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The global food waste scandal

Western countries throw out nearly half of their food, not because it's inedible -- but because it doesn't look appealing. Tristram Stuart delves into the shocking data of wasted food, calling for a more responsible use of global resources.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 14, 2:57 PM

No one should be surprised that more developed societies are more wasteful societies.  It is not just personal wasting of food at the house and restaurants that are the problem.  Perfectly edible food is thrown out due to size (smaller than standards but perfectly normal), cosmetics (Bananas that are shaped 'funny') and costumer preference (discarded bread crust).  This is an intriguing perceptive on our consumptive culture, but it also is helpful in framing issues such as sustainability and human and environmental interactions in a technologically advanced societies that are often removed form the land where the food they eat originates. 

 

Tags: food, agriculture, consumption, sustainability, TED, video, unit 5 agriculture.

MartinVermaak's comment, February 28, 9:17 AM
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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CLt7rhkx53c&feature=youtu.be

Sabrina Ortiz's curator insight, March 5, 7:29 PM
My scoop it opinion piece was on global food waste. How globally food is thrown by the tons daily. Its audience is everyone and its purpose is to try to get people to open their eyes and waste less. America makes over four times the amount needed to feed its people. We are hurting the environment by making so much food that just go to waste. The purpose of this is to illustrate the huge issue we have with countries of people who don’t have food to begin with and here we are throwing away perfectly good food that could be use for these people or to feed pigs to make more meat. His exigence is all the food that could be use for other people or animals and its going to land fills daily. Its like a ticking time bomb hurting earth. His constraints are the laws set on food given to live stock in Europe and companies and the corporations that control the food. He urges people to use the amount of food they truly believe they will eat.
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GPS Essentials

"GPS Essentials is the most complete GPS tool on Android Market: Navigate, manage waypoints, tracks, routes, build your own dashboard from 45 widgets."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 14, 2016 1:39 PM

GPS Essentials is a great, free app for a smart phone to create some simple, geospatial data.  Need to create a GPX file with various waypoints (that imports nicely into ArcGIS)?  Try GPS essentials (or if you only need linear data about where you've been, Map My Run works if you don't mind needing a desktop to download the GPX file). 

 

Tagsmapping, GPS, edtech, video.

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Rust Belt Rebirth Through Gentrification?

It’s become difficult to afford urban living in places like San Francisco, New York or even Portland, but there is an alternative. In Rust Belt cities like Pittsburgh, Buffalo and Cincinnati, you can buy or rent for about 1/10th the price.

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Nicholas Widaman's curator insight, September 7, 2015 4:54 PM

This clip talks about how people are "migrating" to more industrial based cities because the rent is so cheap.

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 6, 2015 4:24 PM

I like this idea of gentrification, meaning you rebuild and renovate something that is old, dilapidated, and really not worth fixing up. Renovating places like this brings a whole new atmosphere to the area, it brings it to life, a life it once had that it lost. Renovating these areas is also probably good, because it raises the value of the area and higher value areas may just attract people to come see. Also, fixing up old restaurants, bars or other forms of entertainment might be enticing to people that are local and far away to check out what is new. Also, in general it will bring new economy to the area, renovating means construction jobs, finished construction jobs lead to new jobs because something can open in a newly renovated building and that new business will need employees. 

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, April 27, 2016 12:39 PM
unit 7
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How religion(s) spread across the world

How religion(s) spread across the world | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
VIDEO: 5,000 years of religious history in two minutes.

Via Seth Dixon
FCHSAPGEO's insight:

Short, sweet and to the point--this video is a great way to show the historical geographies of major world religions.  What are the cultural barriers to the diffusion of one of these particular religions?  What geographic factors helped to facilitate the expansion of one of these world religions?   

 

Tags: religion, diffusion, culture, Christianity, Islam, Buddhism, Hinduism, Judaism,
unit 3 culture.

 

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Clayton Nelson's curator insight, March 16, 2016 9:53 AM
This video is extremely easy to watch but at the same time gives a lot of information. Very helpful! CN
Clayton Nelson's comment, April 4, 2016 10:09 AM
It is amazing to see how quickly some religions spread compared to others especially once the Islamic religion began. Also i believe its a great thing that during the age of discovery, religions were taken over to the new world with those who traveled there.
Alexis Michelle's curator insight, April 4, 2016 10:11 AM

Short, sweet and to the point--this video is a great way to show the historical geographies of major world religions. Each of these religions have been "born" somewhere and have grown to different countries. Everyone has a religion well most of everyone and I believe it is very important to know the history of the religion that you are or fit into.


Tags: religion, diffusion, culture, Christianity, Islam, Buddhism, Hinduism, Judaism,
unit 3 culture.


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Florida, before Disney

Florida, before Disney | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
Watch Mike Wallace's 60 Minutes report from 1972 to see the Florida that existed before Mickey and millions of tourists descended on Orlando.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 14, 2015 9:08 PM

This 11 minute video from the archives is a great profile of a community in flux.  Orange County, Florida was transitioning from an agricultural region off the grid to a largest tourist destination in the United States.  Obviously, the community's economic geography completely transformed, but the cultural shift to the region was equally drastic.  Since Disney today is such a well-known brand and so many students have been to Disney World, they will enjoy seeing what the community was like before it became an entertainment mecca. 


Tags: place, tourism, economichistorical.

Rebecca Cofield's curator insight, August 5, 2015 6:10 PM

This 11 minute video from the archives is a great profile of a community in flux.  Orange County, Florida was transitioning from an agricultural region off the grid to a largest tourist destination in the United States.  Obviously, the community's economic geography completely transformed, but the cultural shift to the region was equally drastic.  Since Disney today is such a well-known brand and so many students have been to Disney World, they will enjoy seeing what the community was like before it became an entertainment mecca. 

 

Tags: place, tourism, economic, historical.

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What is the future of the world's religions?

According to new Pew Research demographic projections, by 2050 there will be near parity between Muslims (2.8 billion, or 30% of the population) and Christians (2.9 billion, or 31%), possibly for the first time in history. Read more at http://pewrsr.ch/projections.

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Alan Frumkin's curator insight, April 7, 2015 7:11 PM

añada su visión ...

Zeke Robinson's curator insight, May 26, 2015 9:06 PM

I think this is very true as the world is already shifting to Islam and losing at Christianity.

Emerald Pina's curator insight, May 26, 2015 11:22 PM

This video gives a hypothesis on how the religions are going to look like in 2015. The Pew Research believes Muslim is going to increase, Christianity is going to have a stable pojection, and people with no religion are going to decline.

 

This article relates with Unit 3: Cultural Patterns and Proccesses because it gives a hypothesis of how religions are going to look like in 2015. I was a little surprised about the guess that people with no religion are going to decrease in number. I would that it would increase because as people get busier with life and less time for traditions and holidays, then they will start to have no religion. 

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How does the United Nations work?

"Ever curious about the reaches of the United Nation and what they do? Here's a great video featuring Dr. Binoy Kampmark from RMIT University.  This short video can help improve your understanding of the UN, including its role in world politics and policy making."


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Eden Eaves's curator insight, May 24, 2015 8:47 PM

Unit 4

This video explains what goes on at United Nations meetings. 193 people gather in New York to discuss matters of peace and security. Established in 1945 made up of 50 countries and made to prevent another World War. The UN deals with matters of economics social policy, human rights, and culture. And the most important parts is the security council (made up of France, Britain, the United States, China, and Russia) and the general assembly. 

Jacob McCullough's curator insight, May 26, 2015 6:01 PM

Just a nice brief summary or how the United nations worked for political geography 

Shane C Cook's curator insight, May 27, 2015 8:47 AM

The UN is one of the most impact organizations we have today. The UN is a powerful peacekeeping supranational organization organized to help all nations and countries

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Complex International Borders

More complex international borders in this follow up to part 1. 
In this video I look at even more enclaves and exclaves."


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Lydia Tsao's curator insight, March 23, 2015 11:40 PM

After viewing this video, I found one common characteristic that ties together the countries involved in all of these border disputes: hunger for power. Although culture and sacred lands do cause border disputes, I believe the underlying purpose of claiming land for cultural reasons is to demonstrate power. Claiming lands for cultural purposes demonstrates that one's culture is superior to the other's culture, so naturally the more powerful culture gets to claim territory. On another note, I think it's interesting to see just how many enclaves and exclaves exist in the world. I did not know how many existed until I saw the video. I think this shows how insignificant these border anomalies are because these exclaves are usually just governed by the other country by which they are surrounded. 

Danielle Lip's curator insight, April 7, 2015 9:13 PM

Borders seem to be a problem whether you live in one continent or another, everyone wants power and control but not everyone can gain it. This video focuses and goes into depth about enclave and exclave borders, showing the irregularity of the borders in different areas that causes conflicts and problems. An example of a problem that the citizens have to deal with is that some villages can not leave due to the road blocks due to the borders. I can not imagine not being able to leave a certain area for all that time, I would go insane and I imagine those people are as well. International borders power has to be split somehow and not everyone can always come to an easy decision because parts of the land are claimed but the people do not have any control of it. Irregular borders cause more trouble than they are worth in my opinion. The final interesting fact about this video was that you learn that Tajikistan and Kyrgyzstan are the two locations that have the most irregular border, these places must have the most conflict and problems. These borders are in places such as Germany, South Asia, China, Belgian, Sweden and Central Asia.

Nicholas A. Whitmore's curator insight, December 17, 2015 5:17 PM

A fascinating look into the complexity of borders. It is always important to keep in mind when looking at maps that the borders are neither permanent or defined as it exists in reality. Borders on world maps are rough estimations of what the borders actually are for they can't depict precise details on such a large scale. Furthermore regional/local maps sometimes do not whether as to conform to the border misconception unfortunately. In Central Asia as defined int he video the border were primarily a result of the Soviet Unions attempts to divided ethnic minorities reducing their power (primarily Stalin). As a result the countries after the collapse proceeded to claim the ethnic groups which created enclaves within each-other. As long as these groups are on peaceful terms this kind of thing isn't an issue. Unfortunately it does make the peoples lives in the enclaves slightly more difficult due to having to cross the border twice to see the rest of your country. This kind of thing was even done to the Jews in the first century AD who like the Russians wanted to eliminate or at least reduce attempts at revolution by the local populace. Hopefully Central Asia has or will make the lives of these enclaves easier.

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Power of Place: Boundaries and Borderlands

Power of Place: Boundaries and Borderlands | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

"This program, Boundaries and Borderlands, introduces the case study approach of the course. Here we examine the borderland region between the regions of North America and Latin America. The first case study, Twin Cities, Divided Lives, follows the story of Concha Martinez as she crosses between the U.S. and Mexico in order to make a life for herself and her children.  The second case study, Operation Hold the Line, follows up the question of cross-border migration raised in the first program. It takes a look at how U.S. border policy is shaping the lives of not only the people living in this borderland region, but in more distant U.S. and Mexican locations as well."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 14, 2014 3:29 PM

This is a not a new resource and I know that many of you are familiar with it, but this is worth repeating for those not familiar with the Annenberg Media's "Power of Place" video series.  With 26 videos (roughly 30 minutes each) that are regionally organized, this be a great resource for geography teachers that need either a regional of thematic case-study video clip.     


Tagsmigrationregions video, APHG.

Dennis Swender's curator insight, November 17, 2014 3:16 AM

Open borders:  An American Exceptionalism asset worth preserving?

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City of Endangered Languages

"New York has long been a city of immigrants, but linguists now consider it a laboratory for studying and preserving languages in rapid decline elsewhere in the world."


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Alexandra Piggott's curator insight, November 4, 2014 4:30 PM

Is globalisation enabling the preservation and study of declining languages?

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, November 5, 2014 7:59 PM

I will be showing this in class DO NOT use it for your scoop it review--

 

unit 3

SRA's curator insight, April 19, 2015 10:30 PM

Victoria Margo



This article really caught my eye because at a young age I was taught to speak spanish and english at the same time, and now that I am older I realize how important it is to know two languages. I will forever be grateful that my parents took the time and made my sisters and I learn something different while growing up.

Languages change over a long period of time and many times languages grow or die within time. Two main vocabulary words that I have not forgotten are Language divergence and Language convergence. Language divergence is the dividing of a language into many new languages. Language convergence is when two languages merge to become one. Both these definitions are extremely important when talking about how some languages will soon be extinct. I believe many languages have been endangered due to families and parents who do not continue speaking their language when they leave their original country/state. Language is very important to our world and society today. As stated from the short video clip, if you do not continue speaking your language then who will? I agree with that completely if you don't practice something over and over again how do you expect to get any better at it? This video was a great way to express the diffusion of languages and how families today still practice their language. This video made me think about and reflect on the video we watched in Geography class a couple weeks back because of the decline of all languages that we may not even be aware of. Many times it is hard to find older people who speak your native language but I also learned from the video we watched in class that it is possible if you are willing to try and continue something that is important to you. There are many different languages that connect to our world. 

I also liked how this article mentioned that New York is the city of immigrants, meaning New York is full of different cultures and unique language. Although this article/video does say that language has been endangered it can definitely be changed with a little knowledge of why this is happening. Geography and language tie in together quite well. I am hoping many languages can be saved for the future. 

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What Does Earth Look Like?


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MsPerry's curator insight, September 1, 2014 9:51 AM

APHG-Unit 1

Lindley Amarantos's curator insight, September 5, 2014 9:18 AM

Mapping and Satellite Imagery

Alex Smiga's curator insight, September 7, 2015 4:29 PM
Seth Dixon's insight:

This video covers various topics important to mapping and satellite imagery (and alesson from an APHG teacher on how to use this video with other resources).  There is so much more to the world and space than what we can see see.  Chromoscope, referenced in the video, simulates other forms of energy on the electromagnetic spectrum besides just visible light.  This type of information is at the core of the science behind all of our satellite imagery.  This video also covers many map projection issues and highlights online resources to understand map distortion including:

Google’s Mercator Map PuzzleJason Davies’ interactive map projection websiteInteractive Gnomonic Projectionand the military's live rendering of what the Earth looks like right now.  
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Continent by continent, TEDGlobal talks

Continent by continent, TEDGlobal talks | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
Here, go around the world in less than 180 minutes with TEDGlobal talks.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 21, 2013 3:20 PM

I've linked various TED talks on this site; this playlist is a quick global tour feature some old favorites and ones that were new to me. 


Tags: TED, worldwide, and video.

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Megacities Reflect Growing Urbanization Trend

Read the Transcript: http://to.pbs.org/b6sR86 The capital of the South Asian country Bangladesh, Dhaka, has a population that is booming. However, it stands ...

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Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 8:50 PM

To be a megacity like this, you have to conform to urbanization. There is no possible way to have such a populated and crowed city with farmlands around. This is a place of business yet residential areas, it also is where the marketplaces are and where kids go to school. Megacities need to be a part of an urban society in order for them to stay afloat.

Bec Seeto's curator insight, October 30, 2014 6:07 PM

This is a great introduction to the demographic explosion of the slums within megacities.  This is applicable to many themes within geography.   

Sarah Cannon's curator insight, December 14, 2015 10:20 AM

I can't image or even relate to the experience of living in a place like this. With rivers polluted right outside your house. And those rivers are what people bathe in and wash their clothes. I can't imagine not being able to access clean drinking water or lacking food. The people in Dhaka endure so much their whole lives, a good percentage of them will always live in poverty.

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Discovering All 59 National Parks

"Conor Knighton is winding up his year-long journey through our National Parks. He's returned with a backpack full of picture postcards, along with some thoughts."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 6, 8:30 AM

This last summer, my family went to five national parks on our cross-country journeys.  I love exploring the wonders and beauties in our National Parks, so this man's 2016 voyage to see all 59 National Parks makes me incredibly jealous.  My grandparents took me to Yellowstone and Yosemite when I was young.  These trips inspired in me a deep awe for the wonders of this Earth.  So go discover someplace new to you this year.  

 

Tags: place, tourismvideo, geo-inspiration.

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Daylight Saving Time Explained


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 1, 2015 7:00 PM

If you haven't discovered CGP Grey yet, his YouTube channel is a veritable fountain of geographic tidbits.  Day Light Savings (whether you agree with it or not) has to do with fundamental Earth-Sun relationships and have some corresponding spatial patterns of who does or does not follow it.  The tag below links to my archive of his many geographically related videos.   


Tags: CGP Grey.

Charli Wiggill's curator insight, November 2, 2015 6:45 AM

@Jackie Barnard - any use for your geographers?

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Living in the Shadow of Industrial Farming

"The world eats cheap bacon at the expense of North Carolina's rural poor." 


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Bonnie Bracey Sutton's curator insight, August 17, 2015 1:50 PM

Industrial farming, manure lagoons... do you know this type of farming?

Lilydale High School's curator insight, August 17, 2015 7:33 PM

Consequences of living near industrial sites - even if it is farming.

Matthew Richmond's curator insight, September 28, 2015 12:23 PM

This is pretty insane. I've seen other video's where it is a similar situation around chicken farms in the U.S. The people can't even go outside most of the time due to the smell, and it makes me wonder how much of the way we eat is truly devastating the planet. Beyond the smell, I can't help wonder what these types of farms would do the ground water beneath.

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Food Waste

Producers, sellers, and consumers waste tons of food. John Oliver discusses the shocking amount of food we don’t eat.

Via Seth Dixon
FCHSAPGEO's insight:

Food waste is a tragedy that we all know happens, but the economic system does not work efficiently to maximize the global food production (Disclaimer: it is HBO's John Oliver, so there is some language and references that might not be appropriate for all audiences). 


Tags: food, agriculture, consumption, sustainability, video, unit 5 agriculture.

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Jose Soto's curator insight, August 5, 2015 9:21 PM

Food waste is a tragedy that we all know happens, but the economic system does not work efficiently to maximize the global food production (Disclaimer: it is HBO's John Oliver, so there is some language and references that might not be appropriate for all audiences). 

 

Tags: food, agriculture, consumption, sustainability, video, unit 5 agriculture.

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, August 6, 2015 4:20 AM

Food waste is a tragedy that we all know happens, but the economic system does not work efficiently to maximize the global food production (Disclaimer: it is HBO's John Oliver, so there is some language and references that might not be appropriate for all audiences). 


Tags: food, agriculture, consumption, sustainability, video, unit 5 agriculture.

Sue Byrnes's curator insight, August 6, 2015 6:06 PM

Food waste is a tragedy that we all know happens, but the economic system does not work efficiently to maximize the global food production (Disclaimer: it is HBO's John Oliver, so there is some language and references that might not be appropriate for all audiences). 

 

Tags: food, agriculture, consumption, sustainability, video, unit 5 agriculture.

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Nicaragua's Controversial Canal

The proposed Nicaragua Canal could be one of the largest engineering projects in history and promises to bring thousands of jobs to the impoverished country. But the government’s secretive deal with a Chinese-led firm has some Nicaraguans raising the alarm about displacement and environmental destruction in the canal’s path.

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Blake Joseph's curator insight, April 24, 2015 4:38 PM

The Chinese government is seriously considering plans to build a new canal through Nicaragua that will rival the United States' Panama canal. The size of the planned canal will be much larger than the Panama canal, allowing much bigger freighters and cargo vessels to be able to pass through it to and from the Chinese mainland. While many Nicaraguans are enthusiastic about the potential jobs and money involved in the project, others can see through this and sense great problems for the country if completed. The canal would destroy many environments within Nicaragua such as Lake Nicaragua and the forest that are located nearby, displacing many people who live and depend on the area for food and work. China is fast becoming a world superpower, and is alarmingly similar to the old Soviet Union as far as a lack of environmental protection and the welfare of citizens. I fear the future environmental impact this will have on Nicaragua could be devastatingly similar to the fatal impacts of other old Soviet failures like the Aral Sea or Chernobyl (without the radioactive isotopes, of course). I think many Nicaraguans do as well.

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, June 1, 2015 2:13 AM


Chapter 5

Humans value, change and protect landscapes

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, April 5, 2016 8:12 AM

I'm fascinated by massive geo-engineering projects.  Usually, the proponents of the project will support it claiming that by reconfiguring the geographic settings it will lead to the economic growth of the country and strengthen their political situation.  Opponents cite that traditional land use patterns will get disrupted, the poor will be displaced, and the environment will be degraded. This canal is not so very different from many other geo-engineering projects in that respect.

 

Tags: transportation, Nicaragua, globalization, industry, economic, environment, political, resources, political ecology.

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How does the United Nations work?

"Ever curious about the reaches of the United Nation and what they do? Here's a great video featuring Dr. Binoy Kampmark from RMIT University.  This short video can help improve your understanding of the UN, including its role in world politics and policy making."


Via Seth Dixon
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Eden Eaves's curator insight, May 24, 2015 8:47 PM

Unit 4

This video explains what goes on at United Nations meetings. 193 people gather in New York to discuss matters of peace and security. Established in 1945 made up of 50 countries and made to prevent another World War. The UN deals with matters of economics social policy, human rights, and culture. And the most important parts is the security council (made up of France, Britain, the United States, China, and Russia) and the general assembly. 

Jacob McCullough's curator insight, May 26, 2015 6:01 PM

Just a nice brief summary or how the United nations worked for political geography 

Shane C Cook's curator insight, May 27, 2015 8:47 AM

The UN is one of the most impact organizations we have today. The UN is a powerful peacekeeping supranational organization organized to help all nations and countries

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Cityscapes of Rio de Janeiro


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The changing shape of world demographics

Animating the changing shape of the world population pyramid. For more multimedia content from The Economist visit our website: http://econ.st/1xqEZhX.


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Bex Swaney's curator insight, December 5, 2014 12:27 PM

Growth of the ageing population, population change as a whole

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, May 21, 2015 10:47 AM

unit 2

Deanna Metz's curator insight, March 1, 2016 8:05 PM

This is an incredibly powerful and remarkably well-done video by the Economist (see related article here) that is reminiscent of a TED-ED lesson on the importance and value of population pyramids.  This video goes nicely with this article from the World Bank entitled "The End of the Population Pyramid" which highlights the demographic changes that will be reshaping global demographics in the next 50-100 years.  


Tag: population, declining population, demographic transition model, video, APHG.

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Power of Place: Boundaries and Borderlands

Power of Place: Boundaries and Borderlands | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

"This program, Boundaries and Borderlands, introduces the case study approach of the course. Here we examine the borderland region between the regions of North America and Latin America. The first case study, Twin Cities, Divided Lives, follows the story of Concha Martinez as she crosses between the U.S. and Mexico in order to make a life for herself and her children.  The second case study, Operation Hold the Line, follows up the question of cross-border migration raised in the first program. It takes a look at how U.S. border policy is shaping the lives of not only the people living in this borderland region, but in more distant U.S. and Mexican locations as well."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 14, 2014 3:29 PM

This is a not a new resource and I know that many of you are familiar with it, but this is worth repeating for those not familiar with the Annenberg Media's "Power of Place" video series.  With 26 videos (roughly 30 minutes each) that are regionally organized, this be a great resource for geography teachers that need either a regional of thematic case-study video clip.     


Tagsmigrationregions video, APHG.

Dennis Swender's curator insight, November 17, 2014 3:16 AM

Open borders:  An American Exceptionalism asset worth preserving?

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Feeding the Whole World

"Louise Fresco argues that a smart approach to large-scale, industrial farming and food production will feed our planet's incoming population of nine billion. Only foods like (the scorned) supermarket white bread, she says, will nourish on a global scale."


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dilaycock's curator insight, October 19, 2014 6:45 PM

Fresco argues that we tend to see "home-made" agriculture as a thing of beauty, whereas the reality is that many small scale farmers struggle and live a subsistence lifestyle. The adoration of small-scale farming, notes Fresco, is a luxury to those who can afford it. Large-scale production has increased the availability and affordability of food. Food production should be given as high a priority as climate change and sustainability, and we should seriously consider ways in which land can be used as a multi-purpose space that includes agriculture.

Stephen Zimmett's curator insight, October 24, 2014 10:55 AM

Louise Fresco speaks of local food production and small scale control

and the entire food nework

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, March 16, 2016 3:43 PM

Many advocates of local foods favor a small-scale approach to farming and are opposed to large-scale agribusiness. It might be easy for those disconnected from the food production system (like me) to romanticize and mythologize the farmers of yesteryear and yearn to return to this past.  This talk highlights how essential large-scale farming is absolutely critical to feeding the global population; this other TED talk discusses many of the hunger problems especially the uneven access to food.  Here are some other pro-agribusiness resources.   

 

Tags: agriculture, food production, food distribution, agribusiness, TED

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Urbanization and the evolution of cities across 10,000 years

"About 10,000 years ago, hunter-gatherers, aided by rudimentary agriculture, moved to semi-permanent villages and never looked back. With further developments came food surpluses, leading to commerce, specialization and, many years later with the Industrial Revolution, the modern city. Vance Kite plots our urban past and how we can expect future cities to adapt to our growing populations."


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steve smith's curator insight, June 7, 2014 9:01 PM

A great look at urbanisation. 

Fathie Kundie's curator insight, June 8, 2014 9:48 AM

تاريخ التطور الحضري

Bronwyn Burke's curator insight, June 14, 2014 7:18 PM

Fabulous link between Geography and History

Rescooped by FCHSAPGEO from Geography Education
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Megacities Reflect Growing Urbanization Trend

Read the Transcript: http://to.pbs.org/b6sR86 The capital of the South Asian country Bangladesh, Dhaka, has a population that is booming. However, it stands ...

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Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 8:50 PM

To be a megacity like this, you have to conform to urbanization. There is no possible way to have such a populated and crowed city with farmlands around. This is a place of business yet residential areas, it also is where the marketplaces are and where kids go to school. Megacities need to be a part of an urban society in order for them to stay afloat.

Bec Seeto's curator insight, October 30, 2014 6:07 PM

This is a great introduction to the demographic explosion of the slums within megacities.  This is applicable to many themes within geography.   

Sarah Cannon's curator insight, December 14, 2015 10:20 AM

I can't image or even relate to the experience of living in a place like this. With rivers polluted right outside your house. And those rivers are what people bathe in and wash their clothes. I can't imagine not being able to access clean drinking water or lacking food. The people in Dhaka endure so much their whole lives, a good percentage of them will always live in poverty.