FCHS AP HUMAN GEO...
Follow
Find
8.8K views | +0 today
 
Rescooped by FCHSAPGEO from Cultural Geography
onto FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY
Scoop.it!

Head to the pub for soulful Irish music

Head to the pub for soulful Irish music | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

JG: I picked this article because it gives a good example of Irish culture through their music traditions and customs. I also picked this article because I am a musician and I am 50% Irish, with full Irish citizenship. Music in Ireland blends history with the present times and is an ultimate social experience in this country. Once you read this article you will want to hop onto the next flight to the Emerald Isle, as I did seven years ago.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.

From around the web

Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by FCHSAPGEO
Scoop.it!

Why Geography Education Matters

Why Geography Education Matters | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

"This blog-a-thon submission comes from Joseph Kerski of the National Council of Geographic Education (2011 President). Joseph writes about why geography education matters and how it applies to each one of us."

 

 

This was one great orange! Thank you GS!

more...
austin tydings's comment, August 27, 2013 2:41 PM
Geography, is a subject where it takes all the skills from science, math, English, and social studies, and combines it into a in depth thinking class. It makes you find the problem, fix it and tell how and why you fixed it . For example, a crop is not growing in a dry area, then you try it in a wet area and it grows, now you have to find out why it grows in a wet area and not a dry area and explain why. It is good to start out early learning about the basics in the core classes then later in the more advance classes, to understand how to fix a problem.
Annenkov's curator insight, September 13, 2013 2:09 AM

"Geography education applies to each one of us" - not only for children, but for adults in everyday life. Who is interested in developing a personal geoculture?  

Peter Phillips's curator insight, October 5, 2013 7:37 PM

Using an orange to learn the continents of the Earth :) great idea. 

Rescooped by FCHSAPGEO from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Who Owns Antarctica?


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Blake Joseph's curator insight, April 24, 3:48 PM

With Antarctica being the coldest, driest, and most isolated continent on earth, it is surprising that 51 different countries own pieces of land on it. As of now, the lands there can only be used strictly for scientific research, but I presume that treaty will not be in effect forever. Hidden resources yet to be discovered and future technology and is bound to give us some reason to permanently settle in this barren land someday. Discovering oil or minerals would be a good bet, as it was a leading factor in causing Dubai to form in the Arabian Desert, or the city of Perth in Western Australia. A healthy fishing industry could even help support future economies there. While weather has always been an important factor in human colonization, it does not make a place totally inhospitable. If economies can form in places like Barrow, Alaska and Longyearbyen, Norway, I don't see future  settlements in Antarctica as an impossibility.

Norka McAlister's curator insight, April 25, 5:20 PM

In reality, no one own Antarctica for now. However, it is governed under the Antarctica treaty of 1959.  There are a few reasons why no one has been claimed Antarctica, one being that is has extremely cold temperatures that drop to -122 °F. The continent also has a vast amount of thick ice that is 3 miles deep and covers its surface. In addition, it would be very costly to explore these regions and difficult to build infrastructure and transport food due to the cold temperatures and frozen seas. The Antarctica treaty of 1959 is an international agreement which states that no one cannot own the Antarctica. However, some countries have claimed some part of Antarctica. These designated areas are only to be used for scientific research purposes. Also, since an international agreement has been putted in place, Antarctica cannot be used for military purposes. The agreement also stresses freedom of scientific investigation but prohibits nuclear testing and waste disposal in Antarctica. This research has helped scientists discover new truths about global problems, climate change, and geology. 

Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, May 1, 4:16 PM

It will be interesting to see what happens to Antartica as the climate shifts and continues to get warmer.  What is under the frozen tundra?  Will it be something of a natural resource or mineral?  I think this is when the fight will get real about the slice of pie and how much each has.  

Rescooped by FCHSAPGEO from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

These two maps show the shocking inequality in Baltimore

These two maps show the shocking inequality in Baltimore | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
How vacant houses trace the boundaries of Baltimore's black neighborhoods.


The map on the left shows one very tiny dot for each person living in Baltimore. White people are blue dots, blacks are green, Asians are red and Hispanics yellow.The map on the right shows the locations of Baltimore City's 15,928 vacant buildings. Slide between the two maps and you'll immediately notice that the wedge of white Baltimore, jutting down from the Northwest to the city center, is largely free of vacant buildings. But in the black neighborhoods on either side, empty buildings are endemic.


Tags: neighborhood, gentrification, urban, place, economic, race, poverty, spatial, housing.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, May 1, 9:37 AM

Unit 7

Lauren Quincy's curator insight, May 24, 9:14 PM

Unit 7: Cities and Urban Land Use

 

This article is about Sandtown, Baltimore and its shift into a disamenity sector. It explains how this neighborhood, mainly housed by blacks, had a high percentage of vacant houses. The article says that this neighborhood is overrun with poverty, war on drugs and gangs and has the more residents in jail than any other neighborhood. This shows the changing demographics of the city of Baltimore.

 

This relates to unit 7 because it covers the topic of disamenity sectors and changing demographics. It shows reasons for the high levels of poverty and abandoned housing. It also shows the racial spatial distribution of the neighborhood and its correlation to housing and development.  

Lydia Tsao's curator insight, May 26, 1:46 AM

This article left me heart broken. The African American community in Baltimore is stuck in a deep poverty cycle, and it cannot seem to escape its impoverished past. Even now, the poverty in the area seems to just be getting worse. The problems of income disparity lead to more problems than just economic; they lead to social and political problems. Social unrest and injustice occurs as a result of the modern white flight. This article arose as a result of the death of Freddie Gray, whose death demonstrates a significant social issue that needs to be addressed: police brutality and the criminal targeting of the African American community. His death stems from the tremendously amounts of disparity in the city. Promoting investment in the inner city would definitely help alleviate the poverty in the area. The problem is getting people to invest.

Rescooped by FCHSAPGEO from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

52 Places to Go in 2015

52 Places to Go in 2015 | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
Untrammeled oases beckon, once-avoided destinations become must-sees, and familiar cities offer new reasons to visit.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 3, 11:39 AM

Most geographers have more than a little bit of wanderlust.  Maybe we don't all have the pocketbook for it, but so many people have the desire to explore, travel and see parts of the world that feel as if they are mythical.  For students that have the curiosity, it our mission as educators to cultivate that and help them frame the world into a geographic perspective.  I've always felt that window-seat flyers are have the seed of a geographer embedded within them...let's make sure those seeds can grow. 


Tags: place, tourism.

Aki Puustinen's curator insight, April 19, 9:51 AM
Yes Sir - June to Milan !
Norka McAlister's curator insight, April 25, 5:16 PM

There are a variety of places to choose from when it comes to vacationing, but one of these places may be in your next trip in 2015. All countries have their own attractions. You will find from old cities to modern suburbs to sky-scraping metropolitan cities establishing their place global tourism market. But one thing that shocks me is how the country of Cuba has been open to the tourism business, where for so many years their communist system has been failing and now they seem to be attracted to the tourism business. In many of these countries, building development has stopped for long time but in other places, modern infrastructure brings more tourists to the city. Urbanism plays a big role in how to distribute the cities. Furthermore, cultures, cities, variety of natural landscape, natural beaches, and tradition are some of few points that attract tourism business in the area. However, in some of these places religion, political, and security needs to be addressed and policies must be implemented in order to market these areas as tourist zones. Islamic countries, communist countries, old and modern cities, and even poor countries are all becoming good places to visit in 2015.

Rescooped by FCHSAPGEO from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

50 Reasons to #LoveTheWorld

50 Reasons to #LoveTheWorld | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
We asked a range of people, from writers and chefs to musicians and photographers, to share one experience from the last year that truly inspired them – something that, in no uncertain terms, reminded them why they love the world. Madly. Here's what they told us.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 13, 12:30 PM

Most geographers have more than a little bit of wanderlust.  This BBC article is filled with images, quotes and insights into places all around the globe that fill me will a sense of awe and wonder.  For students that have the curiosity, it our mission as educators to cultivate that and help them frame information about the world into a geographic perspective.  I've always felt that window-seat flyers are have the seed of a geographer embedded within them...let's make sure those seeds can grow. 


Tags: place, tourism.

LEONARDO WILD's curator insight, April 14, 9:45 AM

The World is beautiful, but that is not being advertised except by those who want to make money with its beauty (tourism), or call attention to the fact we are destroying it (ecologists). News of destruction and suffering and corruption fill the news outlets, giving us a warped, one percent view of the planet we live in. The only one we have.

Norka McAlister's curator insight, April 18, 3:22 PM

Traveling around the world exposes all culture, traditions and history that probably you will fall in love with. These outstanding images around the world empathize regions, food, people, space, and how people survive on a daily basis will make your mind travel and enjoy places. In every image, we can take and admire sceneries from every single part of the world. Photography captures every image such of cultures, sceneries and geography for people who cannot afford to travel around world.

Break Dancing, Phnom Penh-Style

Rescooped by FCHSAPGEO from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Over population, over consumption - in pictures

Over population, over consumption - in pictures | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

"How do you raise awareness about population explosion? One group thought that the simplest way would be to show people in pictures the impact of population, pollution and consumption."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
SRA's curator insight, April 13, 2:43 PM

This is an article found on theguardian that talks about overpopulation in some regions, and overconsumption in others. There are very powerful pictures of various places around the world that really give you an idea about what is happening around the world. The one that gave me the chills is the picture of the dead bird that ingested too much plastic, thus killing it. Another powerful picture taken is the one of the surfer in Indonesia, surfing a wave of trash. 


-Jack Christensen


SRA's curator insight, April 14, 8:16 PM

Jordan Linhart


It is absolutely astounding to me how we are so continually growing and expanding as a human race. What's more astounding to me is how quickly we are depleting and wasting all of the resources we have been given. Don't get me wrong, I was aware there were 7 pushing 8 billion of us on the planet, but growing up in the suburbs I wasn't as aware of it as I could have been. Ignorance is bliss, right? It breaks my heart to see the clearing of beautiful forests, the once turquoise water of Haiti filled with trash, and the death of animals that accidentally stumbled upon our waste. If we as humans don't start taking care of our planet, there won't be any where left for us to over populate, or even populate for that matter.

Eden Eaves's curator insight, May 24, 7:56 PM

Unit 6

These eye opening photos paint a perfect picture of what the world will be like in years to come if we keep living the way we do. There are pictures of trash waves, extreme deforestation, hill-side slums, thousands of fields of oil wells, and overwhelming crowds of people.  

Rescooped by FCHSAPGEO from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

What is the future of the world's religions?

According to new Pew Research demographic projections, by 2050 there will be near parity between Muslims (2.8 billion, or 30% of the population) and Christians (2.9 billion, or 31%), possibly for the first time in history. Read more at http://pewrsr.ch/projections.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Alan Frumkin's curator insight, April 7, 7:11 PM

añada su visión ...

Zeke Robinson's curator insight, May 26, 9:06 PM

I think this is very true as the world is already shifting to Islam and losing at Christianity.

Emerald Pina's curator insight, May 26, 11:22 PM

This video gives a hypothesis on how the religions are going to look like in 2015. The Pew Research believes Muslim is going to increase, Christianity is going to have a stable pojection, and people with no religion are going to decline.

 

This article relates with Unit 3: Cultural Patterns and Proccesses because it gives a hypothesis of how religions are going to look like in 2015. I was a little surprised about the guess that people with no religion are going to decrease in number. I would that it would increase because as people get busier with life and less time for traditions and holidays, then they will start to have no religion. 

Rescooped by FCHSAPGEO from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

California Drought Tests History of Endless Growth

California Drought Tests History of Endless Growth | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
A punishing drought is forcing a reconsideration of whether the aspiration of untrammeled growth that has for so long been the state’s engine has run against the limits of nature.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 6, 8:30 PM

Major urban areas in California have limited local water resources so they draw water from large area to bring in sufficient water for these burgeoning metropolitan regions.  With this current drought getting worse, California has ordered emergency water restrictions on residents while companies and large farms have been granted exemptions even though they account for 82% of the state's annual water consumption (residential accounts for 12%). Almond farms alone consume 10% of the state's water, and many agricultural crops are incredibly water intensive land uses.  A better way to think of it isn't just about raw water usage though.  A better question to ask would be this--how does one gallon of water translate into calories that most efficiently feed people?


Questions to Ponder: How does the concept of carrying capacity relate to California urban growth/drought issues?  California passed its carrying capacity?  How are demographics, economics, politics and the environment intertwined in California?  What are the environmental limits on urban growth and development? 


Tags: physical, weather and climate, consumptionCalifornia, water, environment, resources, environment dependurban ecology.

LEONARDO WILD's curator insight, April 9, 8:49 AM

The mathematics of endless growth due to economic monetary rules has a clear outcome.

Rescooped by FCHSAPGEO from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Declining Populations

Declining Populations | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

"All over the continent, potential parents have shown reluctance to have more babies. Hence, governments and advocacy groups are becoming increasingly creative about getting their citizens to make babies."

 

Tag: Europe, declining populations, population, demographic transition model.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Emma Conde's curator insight, May 26, 10:11 PM

Unit 2: Population and Migration

 

This article is about declining population being a problem in many highly developed European countries, and measures that administrations are going through in these countries to promote population growth. In Denmark during sex ed, children are not only taught how to be safe and use contraceptives, but also the benefits of having children as a way to encourage this. Sweden compensates both moms and dads for staying at home with their new born children for up to a year, and it is very cheap to raise a child in France.

 

All of these measures relate to saving declining populations through government promotions to raise the population. This shows that not only rising populations are an issue to account for, but falling ones as well. 

Megan Becker's curator insight, May 26, 11:41 PM

Summary: This article touches on the methods that several different European countries have tried to create a population growth by convincing the public to have more children. From TV ads, to discount prices for children, these countries try several methods to aid in their countries population crisis. 

 

Insight: This is an extremely odd article, in that the European ideas to grow populations are somewhat unconventional and strange. The Danish dating website made only for people who want to have children struck me as especially strange, in the new couples in the US don't even talk about children until way into the relationship. It relates to unit 2 in that it shows European population growth and decline, which eventually can lead to economic instability. 

Gareth Jukes's curator insight, May 27, 12:53 PM

Effects of national population policies: promoting population growth in some countries or reducing fertility rates in others-

This article explains how Europe's population is starting to run lower and lower, so governments are trying to get people to have more children. In fact, the government is doing as much as they can without intervening with the families.

This article shows effects of national population policies: promoting population growth in some countries  by showing how some countries populations are declining, and the government is doing everything they can to get the fertility rate up again.

Rescooped by FCHSAPGEO from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

AP Human Geography FRQs

AP Human Geography FRQs | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

"Based upon student reactions to their multiple choice exams, I can tell that the types of questions are NOT, 'choose the correct definition for the vocabulary term.' Instead, the types of questions are leading towards giving an example of a real world phenomenon and then requesting students to tell which term best applies. And though I have not seen an actual test, it sounds like the kids were saying that the questions require more reading than the answers (I would actually prefer that to the alternative)."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 11, 10:46 AM

This article (with the outstanding infographic above) from the Human Imprint is an excellent primer to get students ready for the APHG exam.    


TagsAPHG, infographic.  

Rescooped by FCHSAPGEO from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Nicaragua's Controversial Canal

The proposed Nicaragua Canal could be one of the largest engineering projects in history and promises to bring thousands of jobs to the impoverished country. But the government’s secretive deal with a Chinese-led firm has some Nicaraguans raising the alarm about displacement and environmental destruction in the canal’s path.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 8, 2:52 PM

I'm fascinated by massive geo-engineering projects.  Usually, the proponents of the project will support it claiming that by reconfiguring the geographic settings it will lead to the economic growth of the country and strengthen their political situation.  Opponents cite that traditional land use patterns will get disrupted, the poor will be displaced, and the environment will be degraded. This canal is not so very different from many other geo-engineering projects in that respect.

 

Tags: transportation, Nicaragua, globalization, industry, economic, environment, political, resourcespolitical ecology.

Norka McAlister's curator insight, April 15, 10:04 PM

As globalization keeps expanding, the development of infrastructure in poor countries increases. This project of constructing a canal in Nicaragua comparable to the Panama Canal will impact communities and the environment. Also, it will claim some proprieties and relocate most of their communities. However, this project will have the most significant effect on the environment. Deforestation will be part of the project, displacing a huge part of wild animals. Local communities are concerned with the lake where part of the canal will be built and cause potential pollution to the lake. And to top it all off, it will reshape the look of natural beaches which is the essential natural resource for this communities. On the other hand, the project will create job opportunities for different communities. But, the project so far has created a lot of friction between the government and its communities. The severity of this clash has led to legal issues. These problems, however will not stop China, the major investor of the project, and globalization will continue to evolve.

Blake Joseph's curator insight, April 24, 4:38 PM

The Chinese government is seriously considering plans to build a new canal through Nicaragua that will rival the United States' Panama canal. The size of the planned canal will be much larger than the Panama canal, allowing much bigger freighters and cargo vessels to be able to pass through it to and from the Chinese mainland. While many Nicaraguans are enthusiastic about the potential jobs and money involved in the project, others can see through this and sense great problems for the country if completed. The canal would destroy many environments within Nicaragua such as Lake Nicaragua and the forest that are located nearby, displacing many people who live and depend on the area for food and work. China is fast becoming a world superpower, and is alarmingly similar to the old Soviet Union as far as a lack of environmental protection and the welfare of citizens. I fear the future environmental impact this will have on Nicaragua could be devastatingly similar to the fatal impacts of other old Soviet failures like the Aral Sea or Chernobyl (without the radioactive isotopes, of course). I think many Nicaraguans do as well.

Rescooped by FCHSAPGEO from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

How does the United Nations work?

"Ever curious about the reaches of the United Nation and what they do? Here's a great video featuring Dr. Binoy Kampmark from RMIT University.  This short video can help improve your understanding of the UN, including its role in world politics and policy making."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Eden Eaves's curator insight, May 24, 8:47 PM

Unit 4

This video explains what goes on at United Nations meetings. 193 people gather in New York to discuss matters of peace and security. Established in 1945 made up of 50 countries and made to prevent another World War. The UN deals with matters of economics social policy, human rights, and culture. And the most important parts is the security council (made up of France, Britain, the United States, China, and Russia) and the general assembly. 

Jacob McCullough's curator insight, May 26, 6:01 PM

Just a nice brief summary or how the United nations worked for political geography 

Shane C Cook's curator insight, May 27, 8:47 AM

The UN is one of the most impact organizations we have today. The UN is a powerful peacekeeping supranational organization organized to help all nations and countries

Scooped by FCHSAPGEO
Scoop.it!

City of Vancouver Food Strategy: What Feeds Us

City of Vancouver Food Strategy: What Feeds Us | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
Launched in January 2013, the City of Vancouver’s Food Strategy represents the culmination of over ten years of policy, planning and community organizin
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by FCHSAPGEO from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

How to fix California's drought problem

How to fix California's drought problem | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
California has enough water—that's not the problem, says Terry Tamminen. So here's how you solve the drought crisis.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 20, 2:26 PM

There is no easy fix to a complex problem such as the water shortage in California.  Some coastal cities are considering desalinization projects while others want to reduce environmental regulations that protect wetland ecosystems to harness all of the freshwater available.  One of the issues is that most of California's precipitation occurs during a very short time frame.  Before the water crisis, these potential flood waters were diverted into concrete management canals but this article advocates to build more underground cisterns to capture excess rainfall before it flows to the ocean.   


Tags: consumptionCalifornia, water, environment, resources, environment dependurban ecology.


"When the well's dry, we know the worth of water." ~Benjamin Franklin

Eden Eaves's curator insight, May 24, 5:50 PM

The sunny state of California does in fact get enough rain fall each year but because storm sewers were built after continuous flooding, all of this rainfall is pushed into the Pacific Ocean rather than where it it needed now.

A solution to the insane drought taking California by storm is to use simple rain barrels to collect water at a typical home and a graded lawn to capture and retain water, allowing it to seep into the ground rather than run off into the streets and eventually into the ocean. 

Lydia Tsao's curator insight, May 25, 2:20 AM

The article relates to irrigation and the conservation efforts discussed in Unit 5. Irrigation has a lot to do with the drought in California because massive amounts of water are being used for agriculture in California, which consists of water-needy fruits and vegetables. There are efforts to try to conserve water by installing rainwater collectors to reuse water instead of just draining usable rainwater to the ocean and rivers. There have also been installations of grey water pipes to reuse for irrigation. Grey water is any water that is flushed down the drain that isn't sewage, such as water from showers or water from washing machines. This way water wouldn't have to be wasted and can be reused.

Rescooped by FCHSAPGEO from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Scale taught in Comics

Scale taught in Comics | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

Such as a simple, powerful comic strip to teach the importance of scale.   If you prefer an image with a 'paper' look to it, try this image of the April 19, 2015 post of Mutts. 


Tags: scale, K12, location, fun.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Adilson Camacho's curator insight, April 22, 7:16 PM

Scales...

Coco Angus's curator insight, April 28, 5:56 PM

April 19 2015 

Shane C Cook's curator insight, May 27, 5:40 AM

It is kinda cool to see this comic explain scale. Short and sweet but to the point. This could easily be taught to a kid at the age of 4 or 5.

Rescooped by FCHSAPGEO from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

The world’s languages, in 7 maps and charts

The world’s languages, in 7 maps and charts | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

"These seven maps and charts, visualized by The Washington Post, will help you understand how diverse other parts of the world are in terms of languages."

 

Tags: language, culture, infographic.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Caitlyn Christiansen's curator insight, May 26, 10:35 AM

The world is extremely diverse in its spread of native languages. Yet only a handful are commonly spoken by the majority of the world, about 2/3. Over half of the world's languages are expected to go extinct because of the extreme diversity and the minimal distribution which means that in some places almost every person speaks a completely different language and many are dying as their last speakers do not pass it on to their children.

 

This article is relates to cultural patterns and processes through the geographic spread of languages around the globe and the increasing acculturation that causes the loss of many of these languages in our increasingly globalized world.

Michael Amberg's curator insight, May 26, 10:35 PM

Its interesting to see just how many people speak the languages we speak everyday, and to see just how many people DONT speak it.

Shane C Cook's curator insight, May 27, 5:34 AM

It is amazing to see all main languages in perspective to the world. Mandarine holding the top spot with 1.39 Billion surprises me but at the same time doesn't. There are 1.3 billion people living there in the first place.

Rescooped by FCHSAPGEO from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

One Place, Two Names

One Place, Two Names | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
The government of the People’s Republic of China calls the country’s westernmost region Xinjiang, but the people who have lived there for centuries refer to their home as Eastern Turkistan. Many times when two groups do not refer to a place by the same name, it points to a cultural or political conflict, as is the case here.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Lydia Tsao's curator insight, May 26, 12:42 AM

I find it extremely disturbing that the Han Chinese are using means of violence and propaganda to suppress a group of people who are simply try to maintain their own way of living. Because of the powerful connections and dominance China has in the world, no country is standing up for the people of the area. This article just demonstrates how territoriality can be so hard to define, especially when there are numerous centrifugal forces that are driving the people of an area away from one another. While China believes that the area is theirs, the Uygurs do not identify with the predominant Han Chinese who live in China, so the Uygurs would like to form their own sovereign territory and area, free of the oppression of the Chinese government.

Caitlyn Christiansen's curator insight, May 26, 10:58 AM

In China, the westernmost region of Xinjiang, is called  Eastern Turkistan by the people who have lived there for centuries. Because of its geographic location, this area has a unique culture that is influenced heavily by central Asia but has little connection to China culturally. Recently, the region was found to be rich in resources and many Chinese moved there for economic gain, but in the process have made the indigenous people, the Uygur, the minority. Ethnic conflict followed and the Chinese government has taken action by enforcing laws and creating propaganda that portrays the Uygur as the enemy and restricts their rights and, specifically, their religious freedom.


This article relates to political organization of space by a boundary that connects a region to a country with which it shares few cultural ties. In the process, political conflict ensued and the area clearly demonstrates an issue to be resolved and a governments violation of rights.

Eden Eaves's curator insight, May 26, 5:59 PM

Unit 4

The government of the People’s Republic of China calls the country’s westernmost region Xinjiang, but the people who have lived there for centuries refer to their home as Eastern Turkistan. Many times when two groups do not refer to a place by the same name, it points to a cultural or political conflict, such as this. 

This territory is newer, being part of China since 1949, it was meant to be a buffer zone for the Han Chinese from their powerful neighbors.

Rescooped by FCHSAPGEO from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Sunnis and Shiites

Sunnis and Shiites | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
Clarissa Ward breaks down the history of differences between opposing sects of Islam

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 6, 8:58 PM

The geography of the Sunni-Shiite division is incredibly important for a good understanding of world regional geography as well as modern geopolitics. This 5 minute video (as well as this NPR podcast) examine the historical and religious aspects of this split to then analyze the political and cultural implications in the Middle East today.  Additionally this Pew Research article highlights the 5 countries where the the majority of Muslims are Shiite, with some good demographic data to add to the analysis.  Take this quiz to test your knowledge.  


Tags: MiddleEast, Islamreligionhistorical, culture.

Caterin Victor's curator insight, April 14, 10:51 AM

Since Obama turmoil with his absurd Arab Spring, Sunni Shite are killing one the other like crazy Islamist

Norka McAlister's curator insight, April 15, 10:07 PM

There is a very complicated history between two major religions in the Middle East. History shows how this religion was divided by Mohamed’s death. It turned into a totally new religion and now rivals in the Middle East. I have to mention that one of my co-workers is from Syria and his definition about Sunnis and Shiites are not open minded. The history behind the Muslims religions demonstrate that the more power they have the more places they will dominate. Furthermore, human rights are violated regardless of religious denomination. For some people, Sunnis are considered as terrorist and compared to extremist groups such as Al Qaeda and ISIS. These people who do not want to implement any kind of technology in their countries are holding on to the past with their religion. However, the Shiites experience more freedom even though they still follow strict religious rules. Even the US is confused about these Middle Eastern religions as countries that used to be governed by Sunnis now are run by Shiites. The US needs to remain neutral regarding these religious changes.

Rescooped by FCHSAPGEO from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Non-Native American Nations Control over North America

Non-Native American Nations Control over North America | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon
more...
God Is.'s comment, April 5, 11:50 PM
With all due respect. Are we trying to corroborate that because we have been a colonialist nation, now we need someone to help us pay the price? or am I totally assuming wrong here...
Alex Lewis's curator insight, April 6, 10:00 AM

This animated photo shows the progression of the different nations in control of North America. The development of the U.S. is also depicted on here, as they went from mostly European control to independence. While the U.S. controlled most of what is now America, you can recognize the Civil War period by the control of Confederate States. 

 

                                        -A.L.

Kevin Cournoyer's curator insight, April 8, 1:33 PM

Wow. As a history major, I found this map timeline really interesting and really cool. It's a great example of how even though the physical geography of a place can remain the same, its political and economic geography can change so rapidly (or not so rapidly). It was especially interesting to see the brief stints that entities such as the Republic of the Rio Grande or the Confederate States of America did in the dividing up of North America over the last two and a half centuries. For someone who knows nothing about U.S. history, those blips on the radar beg the question, "what happened there?" How can a political entity encompass a geographic region and then disappear just as quickly?

 

And that ties into what I think this map is really about: colonialism. This map says a great deal about how European (or Western) empires carved up the New World and what some of their political or economic goals were in the times that the map shows. It's also important to note the title of the map: "Non-Native American Nations Control over North America". So as we see the map changing to show European or United States expansion, what we DON'T see is the gradual loss of land experienced by the various Native American tribes that inhabited the continent long before Europeans ever laid eyes on it. This map, therefore, highlights how political and economic geography can change so drastically when groups with a lot of economic, political, and military power are at odds with groups who are severely disadvantaged in these areas. 

Rescooped by FCHSAPGEO from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

GeoEd on Social Media

I don't have enough time to comment on every link that I think would be of interest to you, so I've archived some tweets with likes that I think are worth exploring.

 

Tags: geography education, social media, teacher training.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by FCHSAPGEO from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

New Images Show China Literally Gaining Ground in South China Sea

New Images Show China Literally Gaining Ground in South China Sea | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
Satellite photos show the speed, scale and ambition China has exerted to assert ownership over South China Sea islands, far from the mainland.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Marc Meynardi's curator insight, April 13, 2:40 AM

Suprisingly, the other countries dont show a lot of concerns.

Norka McAlister's curator insight, April 15, 10:06 PM

China is a powerful country with a population of 1.357 billion people. China as a regional hegemony, the more land means expansion of territorial control on the region and projecting sea power on international waters. However the main reason why China, the Philippines, and other countries are trying to claim these islands is due to the oil and natural gas exploitation in the South China Sea. Even when geopolitical conflicts between Philippines and other countries arise, any of these countries will have to form powerful armies in order to fight against China. The U.S. would be the only country that could pursue different strategies and mediate agreements between China’s neighbors. However, through military intimidation, China would overpower any country that tried to claim these islands as part of their territory. 

Lora Tortolani's curator insight, April 20, 1:37 PM

China has its hopes on securing the land that is rich in oil to bring prosperity to the country.  China is building a great wall of sand and seems as though they are not fearful of others stopping it even though China has been warned that these actions create tension from Taiwan, the Philippines, and Vietnam.  

Rescooped by FCHSAPGEO from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

15 before-and-after images that show how we're transforming the planet

15 before-and-after images that show how we're transforming the planet | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
We've dammed mighty rivers, built hundreds of artificial islands, and made the world's fourth-largest lake disappear.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 8, 12:26 PM

This article highlights 15 classroom-ready examples of environmental change that can readily detected with satellite imagery.   See these 25 from NASA's Earth Observatory for more.


Tags: remote sensing, land use, environment, geospatial, environment modify, unit 1 Geoprinciples.

LEONARDO WILD's curator insight, April 9, 8:47 AM

Transforming the planet in massive scales.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, May 21, 10:02 AM

Summer reading KQ2, How have humans altered Earth's environment? key concepts- remote sensing, land use

Rescooped by FCHSAPGEO from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Countries in multiple hemispheres

Countries in multiple hemispheres | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Lora Tortolani's curator insight, April 22, 10:11 PM

And we thought that RIC being in two different cities was kind of cool, imagine this.  

Louis Mazza's curator insight, May 6, 10:12 AM

This articles starts off describing the two meridians that divide the eastern and western hemispheres, the prime meridian and the 180th meridian. The prime meridian is the line of longitude where longitude is equal to zero. Countries east of the prime meridian are considered in the eastern hemisphere, while all countries west are located in the western hemisphere.

                Eight countries intersect in-between both of these hemispheres, there are the United Kingdom, in Europe France, Spain, Algeria, Mali, Burkina Faso, Ghana, and Togo.

                The 180th meridian is opposite the prime, and countries to the west of the 180th are in the eastern hemisphere.

                This is an interesting thing to examine because these locations are not set in stone. The tectonic plates that hold these countries will always be shifting in different directions. So in 20 years from now I wonder is the number 8 will increase or decrease?

Felix Ramos Jr.'s curator insight, May 7, 9:21 PM

Pretty neat information contained on this page.  Kiribati is the only country in the world located in all four hemispheres.  That is a place that I would love to visit.  There are not many countries that can say they are even a part of two hemispheres, let alone four.  

Rescooped by FCHSAPGEO from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

How does the United Nations work?

"Ever curious about the reaches of the United Nation and what they do? Here's a great video featuring Dr. Binoy Kampmark from RMIT University.  This short video can help improve your understanding of the UN, including its role in world politics and policy making."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Eden Eaves's curator insight, May 24, 8:47 PM

Unit 4

This video explains what goes on at United Nations meetings. 193 people gather in New York to discuss matters of peace and security. Established in 1945 made up of 50 countries and made to prevent another World War. The UN deals with matters of economics social policy, human rights, and culture. And the most important parts is the security council (made up of France, Britain, the United States, China, and Russia) and the general assembly. 

Jacob McCullough's curator insight, May 26, 6:01 PM

Just a nice brief summary or how the United nations worked for political geography 

Shane C Cook's curator insight, May 27, 8:47 AM

The UN is one of the most impact organizations we have today. The UN is a powerful peacekeeping supranational organization organized to help all nations and countries

Rescooped by FCHSAPGEO from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Can You Name the 10 Smallest Countries in the World?

Can You Name the 10 Smallest Countries in the World? | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

"A photo gallery of the world's ten smallest countries, from 0.2 square miles on up to 115 square miles, these ten smallest countries are microstates."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Zohair Ahmed's curator insight, March 23, 2:41 AM

This picture slide show has to do with microstates, which are states or terratories that are both small in population and in size. These microstates are mostly near the sea, or even islands. Microstates have both pros and cons. Pros include having an abundant buffer zone: the sea. Another pro would be being alone, or isolated, (sometimes) this makes them free from other countries, which can be a pro and a con. A con may be that the country may have a harder time accessing fresh water, and improving agriculture with little land. Unit 4 deals with Microstates. 

 

Microstates are discussed in Unit 4, and all of these are examples of Microstates. Microstates have many pros and cons listed above.

Samuel Meyer's curator insight, March 23, 11:53 AM

Pitcairn Island

Vatican City

Sovereign Military Order of Malta

San Marino

Monaco

Andorra

South Ossetia

Singapore

Transdniesteia

Bahrain

 

Just a few guesses...

 

Connor Hendricks's curator insight, March 23, 4:35 PM

This shows that the world is made up of several countries of different origins. people on this small island nation could have lived there for centuries. this is a goodway to show how diverse the world is.

Rescooped by FCHSAPGEO from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

'Dirty Old London': Geographies of Human Waste

'Dirty Old London': Geographies of Human Waste | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

In the 19th century, London was the capital of the largest empire the world had ever known — and it was infamously filthy. It had choking, sooty fogs; the Thames River was thick with human sewage; and the streets were covered with mud.  But according to Lee Jackson, author of Dirty Old London: The Victorian Fight Against Filth, mud was actually a euphemism. 'It was essentially composed of horse dung,' he tells Fresh Air's Sam Briger. 'There were tens of thousands of working horses in London [with] inevitable consequences for the streets. And the Victorians never really found an effective way of removing that, unfortunately.'"


Via Seth Dixon
FCHSAPGEO's insight:

We just spoke about this in class!

more...
Samuel Meyer's curator insight, March 23, 12:03 PM

London has come a far way from the industrial town it was in the 19th century, and is now cleaner than ever. But pollution led to many issues in London at the time. This is also evident in the developing world today, such as in China, Africa, and South America.

EuroHistoireGeoAmiens's curator insight, April 11, 10:16 AM

Pas mal en première pour une étude détaillée du Londres de Dickens

Emily Bian's curator insight, May 23, 11:41 AM

This article is about London, UK during the time of Industrial Revolution. The city of London expanded so rapidly, that there wasn't enough time for urban planning. Factories and houses were going up everywhere, and thousands of people migrated to London for jobs. This led to an influx of filth. The air was polluted and there wasn't adequate irrigation systems or waste systems. Everything dirty could be found on the streets like horse dung, and the water would get polluted and unsanitary. 

I liked this article, because it really created an image in my head how terrible and filthy the Industrial Revolution was at the start. 

7)Development and character of cities

Development and character of cities