is open. In Switzerland, basically everything besides restaurants closes at 5 (including “essential” businesses like pharmacies and supermarkets) and in some of the parts of Italy we visited, the mid-day break lasted from noon to 4 PM with stores being open from about 8-12 and 4-7. Even in our city of 100,000 people in the US, there are at least three supermarkets that are open 24 hours a day. Not that I generally go grocery shopping at 3 in the morning, but having things open past 5 is very nice.


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Why Geography Education Matters

Why Geography Education Matters | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

"This blog-a-thon submission comes from Joseph Kerski of the National Council of Geographic Education (2011 President). Joseph writes about why geography education matters and how it applies to each one of us."

 

 

This was one great orange! Thank you GS!

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austin tydings's comment, August 27, 2013 2:41 PM
Geography, is a subject where it takes all the skills from science, math, English, and social studies, and combines it into a in depth thinking class. It makes you find the problem, fix it and tell how and why you fixed it . For example, a crop is not growing in a dry area, then you try it in a wet area and it grows, now you have to find out why it grows in a wet area and not a dry area and explain why. It is good to start out early learning about the basics in the core classes then later in the more advance classes, to understand how to fix a problem.
Annenkov's curator insight, September 13, 2013 2:09 AM

"Geography education applies to each one of us" - not only for children, but for adults in everyday life. Who is interested in developing a personal geoculture?  

Peter Phillips's curator insight, October 5, 2013 7:37 PM

Using an orange to learn the continents of the Earth :) great idea. 

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Imagine life without a proper toilet: that's the reality for 1 in 3 people

Imagine life without a proper toilet: that's the reality for 1 in 3 people | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
It’s 2014. So why do we still need World Toilet Day? Because 2.5 billion people still need one. World Toilet Day remains a critical means to raise awareness globally about one of the many important things…

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40 Percent Of The World's Cropland Is In Or Near Cities

40 Percent Of The World's Cropland Is In Or Near Cities | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
Just how much of the world's cropland can we really call urban? That's been a big mystery until now.


Now, a study published in the journal Environmental Research Letters has an answer: Somewhere around 1.1 billion acres is being cultivated for food in or within about 12 miles (20 kilometers) of cities. Most of that land is on the periphery of cities, but 16.6 percent of these urban farms are in open spaces within the municipal core.


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Christopher L. Story's curator insight, November 18, 7:58 AM

As our course moves towards urbanization...interesting

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Polder and wiser

Polder and wiser | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
How long until the robots arrive? AT THE entrance to Hoeve Rosa farm, in the southern Dutch province of Limburg, a sign gives a warning that unmanned machines might...
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Urbanisation Up Close - Speaking of Medicine

Urbanisation Up Close - Speaking of Medicine | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
Jocalyn Clark @jocalynclark discusses the urbanisation of the world’s population and its impact on global health. Image credit: joiseyshowaa, Flickr Undeni

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City of Endangered Languages

"New York has long been a city of immigrants, but linguists now consider it a laboratory for studying and preserving languages in rapid decline elsewhere in the world."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 2, 8:28 PM

This is an excellent video for showing the diffusion of languages in the era of migration to major urban centers.  It also shows the factors that lead to the decline of indigenous languages that are on the fringe of the global economy and the importance of language to cultural traditions.   Here is the article related to the video as well as a BBC article that calls NYC a 'graveyard of languages.'  In a curious twist on the topic of endangered languages, there is a group of Native Americans in Northern California that wouldn't mind seeing their language die out with this generation.  


Tagslanguage, folk cultures, culturediffusionNYC, video.

Alexandra Piggott's curator insight, November 4, 4:30 PM

Is globalisation enabling the preservation and study of declining languages?

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, November 5, 7:59 PM

I will be showing this in class DO NOT use it for your scoop it review--

 

unit 3

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The stark difference between what poor babies and rich babies eat

The stark difference between what poor babies and rich babies eat | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
A team of researchers analyzed more than 1,500 infant diets. It was clear which babies tended to be fed appropriately, and which did not.
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Linguistic Family Tree

Linguistic Family Tree | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

"When linguists talk about the historical relationship between languages, they use a tree metaphor. An ancient source (say, Indo-European) has various branches (e.g., Romance, Germanic), which themselves have branches (West Germanic, North Germanic), which feed into specific languages (Swedish, Danish, Norwegian).  Minna Sundberg, creator of the webcomic Stand Still. Stay Silent, a story set in a lushly imagined post-apocalyptic Nordic world, has drawn the antidote to the boring linguistic tree diagram."


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16s3d's curator insight, November 8, 3:29 PM

Racines communes, connexions et interactions entre les langues sont visualisées dans cette infographie.

 

Infographie en haute définition: http://mentalfloss.com/sites/default/files/196.jpg

Linda Denty's curator insight, November 9, 7:31 PM

A really wonderful graphic.

Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, November 11, 3:21 AM

Linguistic Family Tree

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Speaking the “Language” of Spatial Analysis via Story Maps

Speaking the “Language” of Spatial Analysis via Story Maps | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

"Spatial analysis has always been a hallmark of GIS, the 'numerical recipes' which set GIS apart from other forms of computerized visualization and information management. With GIS we pose questions and derive results using a wide array of analytical tools to help us understand and compare places, determine how places are related, find the best locations and paths, detect and quantify patterns, and even to make spatial predictions."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 21, 7:50 PM

GIS is a key tool in spatial analysis, but it can also be a driving force in using math, science, technology and (yes) geography as interdisciplinary ways of teaching the curriculum.  StoryMaps can be rich with images and videos, but also filled with data at a variety of scales.  What stories can you tell in this rich, visual format?  What visual template shown might lend itself best for that sort of project? 


Tagsmapping, GISESRIgeography education, geospatial, edtech.

Caterin Victor's curator insight, October 29, 12:16 PM

 Not only Spatial, even plain geography is very interesting and important,  but.....not everybody understands, and want to...

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Second immigration wave lifts diversity to record high

Second immigration wave lifts diversity to record high | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
Immigration and other changes mean America looks very different than it did 50 years ago. What will the next 50 look like?
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Obama admin. to allow thousands of Haitians into U.S. without visas: ‘Which countries are next?’

Obama admin. to allow thousands of Haitians into U.S. without visas: ‘Which countries are next?’ | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
The ranking Republican on the Senate Judiciary Committee took the Obama administration to task Friday for its “irresponsible” plan to allow as many as 100,000 Haitians to immigrate to the U.S. without a visa.
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Population Density

This talks about what population density is and why people live where they do.-- Created using PowToon -- Free sign up at http://www.powtoon.com/ . Make your...

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Jeremy Hansen's curator insight, October 21, 10:46 AM

Excellent short video defining and explaining population density. 

Catherine Pearce's curator insight, October 23, 6:35 PM

A nice straight forward presentation

Bradley Hunkins's curator insight, October 28, 2:55 PM

Why do people live in the locations they do and how can we impact our enviroment

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Feeding the Whole World

"Louise Fresco argues that a smart approach to large-scale, industrial farming and food production will feed our planet's incoming population of nine billion. Only foods like (the scorned) supermarket white bread, she says, will nourish on a global scale."


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Marianne Naughton's curator insight, October 19, 12:07 PM

Feed The World ...

dilaycock's curator insight, October 19, 6:45 PM

Fresco argues that we tend to see "home-made" agriculture as a thing of beauty, whereas the reality is that many small scale farmers struggle and live a subsistence lifestyle. The adoration of small-scale farming, notes Fresco, is a luxury to those who can afford it. Large-scale production has increased the availability and affordability of food. Food production should be given as high a priority as climate change and sustainability, and we should seriously consider ways in which land can be used as a multi-purpose space that includes agriculture.

Stephen Zimmett's curator insight, October 24, 10:55 AM

Louise Fresco speaks of local food production and small scale control

and the entire food nework

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Asian Border Disputes

Asian Border Disputes | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

Tags: borders, political, conflict, infographic, map.


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Ruth Reynolds's curator insight, November 22, 12:02 PM

Border crossing - so many of these places are in the news - negotiation skills required

Scott Greer's curator insight, November 22, 7:13 PM

Disputes between countries over borders in Asia has led to some frosty diplomatic confrontations, with no signs of change.

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23 maps and charts on language

23 maps and charts on language | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

"Did you know that Swedish has more in common with Hindi than it does with Finnish? Explaining everything within the limits of the world is probably too ambitious a goal for a list like this. But here are 23 maps and charts that can hopefully illuminate small aspects of how we manage to communicate with one another."


Tags: language, culture, English, infographic.


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Joy Kinley's curator insight, November 20, 8:54 AM

Interesting visual representation of language and their relationships.  Language defines us.  It doesn't just give us a way to communicate but it also limits how we define and describe our world.

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Earth’s Soil Is Getting Too Salty for Crops to Grow

Earth’s Soil Is Getting Too Salty for Crops to Grow | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
Buildup of salts on irrigated land has already degraded an area the size of France and is causing $27.3 billion annually in lost crops
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Where's that bean been? Coffee's journey from crop to cafe

Where's that bean been? Coffee's journey from crop to cafe | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
Welcome to the third instalment in our series Chemistry of Coffee, where we unravel the delicious secrets of one of the most widely consumed drinks in the world. As you listen to the whirring grinders…

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Too rich for its own good

Too rich for its own good | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
The Democratic Republic of Congo is potentially one of the richest countries on earth, but colonialism, slavery and corruption have turned it into one of the poorest

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Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, November 10, 10:13 AM

Democratic Republic of Congo

Jennifer Brown's curator insight, November 10, 11:25 AM

This baffles me! To have all of these riches but still be the poorest country on earth. I guess greed destroys everything!  From the slave traders to the blood diamonds, something needs to change.  

Giselle Figueroa's curator insight, November 17, 7:09 PM

This is a very good information for those people who do not know the situation in DR Congo (I include myself). Is very sad to see these kind of things or situation. The DR Congo is one of the richest countries on earth, but because of the colonialism , slavery and CORRUPTION have turned it into one of the poorest. This article mentions that there is a war in which at least more than 5 million of people have died. This historian, Dan Snow , is telling us how awful in the situation in DR Congo. In the end of this article, he answer many question made by the public, but the last question was the one that I find interesting. the question says if he could pick just one thing to change in Congo, what would be, he answer "The rule of law. People need protection when rights are violated, to start businesses and to find out where the money goes." I think that if that happen, life in DR Congo will be better.

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How to Interpret a Satellite Image: Five Tips and Strategies

How to Interpret a Satellite Image: Five Tips and Strategies | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
What do you do when presented with a new satellite image? Here's what the Earth Observatory team does to understand the view.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 3, 9:30 AM

Aerial photography can be quite beautiful, as can satellite imagery. These are more than just pretty pictures; interpreting aerial photography and satellite imagery is not easy; here is a great article that gives an introduction on how to interpret satellite imagery. With a little training, satellite images become rich data sources (instead of some visually meaningless data).  Using Stratocam, you can explore and tag some of the amazing place on Earth. 


Tags: mapping, perspective, remote sensing, geospatial, unit 1 Geoprinciples.


Sharrock's curator insight, November 3, 12:05 PM

Seth Dixon's insight:

Aerial photography can be quite beautiful, as cansatellite imagery. These are more than just pretty pictures; interpreting aerial photography and satellite imagery is not easy; here is a great article that gives an introduction on how to interpret satellite imagery. With a little training, satellite images become rich data sources (instead of some visually meaningless data).  Using Stratocam, you can explore and tag some of the amazing place on Earth. 

 

 

Tags: mapping, perspective, remote sensing, geospatial, unit 1 Geoprinciples.

 

Michael Meller's curator insight, November 3, 11:34 PM

Cool

 

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The Strategic Importance of the Caspian Sea

"Stratfor Eurasia Analyst Eugene Chausovsky examines the Caspian Sea's large energy reserves and its conflicting maritime boundaries."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 21, 1:58 PM

After the collapse of the Soviet Union, the world's largest lake went from having just two countries on its shores to five. Dividing the maritime borders has been especially difficult since the Caspian Sea has rich energy reserves and this lake will remain a place of strategic interest for many regional powers.  This video has been added to my ESRI StoryMap that spatially organizes place-based videos for the geography classroom.    


Tags: borders, political, geopolitics, Central Asia, energy, resources, Kazakhstan, Azerbaijan, Iran, Russiaeconomic, water.

Dean Haakenson's curator insight, November 2, 10:02 AM

Again, thanks, Seth!

 

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Eerie Landforms

Eerie Landforms | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

Utah's Fantasy Canyon features mudstone eroded into bizarre shapes. This one's called "Flying Witch". #Halloween


Tags: physical, geomorphology, erosion, landforms, Utah.


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Urbanisation

Urbanisation | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

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dilaycock's curator insight, October 26, 10:50 PM

A number of audio and video resources on urbanisation in China.

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Waging War Against Global Food Waste

Waging War Against Global Food Waste | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
National Geographic Emerging Explorer Tristram Stuart wants the world to stop throwing away so much good food.

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hailey thornton's curator insight, November 6, 8:56 AM

what do we do when we have leftovers from our dinner. we throw it all away . if we just took the salvageable veggies that we can use to feed the animals that we end up eating . the landfills are being filled faster than we can get rid of what is in them .  we need to find alternative ways to get rid of our waste cause

we will be living in a land fill in the future if we dont

Rebecca McClure's curator insight, November 15, 11:13 PM

Year 9: Food Security

Alex Lewis's curator insight, November 21, 12:18 PM

I think this is a great idea, and the more we reduce our food waste, the better. We can use this food to feed the starving, which would solve two problems at once. Also, the idea of feeding the excess food to the pigs is a good idea. Not as good as conserving the food to give to the needy though. 

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Pumpkin Geography

Pumpkin Geography | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

"During the month of October, I take advantage of the pumpkin harvest to bring hands-on geography to my students.  After spending a month becoming familiar with the location of the seven continents and the major bodies of water, each student is given a pumpkin to turn into a globe. Students paint the entire surface of the pumpkin blue to represent water. Next, they use pushpins to position and trace the outline of each continent onto their pumpkins. They use actual globes as models and are careful to place the continents in the correct hemisphere. Then, they paint and label each continent a different color. They label the major bodies of water and use white paint to represent the North and South Poles."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 22, 8:57 AM

Happy October everyone!  The pictures above (from a friend's website) show how teachers and parents alike can get children involved in a fun craft that will strengthen kids' mental maps--all with a seasonal twist.  If you really love idea of pumpkin globes, you should also see this one.   


Tagsart, K12, fun, seasonal.

Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 23, 9:17 AM

Happy October everyone!  The pictures above (from a friend's website) show how teachers and parents alike can get children involved in a fun craft that will strengthen kids' mental maps--all with a seasonal twist.  If you really love idea of pumpkin globes, you should also see this one.  Besides the fun and games here are some resources to teach the geography behind Thanksgiving.     


Tagsart, K12, fun, seasonal.

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, October 27, 11:14 AM

This is a great use of connecting education and culture. Carving pumpkins is something that most children connect with this season. I think it is an effective strategy to connect these traditions with education. I think its a great way to put a educational spin on a childhood tradition. 

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World Food Day: 10 myths about hunger

World Food Day: 10 myths about hunger | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
How much do you know about global hunger? Carla Kweifio-Okai take a look at some of the biggest food production and nutrition myths

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dilaycock's curator insight, October 16, 5:34 PM

Play the interactive food game.

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Feeding Our Hungry Planet

"By 2050, the world's population will likely increase 35 percent. But is growing more food the only option—or even the best? National Geographic investigates the challenges and solutions to feeding everyone on our planet, based on an eight-month series in National Geographic magazine.  Visit http://natgeofood.com for ongoing coverage of food issues as we investigate the Future of Food today on World Food Day."

 

Tags: sustainability, agriculture, food production, unit 5 agriculture.


Via Seth Dixon
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Truthbehere2's curator insight, October 17, 10:30 AM

I think I might as well buy some land and plant my own huge garden for this crap coming up and have a fence around my yard too

Nancy Watson's curator insight, October 19, 8:53 AM

Population increase is just part of the story. How do we feed everyone? How will we provide for the needs of everyone?  Can the earth sustain the use of her resources and the impact of our growing needs and output. First we must eat. Can we learn to do that wisely?