FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY
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This is an incredible visualization of the world's shipping routes

This is an incredible visualization of the world's shipping routes | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

"Ships carry 11 billion tons of goods each year. This interactive map shows where they all go.  About 11 billion tons of stuff gets carried around the world every year by large ships. Clothes, flat-screen TVs, grain, cars, oil — transporting these goods from port to port is what makes the global economy go 'round.  And now there's a great way to visualize this entire process, through this stunning interactive map from the UCL Energy Institute."


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aitouaddaC's curator insight, May 2, 8:44 AM
On pourra voir aussi , en français  et en allemand :  http://ddc.arte.tv/nos-cartes/le-transport-maritime-coeur-de-la-mondialisation
South Florida Guide's curator insight, May 3, 11:40 AM
Very interesting.
Caitlyn Scott's curator insight, June 14, 10:25 PM
This resource shows great detail into where are products travel when they are imported but also shows us what and where Australian products are going. Good source in regards to showing how large Australia's export market is. Article contains a good amount of information as to why the routes shown on the map are taken as well as having in-depth data showing the different cargo on board ships. This data helps high light what different countries are renowned for in their exports as well as giving so information into why some countries are poorer than others when analysing their exports. Planned use within unit regarding the cost of Australian exports and its sustainability for the future.      
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Why Mercator for the Web? Isn’t the Mercator bad?

Why Mercator for the Web? Isn’t the Mercator bad? | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

"As you may know, Google Maps uses the Mercator projection. So do other Web mapping services, such as Bing Maps and MapQuest. Over the years I’ve encountered antipathy toward the use of the Web Mercator from map projection people. I know of two distinct schools of opposition. One school, consisting of cartographic folks and map aficionados, thinks the Mercator projection is 'bad': The projection misrepresents relative sizes across the globe and cannot even show the poles, they are so inflated. The other school, consisting of geodesy folks, thinks mapping services have corrupted the Mercator projection, whether by using the wrong formulæ for it or by using the wrong coordinate system for it."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 30, 2015 8:41 AM

In this article you will find a thoughtful discussion of the reasons why the Mercator projection is disliked by many, but still so prevalent.  In ArcGIS online, you can Search For Groups and then enter Projected Basemaps to see many map projections on that platform. For more resources on understanding map projections, click here


Tags: mapping, visualization, map projections, cartography, perspective, unit 1 Geoprinciples.

Luis Cesar Nunes's curator insight, October 7, 2015 7:42 AM

Mercaror ArcGis

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The Food Capitals of Instagram

The Food Capitals of Instagram | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
Explore the popularity of some of the world’s favourite foods on Instagram. Discover Instagram’s capital of curry, which cities are big on burgers, and where pulled pork is most prolific.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 12, 2015 8:41 PM

I was talking to a good friend about the geographic distribution of poutine after watching the silliest YouTube video. (Montreal is famous for it's poutine, but is in equally widespread throughout Quebec?  Canada?  Is there a core/domain/sphere areas to be mapped? These are the questions that plague geographers.).  True, this map has it's limitations; Instagram hashtag data isn't normalized so the biggest cities tend to pop out more easily, access/use of Instagram isn't uniform, etc.  Still, what a great map to show some geographic applications of social media data.  This sort of map also nicely shows the spatial concepts of region, diffusion, concentration and distribution.  


Tags: visualizationsocial media, mapping, culturediffusion, popular culture, regions, food.

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How Many Flyover States Does It Take to Equal One New York City?

How Many Flyover States Does It Take to Equal One New York City? | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

"Don’t let my New York City–centric comparisons hinder your imagination. The interactive at the top of this page lets you visualize how different parts of the country compare in population density.

Click the button at the bottom of the interactive to select Los Angeles County, for instance, and then click anywhere on the map to generate a (roughly) circular region of (roughly) equal population. The population data come from the 2010 census, and the square mileage was calculated by summing each highlighted county’s total area. You can also use New Jersey (the most densely populated state), Wyoming (the least densely populated state outside of Alaska), Texas, the coasts (the group of all counties that come within 35 miles of either the Atlantic or Pacific oceans), and, yes, New York City as the baseline for your population comparison."

 

Tags: cartography, mapping, visualization, urban, density.


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Andrew Stoops's curator insight, October 13, 2014 10:16 PM

This map is interesting in that flyover states is something that is not easily defined, at least by me. You could argue that no state is a flyover state because of the industry and businesses within the state itself. I am also curious to know why so few folks live in these areas as I have been to most of these places and they have the social and environmental pull factors important to migration.

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Local Population Pyramids

Local Population Pyramids | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

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Mrs. Karnowski's curator insight, August 27, 2014 7:13 AM

1G Theme 2: 6 Billion people and me

CT Blake's curator insight, August 29, 2014 8:27 PM

Useful for explaining population pyramids.

Sarah Ann Glesenkamp's curator insight, September 16, 2014 12:08 PM

Unit 2

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Population by Latitude and Longitude

Population by Latitude and Longitude | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
Radical Cartography, brought to you by Bill Rankin

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Geoff Findley's curator insight, January 9, 2014 9:37 PM

Cool Cartogram...

 

Keisha Lewis's curator insight, January 12, 2014 8:15 AM

Majorly cool! So many discussions about population distribution can come out of this. :)

Whitney Souery's curator insight, May 28, 2014 6:53 PM

We can see that the majority of the world's population is clustered in the mid latitudes in particularly Asia. Showing population in terms of latitude shows how people live based on environmental factors while longitude remains the same throughout, thus showing countries/continents and their rates of population simply based off of that country's growth rate or demographic momentum aside from just looking at climatic preference. For instance, Asia is the most populated area and this is evident because of the current growth rates. 

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Population Density

Population Density | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

"[This map's] an unabashedly generalized interactive population density map inspired/stolen from a map by William Bunge entitled Islands of Mankind that I came across on John Krygier‘s blog. I thought Bunge’s map was a novel way to look at population density, and I’ve tried to stay close to the spirit of the original."


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Katelyn Sesny's curator insight, October 31, 2014 12:22 PM

While most articles talk about population growth, this article provides factual and visual evidence to show population density. -UNIT 2

michelle sutherland's curator insight, January 28, 2015 8:28 PM

love the map

Daniel Lindahl's curator insight, March 21, 2015 11:50 PM

This is an interactive map that shows which parts of the world are most densely populated. It becomes very apparent to the viewer that the world is not evenly distributed at all. Places like China and India have a far higher population density than places like Russia. 

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80% of Americans Live Within 20 Miles of a Starbucks

80% of Americans Live Within 20 Miles of a Starbucks | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

The green dots on this map representing Starbucks locations which are obviously clustered in major metropolitan centers.  Cross-referencing this Starbucks address location with population data, Davenport explains his mapping technique: "By counting the number of people who live within a given distance to each Starbucks, we can measure how well centered Frappuccinos are to the US citizenry. In other words: draw a 1-mile circle around every store, then add up the % of the population living within the circles. Repeat for 2, 3, 4....100 miles."   The result of this data is a fabulous logrithmic S-curve which explains much about the American population distribution.   

 

Tags: statistics, density, consumption, mapping, visualization, urban.


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Rich's comment, October 10, 2012 1:26 PM
That is insane how large that corperation is.
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Visualizing Regional Population Statistics

It was just over two centuries ago that the global population was 1 billion — in 1804. But better medicine and improved agriculture resulted in higher life expectancy for children, dramatically increasing the world population, especially in the West.

 

This is an excellent video for population and demographic units, but also for showing regional and spatial patterns within the global dataset (since terms like 'overpopulation' and 'carrying capacity' inherently have different meanings in distinct place and when analyzed at various scales). It is also a fantastic way to visualize population data and explain the ideas that are foundational for the Demographic Transition Model.

 

Tags: population, scale, visualization, Demographics, models, unit 2 population, sustainability, regions, spatial.


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Sarah Ann Glesenkamp's curator insight, September 17, 2014 7:55 PM

Unit 2

Mohamed Mohamed's curator insight, October 13, 2014 4:03 PM

This video describes and explains how we got to a population of 7 billion people so fast

Mohamed Mohamed's curator insight, October 13, 2014 4:04 PM

It also uses water to demonstrate it.

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Why Map Projections Matter

Ok Geo students, this is the video we tried to see in class. Some of you did and others did not because of the safety issues on the computer. What did you think of it?

 

 

This is a clip from the TV show West Wing (Season 2-Episode 16) where cartography plays a key role in the plot.  In this episode the fictitious (but still on Facebook) group named "the Organization of Cartographers for Social Justice" is campaigning to have the President officially endorse the Gall-Peters Projection in schools and denounce the Mercator projection.  The argument being that children will grow up thinking some places are not as important because they are minimized by the map projection.  While a bit comical, the cartographic debate is quite informative even if it was designed to appear as though the issue was trivial. 

 

Questions to Ponder:  Why do map projections matter?  Is one global map projection inherently better than the rest?  

 

Tags: Mapping, geospatial, video, visualization. 

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Lydia Blevins's comment, September 13, 2012 6:17 AM
I think it is very important that we start using more accurate maps. In school, the maps we use are so different from how the world actually is. I agree that children will grow up thinking some places are less important because they are minimized by the map projection.
Greg Atkinson's comment, October 10, 2012 12:31 PM
Great clip. I use it in my WRG class as a comedic introduction to the power of projection.
Mary Patrick Schoettinger's curator insight, December 18, 2012 3:01 PM

This absolutely the best video clip for SS teachers EVER!

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Interactive Gnomonic Map

Interactive Gnomonic Map | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 30, 2015 9:24 AM

As stated on USGS map projections page: "[Gnomonic maps are] used by some navigators to find the shortest path between two points.  Any straight line drawn on the map is on a great circle, but directions are true only from center point of projection."  This interactive is a very fun way  to visualize this and to understand distortion.

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Map Projection Transitions

Map Projection Transitions | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

"In some ways, all 2D maps of Earth are interrupted at some point, even if it’s just along the antimeridian at 180°. Interruptions are often in areas of less interest e.g. oceans for a land-focused map."


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Lilydale High School's curator insight, September 3, 2015 6:01 AM

New ways to see the world.

Luis Cesar Nunes's curator insight, September 3, 2015 10:33 AM

map projections

Alex Smiga's curator insight, September 7, 2015 4:23 PM
Seth Dixon's insight:

No screenshot could do justice to this animation.  It transforms a map of the world from one map projection to another, and in the 5 second interval it 'spins the globe' to give you a sense of the the spatial distortions inherent in all projections.  This is but one of the many visualizations fromJason Davies mapping project.   

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Mapping World Religions


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Elle Reagan's curator insight, March 22, 2015 3:17 PM

This was a nice video of good length that allowed me to see how the world is broke up into different regions. I know that religion is a main factor of how places are divided and so I thought this video was a nice visualization of that. The map with the timeline was nice to have and I liked how it gave us an estimate of how many people are following each religion today. The video also helped me see how religion can be a main factor in defining world regions.

Jacqueline Garcia pd1's curator insight, March 22, 2015 3:26 PM

In this video we are able to see the growth and fall of religions. It was quite fascinating to see the number of people in each religion and where in the world the spread. I thought it was helpful to see the dates of events that either caused spread or destruction of religions . For example the birth of Muhammad and the Crusades. THis shows the spatial distribution of religion. 

Ryan Tibari's curator insight, May 27, 2015 9:58 AM

This video puts world religions in a more basic form. Shows the patterns that religions take on a global scale, outlining the most prominent and least prominent throughout the world. 

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Changes in the U.S. Economic Geography

Changes in the U.S. Economic Geography | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
In 1990, the manufacturing industry was the leading employer in most U.S. states, followed by retail trade. In 2003, retail trade was the leading employer in a majority of states. By 2013, health care and social assistance was the dominant industry in 34 states. This animated map shows the top industry in each state and the District of Columbia from 1990 to 2013.

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Danielle Lip's curator insight, January 26, 2015 4:19 PM

I found it quite interesting to see that most of the world in 1990 had manufacturing jobs because working at factories was the only job that was accessible with not many health care service oppurtunities. While in 2013 health care takes up most of North America, when you might expect the majority of North America to be made up of retail trade because so many malls and building are being constructed throughout the world. One positive part of this map is that job opportunities were even there in the first place, without working the economy will go downhill.

Lora Tortolani's curator insight, February 2, 2015 6:49 PM

It's amazing to see how priorities have shifted over time.  Also, this is a great display of how technology has taken over what once was human labor.  

Alex Smiga's curator insight, March 14, 7:43 PM

Shifting economies.


This interactive map is a powerful way to visually display the changes in the economic geography of the United States.  It is especially useful when discussing the transition of an economy from the secondary sector to tertiary sector.  

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The Invasion of America

The Invasion of America | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

This interactive map, produced by University of Georgia historian Claudio Saunt to accompany his new book West of the Revolution: An Uncommon History of 1776, offers a time-lapse vision of the transfer of Indian land between 1776 and 1887. As blue “Indian homelands” disappear, small red areas appear, indicating the establishment of reservations (above is a static image of the map; visit the map's page to play with its features).


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 18, 2014 11:13 AM

In the past I've shared maps that show the historic expansion of the United States--a temporal and spatial visualization of Manifest Destiny.  The difference with this interactive is that the narrative focuses on the declining territory controlled by Native Americans instead of the growth of the United States.  That may seem a minor detail, but how history is told shapes our perception of events, identities and places.

 

Tags: USA, historicalmapping, visualization

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, June 23, 2014 12:25 PM

unit 1 Perception and bias of maps

Tom Cockburn's curator insight, June 24, 2014 5:51 AM

This will likely resonate with 'first peoples' everywhere

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2013 World Population Data Sheet Interactive World Map

2013 World Population Data Sheet Interactive World Map | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

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Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 11, 2013 11:28 AM

By looking at this data sheet you can see that the worlds population will increase by the millions in 2050. These populations will increase in areas that are already very populated and in areas that are not so heavily populated yet. 

Lona Pradeep Parad's curator insight, May 28, 2014 7:00 PM

This is an interactive map where you can click the year you wish and see what the population is or will be. it allows a person to observe and understand population growth better.

Katelyn Sesny's curator insight, October 31, 2014 12:21 PM

A straightforward map that puts previous knowledge (of the rapidly growing population and the limited food supply) into prescriptive. -UNIT 2

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Twitter Languages in London

Twitter Languages in London | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

This map is a fantastic geovisualization that maps the spatial patterns of languages used on the social media platform Twitter.  This map was in part inspired by a Twitter map of Europe.  While most cities would be expected to be linguistically homogenous, but London's cosmopolitan nature and large pockets of immigrants influence the distribution greatly.

   

Tags: social media, language, neighborhood, visualization, cartography.


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Betty Denise's comment, November 7, 2012 1:13 PM
Thank you – again – for your tremendous partnership
Ursula O'Reilly Traynor's comment, December 14, 2012 9:29 PM
thanks for this! we have shared!
Ursula O'Reilly Traynor's comment, December 14, 2012 9:29 PM
thanks for this! we have shared!
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Beautiful Data Visualizations from the 19th Century

Beautiful Data Visualizations from the 19th Century | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

Do you want some inspiration to create a visually stunning - yet fully optimized - data graphic? Well, let's go back about a 140 years... Handsome Atlas developed by Jonathan Soma of Brooklyn Brainery, provides a stunning new online interface to a large collection of beautiful data visualizations from the 19th century.

 

TR: Taking into account the age of these visualizations, one has to wonder if they intended them to be used by our generation in this way. I see potential for a "web 2.0" update of these charts to make them interactive . . .

 

Tags: infographic, historical, visualization, statistics.


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How The USA Expanded In One Mesmerizing Animated GIF

How The USA Expanded In One Mesmerizing Animated GIF | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

Amazing work from wikipedia, summarizing the evolution of the US formation, originally here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Territorial_evolution_of_the_United_States

 

Tags: USA, historical, visualization. 


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Paige T's comment, September 17, 2012 10:19 AM
This is very interesting because I had no idea that the United States had gone under such transformation. Even within certain borders, there is much change in respect to who the area belongs to. You definitely have to watch it a few times to get the full affect though.
Lindsey Robinson's comment, September 17, 2012 10:21 AM
Although the moving image makes it hard to actually pinpoint the U.S expansion at specific dates, I don't think that is the point of the map. The point of the map is to show how many times territories have changed, etc. I really like the map.. I have never seen anything like it.
Jesse Gauthier's comment, September 17, 2012 10:42 AM
The United States has changed drastically through the years with state borders, but I noticed that the regions' labels of the country are still similar today. For example, the southwest is much more divided today but still classified as a region with plenty of Spanish culture.
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Amazing animated infographic look at various world stats

Amazing animated infographic look at various world stats | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
Amazing animated infographic look at various world statistics in Oceania vs. Europe vs. America vs. Africa vs. Asia, from population to homicides to number of billionaires – a fine example of how to...

 

The video doesn't have captions to denote which continent is which, otherwise this is an excellent data visualization of global and regional differences, using the theme of the Olympics as it's symbolic motif. 


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Abby Budorick's comment, September 2, 2012 12:14 PM
This is such a cool idea. I love how they used olympic rings to represent the different continents. I just wished they would've put which rings represented which continents during the whole video because it was kind of confusing. Also, I don't think they should've combined the Americas because I think they are so different and the stats would probably be very different.
Bradford Baumstark's comment, September 2, 2012 5:44 PM
The idea hat they had for this video was very interesting but it was also very confusing because they didn't tell us which color was which continent. The concted words at the beginig confused me a bit too because I'm not sure where Oceania even is.