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With Porches And Parks, A Texas Community Aims For Urban Utopia

With Porches And Parks, A Texas Community Aims For Urban Utopia | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
Austin's Mueller neighborhood is a new-urbanist dream, designed to be convivial, walkable and energy-efficient. Every house has a porch or stoop, and all the cars are hidden away.

 

After moving here, respondents said, they spend an average of 90 fewer minutes a week in the car, and most reported higher levels of physical activity.  The poll results seem to validate new-urbanist gospel: good design, like sidewalks, street lighting, extensive trails and parkland, can improve social and physical health.  Part II: A Texas Community Takes on Racial Tensions Once Hidden Under The Surface.

 

Tags: housing, urban, planning, urbanism, unit 7 cities, neighborhood, podcast.


Via Seth Dixon
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Harvard’s New Ecological Urbanism App: A Glimpse of Our Urban Future

Harvard’s New Ecological Urbanism App: A Glimpse of Our Urban Future | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it

The Harvard Graduate School of Design released its Ecological Urbanism app last month. The interactive app adapts content from the GSD book of the same name, which explores how designers can unite urbanism with environmentalism.

 

Combining data from around the world, the app “reveals and locates current practices, emerging trends, and opportunities for new initiatives” in regard to the future of cities.

 

A collaboration between the school and Second Story Interactive Studios,the app stems from the GSD’s Ecological Urbanism conference and dovetails with the duo’s ongoing efforts to explore sustainability in our cities of the future.

More than 100 participating architects and designers have provided content for the project, including such heavyweights as OMA, Rem Koolhaas, Kara Oehler, and Stefano Boeri. And the ever-evolving app allows designers and academics to add research and project updates as they happen...


Via Lauren Moss, Ramune Ups, FarmRoof®
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Hail Columbia!

Hail Columbia! | FCHS AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY | Scoop.it
The federal government's relentless expansion has made Washington, D.C., America's real Second City.


From 1890-1990, Chicago was America's second largest city.  Since then Los Angeles has been the second largest city, acting as the west coast capital for the United States. Both of these cities have declined in economic and political importance in the recession, and in this article Aaron Renn argues that Washington D.C. (although demographically not in the same category) could be considered an emerging second city and chronicles it's historic development.  Readers may also be interested in how Renn ("the urbanophile") argues that all our impressions about Detroit are inaccurate. 


Tags: Washington DC, urban, historical, unit 7 cities.


Via Seth Dixon
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Mark Hathaway's curator insight, September 15, 2015 8:45 AM

This is a very thought provoking and surprising article. I did not know that Washington D.C. was doing so well. There is no question that Washington D.C. has always been important. The capitol of any nation will always be the center of the national government and political infrastructure. However, for much of its history Washington D.C was not much of anything. Politicians used to flee the city during the summer months due to the oppressive  heat. Up until the New Deal era, the federal government was a  small institution. The massive expansion of the federal government over the past 75 years has made the city an economic powerhouse. The author of the article believes that this may be a bad sign for the country.  The founders would have decried the creation of an imperial capitol.